A rhino in the Borana Conservancy, Kenya. A rhino in the Borana Conservancy, Kenya.

A huge thank you to all of our supporters and donors for making the following grants possible

Here are the grants that Save the Rhino has made to programmes within the last 12 months.

Click on the months below to find out more about our recent grants.

More information on how we spend money can be found in our Audited Accounts on the Charity Commission’s website and Impact reports (latest copy viewable here).

If you’d like to understand more about our funding priorities, take a look at our grant-making policy. Further guidelines on applying for a grant can be found here.

We sent out £72,651-worth of grants as follows:

£5,072 to the Big Life Foundation in Kenya, thanks to a grant of £5,000 from the Ernest Kleinwort Charitable Trust and small donations via our website for ranger wages and incentives.

Thanks to grants totalling €10,000 from Berlin Zoo and Tierpark Berlin, we were able to support Education for Nature Vietnam’s project entitled “Promote public participation in efforts to reduce rhino horn consumption in Vietnam”.

We sent a total of £1,000 (£713 from restricted donations and £287 from our core funds) to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe for the entry of rhino monitoring data into LRT’s database.

We sent a series of grants totalling £9,200 to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, for work in Etosha National Park, thanks to a grant from the Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and The Duke and Duchess of Sussex: $1,590 for cables, chainsaws, trimming discs, saw blades etc.; $6,877 for drugs to be used during rhino operations; $549 to for ropes for restraining, loading and slinging of immobilized animals, to replace worn-out ropes, needed for translocation operations in November 2018; $1,513 for medical oxygen needed during immobilizations to keep the animals’ blood oxygen levels high (these cylinders are lightweight to enable them to be carried in the helicopter during capture operations; and $1,363 for security-style cameras that are fitted in the rhino crates during transport to check all the time on the wellbeing of the animals.

Rafiki wa Faru, the black-rhino-focused environmental education programme based at the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania that we have supported since it began in 2008, received a total of £16,925 for running costs for the period July 2018 to June 2019, thanks to grants of $20,425 from USFWS and £2,664 from our own core funds.

We also support Lolesha Luangwa, another black-rhino-focused conservation education programme run by the North Luangwa Conservation Programme. We awarded £22,879 for its running costs for the period July 2018 to June 2019, thanks to grants of $22,750 from USFWS, $2,275 from our own core funds and £3,650 from funds raised by last year’s appeal.

We spent £3,737 on our report, Sounding the Horn: A survey of rhino horn antiques sold in 2017 at auction in the UK, co-authored by SRI volunteer Sue Brace and CEO Cathy Dean. The report documents all lots described as definitely, probably or possibly made of rhino horn, and identifies significant loopholes in the system that may facilitate the laundering of modern rhino horn.

Finally, we sent £5,005 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, thanks to donations of £2,660 received in misc. donations for SRT and another £2,345 from our own core funds, to be used to pay informers for intelligence leading to the interception of poachers.

As always, our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

We sent out a massive £388,451 as follows:

$14,825 to fund production, printing and posting of issue 59 of Pachyderm, the Journal of the African and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups and the African Elephant Specialist Group, thanks to a grant received from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Limited.

The ForRangers initiative enabled us to make a further payment of $17,786.06 to Almar Container Group, to complete the purchase of 4 x 20-ft container gyms and for transport to Borana, Lewa Wildlife and Ol Jogi Conservancies, to support rangers’ health, fitness and morale.

We sent several grants to Borana Conservancy in Kenya, including $1,000 from the Victoria Sujata Charitable Fund, $10,000 from Didi McNabb, £375 received in miscellaneous restricted donations, which will all help cover Borana’s ongoing operating cost. A grant of £2,500 from the Mackintosh Foundation will support annual refresher and commander cadre ranger training courses, as will grants of $41,551 from USFWS and $4,255 from our own core funds.

As ever, we had several donors wishing to support Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, where our grants are used to buy camping, monitoring and law enforcement equipment, as well as renovations and improvements to accommodation and ablution blocks. Our thanks to Le Pal Nature Foundation (€5,000), Just Wheels & Tires Co / TSW Alloy Wheels (£2,088) whose support will help cover aerial surveillance, USFWS ($59,077), and other donations (£170.64) received via our website. We added a further $5,908 from our own core funds.

USFWS’s year-two grant for the canine unit project being managed by the Ministry of Environment and Tourism allowed us to send a further $16,000 to the trainer, Invictus K9, for follow-on training of the unit (dogs and handlers). We also sent $7,798.33 received from our sister organization, SRI Inc., to pay for water pumps etc. for the rehabilitation of waterholes in the Intensive Protection Zone in Etosha National Park.

Another year-two grant from USFWS RTCF allowed us to send $57,074 to the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania for tracker salaries, the canine unit and uniforms and boots, to which we added $4,689 from our own core funds.

We sent $27,090, thanks to a major 2-year grant from the Wildcat Foundation, to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia for ranger training.

We sent a total of £48,922 to Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya, which is home to white rhino as well as a Key 2 population of black rhino, thanks to grants of $45,596 from USFWS for annual refresher and medic and commander cadre courses, $6,500 from the Feldman Family ($5,000 of which will go towards Ol Jogi’s education programme and the other $1,500 towards its rhino conservation activities), and €10,000 euros from Zoo-Berlin and Tierpark Berlin, to be used to improve ranger accommodation especially roofing.

We sent $7,976 from USFWS RTCF for the Regional Canine Coordinator project, led by Kirsty Brebner. It’s been very good to see communications continuing frequently between those who participated in the workshop we held back in April.

We sent a total of £80,979 to Save the Rhino Trustin Namibia, thanks to: 2,068.70 raised by Desert Cycle Namibia team; £977 received in miscellaneous donations; $92,351 from USFWS for rations, uniforms and vehicle running costs, and $9,235 from our own core funds.

Finally, we sent a number of grants to uMkhuze Game Reserve in South Africa: €7,500 from Stichting Wildlife; $41,684 from USFWS for vehicle tyres and equipment, recycling bins and gym equipment for ranger posts, ration packs, insect repellent and hydration bladders; and $4,168 from our own core funds to buy pool tables, dart boards and soccer tables for ranger posts, to help keep morale high.

We sent out a very pleasing £208,614 as follows:

A total of £8,619 to the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya, for the Emergency fund for black rhinos, which reimburses conservancies 50% of the veterinary and boma-care costs incurred by rhinos requiring treatment, whether due to being orphaned or injured by poaching attempts or intra-species fighting. Our thanks to Le Pal Nature Foundation (€5,000), Rhino’s energy (€2,000), the Victoria Sujata Charitable Fund ($3,000) and other donors for their support.

We also awarded a new grant to Education for Nature-Vietnam for its project entitled “Promote public participation in efforts to reduce rhino horn consumption in Viet Nam”, thanks to funds received from the Zoo de la Barben (€4,000), the Simon Gibson Charitable Trust (£5,000) and miscellaneous restricted donations (£150).

We sent £50 to our partners, the International Rhino Foundation for Indian Rhino Vision 2020. As the Greater one-horned rhino is classified by the IUCN Red List as Vulnerable, it is not as high a priority for us as the Critically Endangered Species, and we no longer list this project on our website. However some donors give small monthly donations and we wish to honour their intentions.

We also sent the IRF £858 received in donations via our website for the Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area in Indonesia. Fundraising is harder for the rarely seen, comparatively little-known Javan and Sumatran rhino species.

We sent $1,000 from core funds to a project to explore parts of South Sudan in the hope that a few Northern white rhinos might somehow have survived decades of civil war. If any trace or spoor (dung, footprints etc.) is found, a full-scale search would be mounted and conservation plan drawn up by a consortium of NGOs.

We spent £79 on costs relating to the publication and launch in October of new research into the UK trade in rhino horn antiques.

We awarded £4,090 to the IRF for the Rhino Protection Unit programme, thanks to a very generous donation of £4,000 by Keith Richardson, as well as other smaller gifts by donors, and £785 for the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, located in Way Kambas National Park in the southern tip of Sumatra, Indonesia.

Thanks to the generosity of one of our long-time supporters, Peter Lawrence, who nominated Save the Rhino as one of the beneficiaries of the Betty Liebert Trust, we were able to make a series of three grants to demand reduction efforts in China and Viet Nam.

The first grant, of £44,988, went to our partner, TRAFFIC-China, for a project entitled “Save the rhino through social media”.

The two other grants all went to TRAFFIC-Viet Nam: £74,198 for a project called “Reducing the demand for rhino horn in the Vietnamese communist party and government”; and £73,838 for “Reducing the demand for ivory & rhino horn from Chinese tourists in Viet Nam”. Our very grateful thanks to Peter and Birgit for their support.

We sent out a very pleasing £242,925 as follows:

Thanks to a grant from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Ltd, we were able to put down a deposit of $10,052 to secure the venue for the February 2019 African Rhino Specialist Group meeting in Namibia. These meetings take place every 2-3 years, and are a vital forum for sharing information, discussing rhino conservation issues, gathering data for CITES reporting etc., involving some 50 Members and 20 observers.

We sent $16,337 from a USFWS grant and $1,633 from our own core funds for the continued work of the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries’ Administrator. This person is based in the Kenya Wildlife Service’s headquarters in Nairobi, and forms a vital link between the private and public sector in terms of implementing Kenya’s national black rhino strategy.

We sent several grants from funds raised by the ForRangers initiative. £31,320 paid for gym equipment for Lewa Wildlife, Borana and Ol Jogi conservancies (bumpers, resistance bands, kettlebells, gym rings etc.) and a further £1,475 paid for the shipping of this equipment from the UK to Nairobi. $5,000 went to Bio-Ken, the James Ashe Anti-venom Trust for supplies of life-saving anti-venom for Kenyan conservancies. And $20,000 went to Africa Nature Investors for ranger uniforms in Gashaka Gumti National Park in Nigeria.

Big Life Foundation in Kenya benefited from $45,090 from USFWS and $4,509 from our own core funds for its ongoing rhino monitoring and protection work in the Chyulu Hills National Park in Kenya.

We use $4,361 from funds raised by the ForRangers initiative and another $11,000 from Lewa Wildlife Conservancy via ForRangers to achieve a good deal by paying centrally on converted shipping containers, to act as gyms at each of the Lewa Wildlife, Borana and Ol Jogi Conservancies. We also sent a donation of $30,000 from Stuart and Joanna Brown via our US-based sister organisation, Save the Rhino International Inc., to pay for CPL training for Lewa’s head of rhino monitoring, Ian Lemaiyan.

We sent $66,514 to pay for equipment for a project organised by Namibia’s Ministry of Environment and Tourism, which will help track and analyse poaching hotspots in key National Parks, thanks to a very generous grant from the Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and The Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

The Wildcat Foundation’s support enabled us to make several grants to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia: $16,000 for purchase of a 1 x Daf 4×4 dropside cargo truck that will be used for the scouts’ monthly shopping trips; $27,090 for the next round of ranger training for the Rhino and Elephant Protection Unit; and $21,999 for various patrol equipment items. We also sent £2,871 received in miscellaneous restricted donations to pay for the purchase and shipping of a secondhand HIAB144B-2CL lifting to be fitted to NLCP’s existing Mercedes truck for rhino transporting and lifting; and another £661, thanks to Peter Lawrence, for a vHF horn implant to be used when the hoped-for exchange of one or two rhinos between Zambia and Zimbabwe takes place.

Finally, we used £3,791 from ForRangers’ fundraising efforts to pay for Aimpoint red-dot optical rifle sights for the Northern Rangelands Trust in Kenya.

We awarded a total of £91,060 as follows:

We were very pleased to be able to make a grant of £26,165 from funds raised by the ForRangers initiative to pay for group life insurance for rangers working for multiple conservancies in Kenya and Tanzania. If rangers are killed or injured in the line of duty, we want to be sure that their hospital treatment and families are taken care of.

We sent grants totalling £14,665 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, thanks to: £6,678 from Colchester Zoo Action for the Wild for tactical training for the Anti-Poaching Unit rangers and officers, as well as for maintaining canine unit facilities, dog care (such as veterinary care, food and equipment) & canine unit administration (including retraining for handlers & travel expenses); $8,491 and another £1,000 from Just Wheels & Tires Co / TSW Alloy Wheels for aerial surveillance over the Park; and £162 and $687 received in miscellaneous restricted donations for kit and equipment for Hluhluwe-iMfolozi’s rangers.

We covered the quarterly cost of entering rhino monitoring data by Lowveld Rhino Trust staff in Zimbabwe thanks to donations received for £424 and other £176 from our own core funds.

We sent a total of £40,010 for three projects being run by Namibia’s Ministry of Environment and Tourism. The first of these is to establish a canine unit in the country, that can be deployed to track poachers and to work as detection dogs at ports of entry, park gates and roadblocks. $27,583 from USFWS and $3,862 from our own core funds paid for the purchase and shipping of the dogs from the Netherlands to Namibia. We made further payments for the annual dehorning operations, including $2,483 from core funds for the services of a pilot for the fixed-wing aircraft needed, and another $3,094 from core funds for helicopter hours for an emergency operation in the Kliprivier area. Finally, we paid $14,826 from USFWS funds and $1,002 from core funds for the costs associated with a project to fit rhinos with satellite collars and tags in vulnerable areas and to use data from those to model potential poaching hotspots.

We paid another $1,690 from USFWS funds for the international flight costs of one of the professional canine trainers who attended the Working Dogs conference in Johannesburg in April 2018.

Finally, we sent £8,346 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia for ongoing rhino monitoring costs, thanks to the efforts of participants in the 2018 Desert Cycle Namibia (Alex Hearn, Joey Ritblat and Peter Buxton) as well as other restricted donations received via our website.

We awarded a total of £65,677 as follows:

We sent £14,772 to Big Game Parks in Swaziland, thanks to readers of Sporting Rifle magazine, who donated and then bid for lots in its 2017 charity auction. The funds will be used for repairs to / replacement of components from the rhino-capture-trailer axle; the balance will go towards work on 12 security watch towers in Mkhaya Game Reserve and Hlane Royal National Park, with protective steel plating in the guard chamber at top of the towers.

We sent a total of £10,444 to pay invoices raised by Namibia’s Ministry of Environment and Tourism for its annual rhino dehorning operations that deter poachers. USFWS funds were used to pay for a combo grinder and generator petrol ($847) and helicopter hours ($11,334) and we paid for further chopper time ($2,446) from our own core funds.

$27,090 from the Wildcat Foundation paid for the next round of training for the North Luangwa Conservation Programme’s Rhino and Elephant Protection Unit. A regular cycle keeps rangers sharp and motivated.

$3,303 from our core funds paid for flights for two attendees at the Working Dogs workshop held in April 2018 in Johannesburg, which was highly praised by all participants. We also distributed rhino badges etc. worth £43 to attendees.

As usual, we made an annual grant of £1,000 from our core funds to the Rhino Resource Center, whose website, http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/ is an excellent reference base for researchers, students, NGOs and field programme personnel.

Finally, we sent $25,000 received from the Glen and Bobbie Ceiley Foundation, the fourth such annual grant, to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, for North West Namibia security workshops, trackers’ rations and vehicle running costs.

We awarded £138,230 in grants, which broke down as follows:

We sent a total of US $8,375 for the production of the next issue of Pachyderm, the Journal of the African Elephant, African Rhino and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups, thanks to grants from the Oak Foundation and Save the Elephants.

We were able to award a total of £22,396 to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, for its rhino monitoring and community calf incentives programmes in Save and Bubye Valley Conservancies, thanks to grants of €14,340 from Dublin Zoo, €2,000 from Rhino’s energy, £1,000 from David Hale, and donations to our Great Land Share appeal.

We paid $65,717, thanks to a grant from USFWS RTCF, for veterinary and helicopter support for the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, for its annual rhino management operations that include dehorning, ear-notching, micro-chipping and DNA-sampling.

We sent another $56,300 from USFWS and $1,500 from our core funds to pay for the establishment of a canine unit in Namibia. Invictus K9 is providing the initial training, handler selection and then 8-week detection and 6-week tracking dog courses.

$18,627, again thanks to a grant from USFWS RTCF, paid for part of the costs of a Working Dogs conference that we, together with coordinator Kirsty Brebner, are organising in Johannesburg in early April. Some 45 people from wildlife conservation programmes in central, eastern and southern Africa, together with training providers and vets, will convene for a 4-day workshop to share best practice on canine husbandry, training, live deployments and interaction with a range of stakeholders, from the judiciary to local communities.

We sent £1,200 to the Rhino Fund Uganda, thanks to a grant from For Rangers and misc. dons. Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary recently saw the birth of the fifth calf to white rhino Kori, and another four calves are due in 2018.

Finally, we sent a total of £5,466 to the Long Run in Kenya, thanks to a donation by Andy Parker and to funds raised at the 2017 For Rangers dinner.

We sent out £25,070 in grants, which was split as follows:

£1,828 for Big Life Foundation in Kenya, to pay for a solar power upgrade for one of the outposts in the Chyulu Hills National Park, thanks to a donation of £1,460 from Camilla le May in honour of the For Rangers initiative and other misc. donations.

ZAR 17,000 from our core funds for Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, for anti-poaching work. KwaZulu-Natal has been hit particularly hard by poachers as security measures in Kruger National Park have been tightened.

£74 for Greater one-horned rhinos in Assam, India, as part of the Indian Rhino Vision 2020 project, for which we route donations via our friend and partner, the International Rhino Foundation.

£634 (including a donation of £401 received from Mareike Poelzer) for the Javan Rhino Conservation and Study Area in Indonesia. This will be used to help clear the invasive Arenga palm, which is adversely impacting the growth of plant species used as food by Javan rhinos.

We awarded another £60,700 in grants, which broke down as follows:

We sent a total of £6,977 to the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya, for its Emergency Fund for black rhinos, which reimburses conservancies for 50% of the costs incurred in treating orphaned calves or those needing veterinary care. $2,600 of this came from GreaterGood.org, £2,000 from the Marjorie Coote Animal Charity Trust and £3,000 from the Swire Charitable Trust. A small surplus will carry forward to help cover costs incurred during 2017-18, in that claims are necessarily made retrospectively.

We sent $1,439 from core funds to pay for travel expenses incurred by 10 rangers from the Kenya Wildlife Service in attending the managing informants course in October.

We forwarded $1,000 to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, thanks to a generous donation by long-time supporter Walt Brown. (We are holding other funds for the Lowveld Rhino Trust and will forward them once the banking situation is resolved; the currency issues have made transactions particularly difficult.)

We sent $48,722 from a USFWS grant and added another $3,978 from core funds to pay for new satellite and tag bracelets for the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia.

We sent $840 from Wildcat Foundation’s large grant to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, to pay for patrol equipment and accessories.

We awarded a lovely £10,106 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, thanks to donations received from Cotswold Wildlife Park (£1,000, for rations / vehicles), Journeys by Design (£6,100), which donated a holiday that we auctioned at our annual dinner, and other funds received via SRT’s online fundraising page and raised by Terry Driscoll, who is climbing Mt Kilimanjaro to raise funds for SRT.

Finally, we donated £1,200 to The Long Run, a UK-based charity that works with conservation programmes around the world, linked by the 4 ‘C’s: conservation, commerce, culture and community, thanks to the auction of two donated lots at our annual dinner in September.

Our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

We sent out a pleasing £107,888.36 in grants, which broke down as follows:

£11,510 to Pachyderm, the Journal of the IUCN SSC African Elephant, African Rhino and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups, thanks to grants from Save the Elephants ($4,869), the African Fund for Endangered Wildlife ($7,500) and the Oak Foundation ($2,795). These grants completed the funding for the editing, production, printing and mailing of issue no. 58 of Pachyderm.

We sent $5,763 from USFWS to trainer Wayne Evans, for equipment for participants in the course on managing informants, delivered in Kenya in October 2017. Run through the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries, the course included participants from the Kenya Wildlife Service as well as from programmes in Uganda, Rwanda and Zambia.

We sent £3,179 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, which is home to important populations of black and white rhino. Our thanks to Niel Joubert for his donation of £1,500, to the Zoo de la Boissiere du Dore for its grant of 1,500 euros, and to other donors for their support for the purchase of law enforcement and monitoring equipment.

We gave £400 from our core funds to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, to pay for four months’ worth of rhino monitoring data entry from Save Valley Conservancy and Bubye Valley Conservancy. Keeping on top of rhino sightings data means that any ‘missing’ animals can quickly be identified and followed up.

The North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia received a total of £19,168, thanks to a grant of $23,705 (the first installment from a total 2-year grant of $48,100) from Disney Conservation Fund for Lolesha Luangwa ongoing costs during 2017-18. Lolesha Luangwa is a black-rhino-focused environmental education programme that targets children living in villages surrounding the national park. We also sent $1,571 from core funds to pay the travel and visa costs for 4 NLCP officers to attend managing informants course in Kenya.

We sent £5,256 to the Rhino Fund Uganda, which included a grant from core funds of $1,255 to cover the travel costs incurred by the two Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary staff attending the managing informants course in Kenya, a total of £4,020 raised via the auction of two volunteer experiences at our annual dinner in September, and another £275 received in miscellaneous donations via our website.

Finally, we sent a total of £63,923 to the Zambezi Society in Zimbabwe, thanks togrants and donations from WildCRU, the Balmain Foundation, Peter Taylor, Decon Laboratories, Ken Wachs and other individual donors.

Our thanks to everyone who made these possible.