Grants

A huge thank you to all of our supporters and donors for making all of these grants possible. Please find below a list of grants from the last 12 months; further details can be found in our Audited Accounts and Annual Review.

December 2016

We gave out a total of £20,807, which broke down as follows:

£1,913 for Big Life Foundation in Kenya for its rhino monitoring and protection work, raised via the auction of a lot at our Mystery dinner in November.

£1,498 for Borana Conservancy in  Kenya, raised by another auction lot sold at our Mystery dinner.

£1,824 from core funds was paid to the Lowveld Rhino Trust for work on the Darwin Initiative project, “Harmonizing land use in Save Valley Conservancy, south-eastern Zimbabwe”.

£317 for expenses incurred during the delivery of a training course for members of Namibia’s Protected Resource Division on how to manage informants.

We sent £5,000 to Rhino Fund Uganda, thanks to the successful auction of a volunteering experience at our Mystery dinner.

4,000 euros to the Rhino Protection Unit in Indonesia, thanks to a grant from new zoo partner Fondation Le Pal Nature in France.

A total of 6,000 euros to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia, to help cover the costs of building new stalls and facilities at the sanctuary, as part of the captive breeding programme, thanks to a repeat grant of 5,000 euros from Wilhelma Zoo-Stuttgart and 1,000 euros from Fondation Le Pal Nature.

And finally £1,805 was awarded to The Long Run, raised from the sale of two auction lots at our Mystery dinner in November.

November 2016

We gave out a total of £69,974, made up of grants as follows:

£24,767 for the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, for its annual rhino management operations and for the Etosha block count. Our thanks to US Fish & Wildlife Service (£19,825), our sister organization Save the Rhino International Inc. (£3,071) and the donors who made a grant of £1,871 possible from our core funds.

$25,200 went to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia for its Lolesha Luangwa conservation education programme. This was made up of two grants from the Disney Conservation Fund: $23,700 for ongoing running costs of Lolesha Luangwa, and $1,500 as a Disney Conservation Hero award for Sylvester Kampamba: $1,000 was given to Sylvester and $500 to Michael, his assistant.

We sent £685 to Rhino Fund Uganda, thanks to the successful auction of a volunteering experience at a dinner hosted by Andrew Rosindell MP.

£5,000 for the Rhino Protection Unit programme in Indonesia, which monitors Sumatran rhinos in Bukit Barisan Selatan and Way Kambas National Parks, thanks to a donation by supporter Ales Weiner.

£303 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia from core funds, to pay for the subsistence and travel expenses of Dr Rob Brett, who SRT engaged to carry out a strategic review of its programme.

£14,053 for the expansion of the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia, to hold the growing population of rhinos there, following the births of two calves. We are very grateful to Chester Zoo (£9,043) and Ales Weiner (£5,000) for their donations.

Finally, we sent £5,000 to TRAFFIC in Viet Nam for its behaviour-change campaigns to reduce the demand for illegal rhino horn, thanks to a grant from Simon Gibson Charitable Trust.

October 2016

We gave out a total of £105,277, made up of grants as follows:

£25,703 for the core activities of the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group. Our thanks to all the donors who made this grant possible: $3,322 from our sister organisation, Save the Rhino International Inc., $15,000 from US Fish & Wildlife Service, £429 from miscellaneous donations and 7,204 euros from Dierenpark Amersfoort and the Dutch Beasts.

£12,005 to build intelligence capacity in Kenya to tackle the illegal wildlife trade, thanks to a grant from Chester Zoo.

£64,076 for Ol Jogi in Kenya, to pay for the installation of a new digital radio system in the conservancy, thanks to a grant of $75,988 from US Fish & Wildlife Service and £2,607 from our own core funds. Kinetic Six is handling the installation and is very kindly providing extra technical support.

And £3,492 for the work of Stoprhinopoaching.com in South Africa, thanks to a bequest from the Estate of the late Gerald Anthony Gaunt.

September 2016

We gave out a total of £112,312, made up of grants as follows:

£10,762 to Big Game Parks in Swaziland, thanks to Sporting Rifle, which held an auction for its readers. This is being used to pay for training aids and equipment for the next round of ranger training, including vehicle checkpoint equipment and house / building entry and search equipment, and for ranger outpost (picket) upgrades.

£28,310 went to Borana Conservancy in Kenya to help cover annual running costs for its rhino monitors and anti-poaching teams. Of this, $20,000 came from the Charles Engelhard Foundation, £10,657 from Sporting Rifle’s readers, £500 from the Kiboko Trust and £1,942 from miscellaneous donations.

10,000 euros went to Education for Nature-Vietnam for its work to reduce the demand for illegal rhino horn, thanks to grants from our new zoo partners Zoo-Berlin and Tierpark Berlin.

We awarded £5,493 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, thanks to grants from Hamilton Zoo in New Zealand (£468), ZS East Anglia Africa Alive (£2,000), 1,500 euros from Zoo Salzburg, and £1,734 thanks to miscellaneous donations and one of our RideLondon-100 cyclists. Our grants for HiP are used to cover repairs to ranger accommodation and ablution blocks and to buy essential items of law enforcement and camping equipment for the rangers and anti-poaching units.

£7,761 to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, thanks mainly due to a grant of $10,000 from the International Rhino Foundation for informer payments.

£20,437 for the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, for its annual rhino management operations, thanks to a grant from the US Fish & Wildlife Service’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund.

$21,700 from the Wildcat Foundation went to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia for patrol equipment for the Park’s rangers.

8,000 euros for Ol Jogi in Kenya, thanks to grants of 4,000 each from Zoo-Berlin and Tierpark Berlin. This will help pay for annual refresher ranger training, delivered by 51 Degrees Ltd.

£4,420 for the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia, in response to our “It’s a baby!” appeal to mark the birth of female calf Delila. Special thanks to supporter Horst Lubnow for his gift of £1,200.

£3,465 for Welgevonden Game Reserve in South Africa, thanks to the fundraising efforts of Brad Schroder and Greg Canning, who tackled the 2016 Comrades Marathon and the Great Wall of China Marathon.

August 2016

We sent out a total of £206,488 in August, which broke down as follows:

$2,550 for the production of Pachyderm, the Journal of the African and Asian Rhino and Elephant Specialist Groups, thanks to a grant from the WWF-Kenya / WWF-Eastern Africa Programme Office.

$104,012 from US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund and $5,000 from our own core funds to the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries, to build intelligence capacity in Kenya, and 2,106 euros from OAMC for the APLRS’s Emergency Fund for black rhinos, which reimburses conservancies for 50% of the veterinary / husbandry costs incurred through treated injured black rhinos (whether through poaching attempts or intra-species fighting).

$25,847 for Borana Conservancy in Kenya, to build new ranger accommodation & ablution block at November Golf, thanks to a supplementary grant by US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund.

$21,884 for Education for Nature Vietnam’s behaviour change campaigns aimed at reducing the demand for rhino horn in Viet Nam, raised by Paul Blackthorne’s #SavetheRhinoVietnam campaign earlier this year, through the sale of special T-shirts. Thanks to Paul and to all our happy shoppers!

$35,495 for Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, which has important populations of white and black rhinos, to purchase a new vehicle for the Park, thanks to a supplementary grant by US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund.

£903 from a donation made by Ales Weiner was spent on various items for the North Luangwa Conservation Project in Zambia: on cameras, SD cards, GoPros and a mount, together with magnetic sheets for the Lolesha Luangwa Education Centre.

£49,803 to TRAFFIC-Vietnam, for final stages of the current phase of the Chi Campaign funded by the UK government’s Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund (this grant £39,803) as well as rhino’s energy and our own core funds.

A total of 6,000 euros for uMkhuze Game Reserve in South Africa, thanks to grants of 5,000 euros from Stichting Wildlife and 1,000 euros from rhino’s energy. These grants will be put towards the upgrading of ranger accommodation and equipment purchases.

As always, our very grateful thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

July 2016

We gave out a total of £394,635, made up of grants as follows:

£4,843 for Pachyderm, the journal of the African and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups and African Elephant Specialist Group. This includes $1,319 from Save the Elephants, £2,070 from the Aspinall Foundation, $1,000 from the International Rhino Foundation and £1,000 from our own core funds.

£9,605 for the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya, for its black rhino Emergency Fund, which is used to reimburse conservancy members for 50% of the costs incurred in treating injured rhinos, whether via poaching or intra-species fighting, and hand-rearing orphaned animals. Our thanks to the Swire Charitable Trust (£3,000), the Marjorie Coote Animal Charity Trust (£1,000) and the Robert Cave Memorial Fund (£5,000).

£10,535 for Big Life Foundation, which monitors and protects the black rhino population in the Chyulu Hills in Kenya. £10,000 from the Ernest Kleinwort Charitable Trust helped cover the costs of ranger wages and incentives; our thanks also to the Kiboko Trust (£500) and other donors.

£1,000 went to the Dambari Wildlife Trust in Zimbabwe, raised by the auctioning of a volunteering experience at an event held by Secret Me to benefit Save the Rhino.

£16,184 was awarded to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, thanks to the generosity of Just Wheels And Tires TSW Black Rhino Wheels. The funds were used to buy 112 tactical torches for the Park’s rangers, 2 x canvas canopies for Landcruisers, 2 x chainsaws. 34 x sleeping bags (iMfolozi), 40 x olive green overalls (Hluhluwe) and 18 x rehydration bladders.

£55,294 for the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia paid for helicopter block count to be done in Etosha National Park, to establish up-to-date population sizes for the Park’s black and white rhinos. Our very grateful thanks to the US Fish and Wildlife Service for this award.

£263,799 went to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, to pay for the purchase costs of a new fixed-wing plane for aerial patrols in North Luangwa National Park and for patrol equipment for the Park’s law enforcement and anti-poaching teams. Our extremely grateful thanks to the Wildcat Foundation for making these grants possible.

£33,375 was sent to uMkhuze Game Reserve in KwaZulu-Natal in South Africa, thanks to grants from our core funds (£2,068), miscellaneous donations (£348), Stichting Wildlife (£1,812), rhino’s energy (1,000 euros), Zoo Madrid and Parques Reunidos Foundation (1,500 euros) and finally $35,565 from USFWS. This grant will help pay for solar power, water provision and equipment for the Reserve’s rangers.

June 2016

We were able to give out a total of £245,481 in programme grants in June, which broke down as follows:

2,500 euros from Parc de Lunaret – Zoo de Montpellier for kit and equipment for the rangers and anti-poaching units working in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa

£678 from our core funds to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, to pay for the flights of two training course instructors from South Africa to Namibia, to help strengthen anti-poaching efforts.

$19,742 from US Fish and Wildlife Service RTCF to go to the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania, to help cover the costs of Rafiki wa Faru, Mkomazi’s black rhino-focused environmental education programme, during the period July 2016-June 2017. Rafiki wa Faru has been running for eight or so years now, and has gained great support from the schools and communities surrounding Mkomazi National Park.

$50,000 from the Wildcat Foundation for the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, to pay the first instalment for the purchase of a Cessna 206 for monitoring and law enforcement in North Luangwa National Park. We also sent $22,780 from USFWS RTCF for NLCP’s environmental education programme, Lolesha Luangwa,  to help cover its ongoing operating costs during the period July 2016-June 2017. Lolesha Luangwa is playing a significant role in terms of winning the hearts and minds of local communities concerning NLCP’s rhino conservation efforts.

$94,814 from USFWS RTCF for Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, to help cover vehicle running costs, senior staff salaries and tracker training costs. With an area some 25,000 km sq to patrol in north-western Namibia, vehicle costs are extremely high. We also used £884 of our own core funds to cover the international travel costs of Dr Rob Brett, of Fauna and Flora International, who was commissioned to carry out a strategic review of Save the Rhino Trust’s role and operations.

And finally, we sent £110,000 to The Long Run, for its work at Segera Ranch in Kenya and elsewhere, thanks to a donation by the Parker-Fray family. The Long Run is a flagship initiative of the Zeitz Foundation, dedicated to achieving sustainability through the balance of the 4Cs: conservation, community, culture and commerce.

As always, our thanks to all the donors, including those who wish to remain anonymous, who enabled all these grants to be made.

May 2016

We gave out a very pleasing total of £241,930, which broke down as follows:

£3,435 from funds raised by the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries’ “Running for Rangers” initiative, for the families of the African Parks rangers killed in action in Garamba National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

$50,000 for Big Life Foundation in Kenya, thanks to a grant from USFWS for ongoing costs (ranger wages and rations, informer incentives, vehicle fuel and maintenance, communications, prosecution costs, and maintenance / construction of patrol roads) during the period April 2016 to March 2017.

£8,542 for Education for Nature-Vietnam, for staff costs, the continuing efforts to reduce demand for rhino horn, and for improved law enforcement regarding rhino horn trafficking and seizures in Viet Nam. Our thanks to Zoo de la Barben for its grant of 3,000 euros towards this work; the remainder came from our core funds.

£40,452 for Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, thanks to a grant of £5,448.23 from Colchester Zoo’s “Action for the Wild” for equipment for the canine units, solar system gear at rangers' camps and ration packs for rangers, another grant of $49,993 from USFWS for roof repairs, solar panel installation, water tanks and stands etc. at ranger camps, and to miscellaneous donations received via our website.

£285 for the work of the Laikipia Wildlife Forum in Kenya.

£20,035 for Lewa Wildlife Conservancy in Kenya, raised via our 2015 Rhino Dog Squad appeal and all of its very generous donors, to support the costs of Lewa’s canine unit, which also covers neighbouring Borana Conservancy.

£29,696 for the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, thanks to grants from USFWS and from our own core funds, to pay for annual rhino management operations across Namibia’s rhino areas.

£46,956 to the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania, for a complete upgrade of the Sanctuary fence, thanks to grants of $68,708 from USFWS Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund and $5,000 from the Lubin Family Foundation.

£25,523 to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, to purchase a Toyota Landcruiser vehicle, including maintenance pack, freight (from Gibraltar) and insurance, thanks to a donation from Peter Lawrence, from his aunt Betty Liebert’s legacy.

£20,035 for Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, raised via our 2015 Rhino Dog Squad appeal and all of its very generous donors, to support the costs of Ol Pejeta’s canine unit.

£1,203 for the Rhino Protection Unit programme in Indonesia, including a £1,000 donation from Mr K Richardson.

£2,560 for Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, in order to pay the costs of a field trip for Traditional Authorities (community leaders, chiefs etc) to expose them to the horrors of rhino poaching support, and to gain their support for anti-poaching in the Kunene Region.

£8,606 for the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia, where Ratu was expecting her second calf (born safely in May). This included a very welcome repeat grant of 5,000 euros from Wilhelma Zoo in Stuttgart, and £500 from Vijay Rajan, as well as other miscellaneous donations and £3,185 from our own core funds.

And £200 for Wildlands Conservation Trust in South Africa, from a restricted donation for the Pierre Neethling Bursary Fund

Our thanks to all our wonderful donors for their support for rhino conservation activities.

April 2016

We sent out £75,904, which broke down as follows:

$52,494 from a grant from USFWS RTCF for Borana Conservancy, to pay for the construction of new accommodation and ablution blocks for Borana’s hardworking rangers. Keeping motivation and morale high is key to preventing disaffection and insider involvement in poaching.

£67 for the Dambari Wildlife Trust in Zimbabwe, thanks to misc. donations received via our website.

£10,484 for Indian Rhino Vision 2020 in Assam, thanks to grant of 2,500 euros from IDEXX, £500 from the Assam Rhinos Cricket Club, £911 from West Midlands Safari Park, £6,815 from core funds and the remainder from misc. donations received, for rhino conservation efforts in Manas National Park and Laokhowa-Burachapori Wildlife Sanctuary.

£6,054 for the Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area in Indonesia, including £5,000 from our core funds.

£20,035 for Ol Jogi in Kenya, raised via our 2015 Rhino Dog Squad appeal and all of its very generous donors, to support the costs of Ol Jogi’s canine unit.

£1,000 for the Rhino Resource Centre, whose website hosts thousands of research papers about rhino-related topics.

And £1,547 for the Environmental Investigation Agency, with whom we partner on the annual Douglas Adams Memorial Lectures.

As ever, our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

March 2016

We sent out £49,480 in grants, which breaks down as follows:

$4,925 to Suzannah Goss for editing issue 57 of Pachyderm, thanks to a grant from Save the Elephants. Pachyderm is available to read online. 

We sent £5,563 to Big Life Foundation in Kenya, to help cover ongoing ranger salaries, rations etc., thanks to grants of $5,000 from SRI Inc. and £2,000 from the Treasure Charitable Trust as well as other donations.

We awarded £15,235 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, made up of a number of grants, including a total of £1,423 from Boras Djurpark, £1,835 from Zoo Zlin, 1,271 euros from Zoo-Salzburg, 2,000 euros from Zoo de la Boissiere du Dore, $235 from SRI Inc., £1,823 from West Midland Safari Park and $1,387 from Just Wheels & Tires. As usual, Section Ranger Dirk Swart has consulted with HiP’s other Section Rangers to come up with a “shopping list” of equipment for the field rangers and anti-poaching units. Happy shopping Dirk!

£24 from our core funds to re-register the website domain name for the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe.

£1,8149 to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, to pay for a training course for MET staff and Namibian police on how to manage informants, such that they provide intelligence on poaching gangs.

£6,957 to the North Luangwa Conservation Project in Zambia, to pay the final instalment for the construction of an armoury, to store weapons used by scouts from the Department of National Parks and Wildlife safely when not in use.

Finally, we gave out Save the Rhino T-shirts, caps, badges and car stickers to field programme staff in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park and uMkhuze Game Reserve in South Africa, and in Big Game Parks in Swaziland.

We are delighted to report that we gave out a total of £1,064,046 in grants during our financial year 2015-16. Many, many thanks to all of our donors, including those who wish to remain anonymous.

February 2016

We sent out a wonderful £122,899 in grants in February, thanks to our fabulous donors and supporters:

£4,755 paid the final costs (flights, hotels and bus transfers) associated with the 2016 meeting of the African Rhino Specialist Group, held at Berg en Dal in Kruger National Park. These funds came from USFWS, the International Rhino Foundation and Defra.

£5,246 to Big Life Foundation in Kenya, to help cover ongoing costs of its rhino monitoring and protection programme. Special thanks to Gary Slaight, who donated $5,013 in honour of his daughter Chrissy.

£34,753 to Borana Conservancy in Kenya, home to a population of black rhino that was reintroduced three years ago. $20,048 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust and $5,000 from the Lubin Family Foundation will be used to help build new accommodation and ablution blocks for Borana’s team of rangers; the remainder, including a legacy of £7,000 from the estate of Anne Speight and $11,875 from SRI Inc., will help cover ongoing rhino monitoring and protection costs.

£300 to a researcher who worked on compiling evidence for a report on the involvement of Chinese nationals in the illegal trade in rhino horn, thanks to a grant from the International Rhino Foundation as well as our own core funds. Regretfully, we had to cancel publication of this report after an intervention by the CITES Management Authority.

$25,848 to Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, thanks to a grant from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust to help build new accommodation and ablution blocks for Lewa’s ranger team.

£47,336 to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe. $45,000 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust and  £6,536 from Knowsley Safari Park will be used to cover the ongoing costs of LRT’s rhino monitoring programme in Save Valley Conservancy and Bubye Valley Conservancy; while 11,248 euros from Dublin Zoo is being used to reward people for information that leads to the arrest / prosecution / conviction of those involved in rhino poaching; and the remainder came from a mix of restricted donations and core funds.

£676 to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, to pay for the flight costs of a trainer to travel from South Africa and Namibia to deliver a course on managing informants, to be held in June-July 2016.

$13,200 to the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, to help towards salaries of the tracking, fence repair and replacement, and tracker dog handler teams.

£2,545 to the Wilderness Wildlife Trust, as its share from the proceeds of an online raffle organised by Alice Gully of Aardvark Safaris.

Our thanks to everyone who made these grants possible.

January 2016

We sent out grants totalling £57,732 in January 2016 as follows:

£2,915 for the costs of the African Rhino Specialist Group’s 2016 meeting, to pay for flights, accommodation, catering and conference fees, bus hire for a field trip day etc., thanks to grants from Defra, USFWS and the International Rhino Foundation.

A further £500 from the International Rhino Foundation to researcher Amy Fitzmaurice for her work on a report on the involvement of Chinese nationals in the illegal rhino horn trade.

£29,052 for the North Luangwa Conservation Programme. This included a grant from the Wildcat Foundation for law enforcement work by North Luangwa National Park’s Rhino and Elephant Protection Unit, and $20,000 from the Disney Conservation Fund for North Luangwa’s wonderful environmental education programme focused on the black rhino, Lolesha Luangwa.

We sent $25,000 received from the Glen and Bobbie Ceiley Foundation to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, to help cover the cost of its field trackers’ rations while out on patrol and vehicle running expenses (fuel and maintenance).

And finally, we sent £7,469 to the Zambezi Society for its conservation work in Zimbabwe.

December 2015

We sent out a total of £69,949 in January, which broke down as follows:

$2,600 to Pachyderm, the journal of the IUCN African and Asian Rhino and African Elephant Specialist Groups, thanks to a grant from the International Elephant Foundation. This helped pay the cost of producing issue no. 57. Previous issues are available to read online here:http://www.pachydermjournal.org/index.php/pachy/index

We spent £11,591 (grants from USFWS and from Defra) on the costs of the 2016 IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group meeting, which is being held in Kruger National Park in February. 70 individuals from 18 different countries will be attending.

We paid Aron White, a freelance researcher, an instalment of £500 for his work on compiling a report documenting evidence of involvement by Chinese nationals in the illegal trade in rhino horn. The report, which is being co-funded by the International Rhino Foundation, will be published in February 2016.

Using funds awarded by USFWS, we paid invoices totalling £7,135 on behalf of Namibia’s Ministry of Environment and Tourism, relating to rhino operations carried out in the country in 2015, and for items for a new veterinary vehicle deployed in Etosha National Park.

We sent £16,763 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, for its ongoing rhino protection and monitoring work in the Kunene Region of Namibia. This included £2,000 from Madeleine Scott, 2,000 euros from Zoo Krefeld, £7,750 from the Desert Heart party, £3,260 from our core funds and the rest from miscellaneous donations received.

Finally, we sent £32,169, the latest quarterly instalment from the UK government’s Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, to TRAFFIC-Vietnam for its work on behaviour change to reduce the demand for rhino horn.

Our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

November 2015

We sent out a total of £11,237 in November, which broke down as follows:

$460 from the International Elephant Foundation for the production of an issue of Pachyderm, the journal of the IUCN’s African and Asian Rhino Specialist Group and the African Elephant Specialist Group.

$4,952 from USFWS to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism, to pay for vehicle consumables etc. during the country’s annual rhino management operations.

£5,161 to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, which included grants of 1,267 euros from Rhino’s energy, £3,496 raised by Artillery’s team of three London Marathon 2015 runners and other misc. donations. The funds were used for a mix of the conservation education programme, Lolesha Luangwa, and NLCP’s rhino monitoring and protection work.

£1,550 to the Rhino Fund Uganda for ranger salaries, thanks to the sale of an auction lot at our Sundowner Dinner.

Our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

October 2015

We sent out a total of £26,029 in October, which broke down as follows:

£5,183 for Pachyderm, the journal of the IUCN’s African and Asian Rhino Specialist Group and the African Elephant Specialist Group. US $6,000 came from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, while the other $1,960 came from the International Elephant Foundation.

£2,313 from USFWS was used to book flights for participants attending the 2016 IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group meeting in Kruger National Park in February.

A grant of £5,387 from Chester Zoo went to the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya, for the new post of APLRS Administrator, who will work alongside the Kenya Wildlife Service’s National Rhino Coordinator to help implement Kenya’s national black rhino strategy.

We paid two freelance researchers, Aron White and Amy Fitzmaurice, a total of £1,000 for work on compiling a report documenting evidence of involvement by Chinese nationals in the illegal trade in rhino horn. The report, which is being co-funded by the International Rhino Foundation, will be published in February 2016.

We sent a grant of $2,000, courtesy of the Taiwan Forestry Bureau, to the International Rhino Foundation to help pay for a new motorcycle for the Rhino Protection Units operating in Ujung Kulon National Park in Java, Indonesia.

A grant of $9,968 from Save African Rhino Foundation in Australia was sent to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, to pay for anti-poaching operations.

The self-named “Dutch beasts” – actually rhino keepers from Safaripark Beekse Bergen in the Netherlands, raised £4,020 in relation to their climbing Mt Kilimanjaro for Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania, which they visited as their reward for the trek. The money will help pay for aerial surveillance costs.

Finally, we used £169 of the money raised by Artillery’s team of three London Marathon 2015 runners to buy 13 monoculars, which will be used by schoolchildren taking part in visits into North Luangwa National Park in Zambia, as part of the Lolesha Luangwa conservation education programme.

Our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

September 2015

We gave out a grand total of £70,298, which broke down as follows:

£10,693 for the African Rhino Specialist Group, which included: £2,607 from USFWS to support the costs of participants’ flights to the 2016 AfRSG meeting, and £3,200 from our core funds and $7,500 from USFWS towards the Secretariat’s core activities.

£6,543 for the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya, thanks to the amazing running and fundraising efforts of the “Running for Rangers” team who completed the Marathon des Sables back in April 2015. This grant went to the Mara Elephant Project to help cover vehicle running costs.

A total of £19,071, thanks to a grant of 10,400 Swiss francs from the IUCN Kate Sanderson Bequest and misc. restricted donations from our supporters went to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, to pay for the purchase of a double-cab Toyota Hilux for the Park.

We sent £1,817 to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism to cover the costs of an external vet assisting with annual rhino management operations in Namibia.

And finally, we sent another £32,174 to TRAFFIC-Vietnam, thanks to the UK government’s Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, for continuing work on the Chi campaign to change rhino horn consumer behaviour and reduce demand in Viet Nam.

Our thanks to all the many donors to who made these grants possible.

August 2015

We sent out a total of £79,965, which broke down as follows:

£12,821 for the work of the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group: £5,907 from Defra, £1,934 from SRI Inc and £3,248 from USFWS to help cover participants’ flight costs for the 2016 meeting; and £1,719 from Defra for the conference fees for the 2016 meeting; and £13 transfer fee costs.

£11,070 for the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya. £4,691 was for the Emergency Fund for black rhinos, which pays out 50% of the costs of treating rhinos injured by fighting or in poaching attempts, which included £500 from an anonymous foundation and £48 received in misc. donations. The remaining £6,379 was from our core funds for the new post of APLRS Administrator, who will work alongside the Kenyan National Rhino Coordinator to help implement the national rhino strategy.

£26,896 for Borana Conservancy / the Running for Rangers coalition in Kenya. Gwyn Broyles donated $10,000 via SRI Inc, and donations for the team who ran the Marathon des Sables for “Running for Rangers” enabled grants of $5,000 to the BioKen Snake Farm / James Ashe Antivenom Trust and $26,917 paid for 9 x thermal-imaging cameras, 4 x Solar Gorillas and 4 x Power Gorillas, to be distributed to conservancies in the coalition.

£7,005 for Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, which included £2,000 from the Zoological Society of East Anglia (Africa Alive!) towards the costs of re-thatching some of the ranger outposts in the Park (plus the transfer fee), and £5,000 raised by Alison Squance, who went to the extraordinary lengths of shaving her head, and donated by other misc. donors to pay for a FLIR to be fitted to the new light aircraft we are helping to buy for the Park.

And finally, we sent £22,173 to Namibia’s Ministry of Environment and Tourism: $3,000 from USFWS for fixed-wing hire for annual rhino management operations; and $26,559 from USFWS and $5,000 from core funds for telemetry equipment.

Our thanks, as always, to the donors who made these grants possible.

July 2015

We sent out £76,391 in programme grants in July, which breaks down as follows: 

£9,156 for the work of the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group. $800 of this was from the International Elephant Foundation towards the publication of Pachyderm, a bi-annual international peer-reviewed journal that deals primarily with matters related to African elephant and African and Asian rhino conservation and management in the wild. It is also a platform for dissemination of information concerning the activities of the African Elephant, the African Rhino, and the Asian Rhino Specialist Groups of the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC). The remainder was from USFWS towards the 2016 AfRSG meeting costs. 

We sent £13,176 to Big Game Parks in Swaziland, thanks to a fundraising auction by Sporting Rifle magazine and its readers, which is helping pay for ranger training. Despite its proximity to the Mozambican border, there have been very few incidents of rhino poaching in the country, with the last having happened in 2014 after an almost 20-year lull.

We sent £8,060 to Borana Conservancy in Kenya to pay for 28 x Garmin Foretrex GPSs, 54 x shelter sheets and 1,000 pairs socks for the rangers, thanks to the amazing endurance achievements of the Running for Rangers team, who ran the Marathon des Sables in April 2015. The funds raised by Running for Rangers are benefiting a wide range of conservancies and NGOs in Kenya, supporting elephant and rhino conservation efforts. 

We awarded £5,161 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, to help pay for the purchase of a Savannah light aircraft, to replace the Bathawk that crashed in March due to engine failure. We are very grateful to Rhino’s energy (1,056 euros), Zoo de la Boissiere du Dore (2,500 euros), Media Tornado (1,000 euros), Parc de Lunaret – Zoo de Montpellier (2,500 euros) and Zoo Salzburg (1,226 euros) for their support for HiP. $45,000 from USFWS Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund to Namibia Helicopter Services for rhino management operations in Namibia. 

And finally we sent £3,262 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, to pay for rewards for intelligence leading to arrests. Our thanks to Neil Taylor and Roy Sarkin for donating auction lots items, John Verkaik and Zoo Krefeld (2,000 euros) for their help in making this grant possible.

June 2015

We had a busy month, sending out £360,204-worth of grants, thanks to fantastic support by US Fish & Wildlife Service and many other donors.

We sent $50,000 from USFWS to Big Life Foundation in Kenya, for ranger wages, rations, vehicle fuel and maintenance, radio repairs, prosecutions and uniforms.

We sent $58,708 from USFWS to Borana Conservancy in Kenya, to help pay for new ranger accommodation and ablution blocks. It’s really important for the day- and night-patrol teams to have separate accommodation so that each can rest / sleep undisturbed.

We were able to send another $50,000 from USFWS to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, again for repairs to field accommodation for the rangers. The thatch on the roofs had holes in it, allowing in rain (and insects), while some of the camps needed replacement water tanks and in-line pumps to provide showers and washing facilities. We sent £1,000, kindly donated by Saffery Champness, who help us with our VAT returns, towards the purchase of a new Savannah microlight (with more grants following in July).

USFWS provided $64,076 for a new vehicle (a Toyota pick-up) for veterinarian Carl-Heinz Moeller based in Etosha National Park in Namibia. As well as rhino work, Carl-Heinz works on many other species and the vehicles, which frequently have to drive off road, are used hard.

USFWS also provided $84,044 for a new vehicle (also a Toyota) for Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania. We added £3,200 from our own core funds and £850 received in misc. donations to cover the rest of the cost and to pay for a new security outpost. Again in Mkomazi, USFWS gave another $16,385 towards the ongoing operating costs of Rafiki wa Faru, the environmental education programme, to which we added £1,600 from our unrestricted income.

Peter Lawrence enabled another donation of £2,000 for North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia. Project director Ed Sayer will put this towards the cost of VHF transmitters, to be implanted in the rhinos’ horns, in this year’s rhino operations. We also made several grants to Lolesha Luangwa, the award-winning environmental education programme in North Luangwa: $250 from private donor via SRI Inc; £1,600 from our core unrestricted funds; and $26,350 from USFWS. These will help cover running costs during the period July 2015-June 2016.

We sent $90,637 from USFWS to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia. The grant will help pay for the salaries of trackers and the Director of Special Operations, as well as rations, vehicle running costs, misc. equipment and flying time.

The Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund gave us its next instalment of £33,746 for demand reduction efforts – the Chi campaign – by our partners in Vietnam, TRAFFIC-Vietnam.

And finally, we gave grants totalling £35,163 to uMkhuze Game Reserve, thanks to $49,546 from USFWS, £120 received in misc. donations and £3,200 from our own core funds, to help pay for water installation in some of the more remote ranger outposts, to save time-consuming and expensive water bowser round-trips.

May 2015

We sent out a total of £74,629 in programme grants in May:

We sent £3,895 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust to the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group to help cover the costs of Pachyderm issue 56 (July-December 2014). Pachyderm is the journal of the African Elephant, African Rhino and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups, and carries research on specific issues, reports of meetings, book reviews etc. It is available to read online here: http://www.pachydermjournal.org/

Colchester Zoo’s Action for the Wild enabled us to make a grant of £5,309 for a range of anti-poaching and monitoring equipment used by rangers in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park. Colchester Zoo has been a long-time supporter of this field programme, with annual grants since 2006.

We bought a £99 digital camera with case and memory card for Michael Eliko, the Environmental Education Assistant working for Lolesha Luangwa in North Luangwa National Park. Michael’s work involves visiting the 21 schools participating in the programme several times each year, and it is very useful for him to be able to take pictures of class activities and individual pages of the children’s Activity Books for monitoring and evaluation purposes.

We sent $100,000 to Ol Jogi in Kenya to help cover the annual running costs of its vehicle fleet, thanks to a grant from an anonymous donor.

Finally, we gave out £51-worth of caps, badges etc to staff of Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia. These small gifts help boost morale.

April 2015

We sent a  total of £60,166 out in grants in April 2015, which breaks down as follows:

£5,514 for demand reduction work / behaviour-change efforts by Education for Nature Vietnam, continuing previous work. This includes £5,000 received from the James Gibson Charitable Trust. The work in Vietnam is also being funded by the International Rhino Foundation, our partner in the USA. Recent work has included placing banners in athletic clubs and tourism companies; and a recent success was the revision of a decree, after great efforts by ENV’s policy and legislative team to have the conflicting law revised, which would have allowed certain violations against endangered species not to be considered illegal.

We sent 5,000 euros awarded by Opel Zoo in Germany to the IRF for Indian Rhino Vision 2020, specially to be used for fencing costs for Burachapori-Laokhowa Wildlife Sanctuary Complex, to which rhinos will be translocated later this year.

Dublin Zoo, which has supported the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe for several years, gave another grant of 6,000 euros for the LRT’s community incentives programme.

We made our annual grant from core funds of £900 for the work of the Rhino Resource Center, a very useful online database of thousands of articles about rhinos, covering a wide range of topics. This website is valuable for students, field programme managers, veterinarians and so on.

We sent 5,000 euros from Wilhelma Zoo Stuttgart for the Rhino Protection Unit programme in Indonesia, to help cover ongoing salaries and rations, vehicle running costs etc.

Finally, we sent a total of £42,179 to TRAFFIC-Vietnam for the ongoing roll-out of the Chi campaign, which is targeted at wealthy businessman to persuade them to stop buying and using rhino horn. This included £32,169 from the UK’s Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund, and £10,005 from our own core funds.

March 2015

We sent a lovely £69,305 out in March, bringing the grand total for 2014-15 to £848,853 given out in grants.

March’s grants broke down as follows:

£8,585 for the core work of the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group during the period January-July 2015, made up of £3,200 from our core funds, £379 from misc. donations and $7,500 from USFWS’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund.

£416 for the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya. This comprised £372 from our core funds to cover the cost of items of kit and stationery used during the recent Scene-of-the-crime training course, which we co-funded with Chester Zoo and member Sanctuaries, together with some caps, badges etc. for rangers from Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Borana Conservancy, Ol Jogi and Ol Pejeta Conservancy.

£3,594 for Big Life Foundation in Kenya, which monitors and protects a small but important black rhino population in and around the Chyulu Hills National Park. This included £3,200 from our core funds and the rest came from misc. donations received via our website etc.

£3,339 for Borana Conservancy in Kenya, from our core funds, to help pay for the construction of new accommodation and ablution blocks so that Borana’s day- and night-time ranger teams are able to sleep undisturbed, leaving them well-rested for their potentially dangerous patrols.

We received £48 in misc. donations via our website for Dambari Wildlife Trust in Zimbabwe, which will be put towards DWT’s support for rhino monitoring in Matopos National Park near Bulawayo.

We awarded £5,859 to Education for Nature Vietnam, for continuing work to reduce demand for rhino horn in the country, thanks to donations of 2,500 euros from Association Ecofaune Virement and 5,600 euros from Ales Weiner. A further grant was sent to ENV in early April, and we will report on this next month.

We sent a grand total of £27,836 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, to pay for monitoring and anti-poaching equipment for the ranger teams in the five sections of the Park. This included £426 received in misc. donations, £2,507 from Knuthenborg Safari Park, £267 from Boras Djurpark, £600 from Craig McDonnell and £1,000 from Holmes Wood Consultancy Ltd, as well as $35,480 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust to cover the costs of aerial surveillance and for PPL training for one of the Section Rangers.

We sent £117 for Greater one-horned rhino conservation efforts as part of Indian Rhino Vision 2020 in Assam, India; £68 for the Rhino Protection Unit programme in Indonesia; £261 for the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary; and £42 for the Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area, thanks to misc. donations via our website.

We sent a total of £5,847 to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, which monitors two important rhino populations in Bubye Valley Conservancy and in Save Valley Conservancy, of which $5,000 came from our core funds, £2,000 from Knowsley Safari Park and £503 from misc. donations received.

Disney Conservation Fund awarded $19,550 to Lolesha Luangwa, the conservation education programme run by the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia. We had already used part of the funds to pay for a flight for the Lolesha Luangwa Officer, Mr Sylvester Kampamba, to visit Mkomazi National Park in Tanzania to see its programme, Rafiki wa Faru, in action; so the remaining $18,720 was sent over to cover the rest of the ongoing costs during the period July 2014-June 2015.

Finally we sent £800 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, part of the money raised from at the auction of some artworks at our annual dinner in November 2014, to cover the costs of a sensitisation / exposure visit by Traditional Authorities (community chiefs etc.) in the southern part of the Kunene Region, so that they could better understand the rhino poaching problem and how local communities can help. We will include a write-up of this visit in our May 2015 ezine.

February 2015

Thanks to a very generous donation from CMI Plc, we were able to send £10,000 to the Anthony King Conservation Leaders’ Trust in Kenya. Anthony King was the former charismatic Executive Director of the Laikipia Wildlife Forum in Kenya, who died in a plane accident in February 2013. The Anthony King Conservation Leaders Trust is established in his memory: “Conservation is not a choice or something we do, it is how we live”.

January 2015

During January we sent a total of £76,290 to the field programmes we support.

We sent a total of £10,918 to pay for a Scene-of-the-crime training course in Kenya, held at Mpala Research Centre in February 2015. Those benefiting from the course include representatives from the Kenya Wildlife Service, Ol Jogi, Borana Conservancy, Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Big Life Foundation and Space for Giants. A grant of £6,110 from Chester Zoo, together with funds raised by our Operation Stop Poaching Now appeal, covered the costs of the trainers’ fees, their international and internal flights and other local logistics. We are very grateful to Rod Potter, Wayne Evans and Jamie Gaymer for their assistance with delivering this course, and hope that Kenya’s parks and reserves are able to use the skills learned to achieve a higher proportion of arrests and convictions per wildlife poaching incident.

We sent $19,118 to the Big Life Foundation in Kenya, thanks to a grant from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, to pay for camera traps, cards, batteries & cases, digital cameras, binoculars & laptop computer, and for informer  retainer salaries / rewards. Camera traps have played a significant part in documenting evidence against rhino poachers in the Chyulu Hills.

Again thanks to the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, we sent $38,168 to Borana Conservancy in Kenya, to help pay for new accommodation and ablution blocks for Borana’s rangers. Borana is home to the newest black rhino sanctuary in Kenya, and its security teams work around the clock. Being able to have separate camps for day- and night security teams means that both sets can be properly rested before they go out on patrol, and keeping ranger morale and motivation high is one of the most important parts of any rhino holder’s security plan.

We sent $33,551 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, again from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, for salary and vehicle running costs of the second Principal Field Officer. The recent surge in poaching in the Kunene Region has meant that SRT has had to reconsider its deployment of its tracker teams; the creation of this additional post will greatly help.

We awarded the final £6,223 to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, payable on completion of the successful installation of security equipment in Waterberg Plateau Park. £3,152 came from USFWS RTCF and £3,071 from our own core funds.

Finally, we used £531 from the Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund’s grant of $19,550 to Lolesha Luangwa, the North Luangwa Conservation Programme, to pay for flights from Lusaka to Kilimanjaro International, for Sylvester Kampamba, the Lolesha Luangwa Education Officer. Sylvester spent almost a week with the team running Rafiki wa Faru, the environmental education programme in Mkomazi National Park, and he and Saria enjoyed comparing notes about their respective programmes. We look forward to their debriefs!

December 2014

We sent our £33,371 in grants during December 2014 as follows:

$12,500 from our sister not-for-profit, SRI Inc., made possible by donations from the Kantor Foundation, Steven D Bell,  Mr Thomas L White Jr, Mr and Mrs William John Robb III,  Mr and Mrs David R Patterson, Mr and Mrs Thomas S Stukes, Dr and Mrs Lloyd J Peterson  and Mr William M Hicks, for Borana Conservancy in Kenya, home to the country’s newest population of black rhino.

£952 to Dambari Wildlife Trust in Zimbabwe, which included a grant of 1,000 euros from Zoom Torino in Italy, the first time that this zoo has supported rhino conservation through us. The funds will help cover the cost of reprinting the ranger rhino sigh