A rhino in the Borana Conservancy, Kenya. A rhino in the Borana Conservancy, Kenya.

A huge thank you to all of our supporters and donors for making the following grants possible

Here are the grants that Save the Rhino has made to programmes within the last 12 months.

Click on the months below to find out more about our recent grants.

More information on how we spend money can be found in our Audited Accounts on the Charity Commission’s website and Impact reports (latest copy viewable here).

If you’d like to understand more about our funding priorities, take a look at our grant-making policy. Further guidelines on applying for a grant can be found here.

We sent out £14,713 in grants as follows:

£12 in miscellaneous merchandise was donated to Lewa Wildlife Conservancy during our Partnership Manager Michaela Butorova’s visit in May 2019.

We gave £1,400 from core funds to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, to pay for the entry of rhino monitoring data from October 2018 to April 2019 inclusive in Lowveld Rhino Trust’s database.

The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and The Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s grant for Etosha National Park in Namibia, run by the Ministry of Environment and Tourism, enabled us to make a part-payment of $5,733 for Etosha’s canine unit at the Anti-Poaching Unit’s camp in the Park.

£11 in miscellaneous merchandise was donated to Ol Jogi Conservancy during our Partnership Manager Michaela Butorova’s visit in May 2019.

Finally, we spent £8,813 on the Working Dogs Workshop held in May 19 in Nairobi, and an associated visit by some of the workshop participants to Ol Jogi and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies. $9,914 of this came from the grant from Working Dogs for Conservation; the other £1,104 came from our own core funds.

Thank you to all our lovely donors!

We sent out a total of £47,883 in grants as follows:

We sent £4,517 from the Tristan Voorspuy Charitable Trust to the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries for the For Rangers initiative, to pay for the international freight costs of equipment bought for a number of conservancies in Laikipia.

We also sent £5,000 from the Tristan Voorspuy Charitable Trust to Borana Conservancy in Laikipia, Kenya, to pay for basic training for four recently recruited rangers (they replaced two who retired, and another two who were killed in action). Another £3,250 donated by Fred Clark, who held an exhibition to raise funds for Borana, and a further £1,506 from various donors will pay for uniforms for the general security team (including boots, socks, shirt, trousers, jacket, belt and beret); Borana has recently employed 13 female rangers who work on fence patrols and at the security gates, so this will help equip them.

We have several donors who continue to fundraise for the three canine units based in Laikipia, and were able to send €1,333 and £388 to Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, thanks to Rotterdam Zoo, Fundacion Bioparc Valencia, West Midland Safari Park and other donors.

The Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia received a total of £6,169 for work in Etosha National Park, which is home to substantial populations of black and white rhinos. The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and The Duke and Duchess of Sussex awarded $818 for Bernd Brell’s costs incurred in attending the Working Dogs Workshop in May 2019 in Nairobi, Kenya; another $2,112 for people to attend a workshop in Etosha NP itself; and $4,192 for work on SMART (Spatial Monitoring And Reporting Tool) across Namibian national parks and conservancies. We also awarded $853 from our own core funds for the SMART work.

As for Lewa, we sent funds to Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya for its canine unit: €1,333 and £388 to Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, thanks to Rotterdam Zoo, Fundacion Bioparc Valencia, West Midland Safari Park and other donors. We also sent €2,430 from Foundation Lutreola / Tallinn Zoo to purchase infra-red CCTV for Ol Jogi’s wildlife corridors: gaps in the fence that allow animals (apart from rhinos) to move from one section of the Conservancy to another.

We also awarded funds to Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya for its canine unit; more than for Lewa and Ol Jogi as we’d got funds held over from the previous year. Once again, our thanks to Rotterdam Zoo, Fundacion Bioparc Valencia, West Midland Safari Park and other donors for enabling us to send €2,684 and £803.

Save the Rhino’s Partnerships Manager, Michaela Butorova, was heavily involved in organising a Working Dogs Workshop to follow up the previous one in April 2018 in Johannesburg. This meeting was in Nairobi in May 2019, part-funded by a $30,000 grant from Working Dogs for Conservation, which we used to pay for flights for participants on bursaries and for conference fees. In April we spent £4,288 from WD4C, and also allocated £431 from our core funds to enable international expert Steve White, from the American Society of Canine Trainers, to visit Lewa Wildlife Conservancy before the workshop, to see Lewa’s canine unit in action.

As in previous years, we awarded £1,000 from our core funds to the Rhino Resource Center, which is an invaluable online reference source for rhino conservationists, field practitioners and students alike. http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/

Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia is enjoying a sustained period with zero rhino poaching (none killed since August 2017, at the time of writing), due to a range of factors, including engagement with local communities, but also to the intelligence network set up by SRT’s Wildlife Crime Coordinator. We sent £3,643 thanks to a number of donors, including Anna-Maria de Roij van Zuijdewijn and €1,000 euros from Zoo Krefeld for informer payments.

Lastly, we sent €10,254 to uMkhuze Game Reserve in South Africa, thanks to a very generous donation from Ales Weiner. This will pay for two LoRaWAN towers and 29 personal / vehicle protection devices, which will use the LoRaWAN network to manage the deployment of the reserve’s assets.

As always, our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

We sent out a total of £156,008 in grants as follows:

The Victoria Sujata Charitable Fund awarded a grant of $4,050 to pay for 6 complete sets of camping equipment for field rangers in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, when on extended patrols.

Thanks to donations of €2,000 from Rotterdam Zoo and €1,400 from Parc Animalier de Branfere, we were able to support training courses to build capacity in Assam, India, as part of the Indian Rhino Vision 2020 project.

We sent $10,000 raised by participants in the 2018 For Rangers Ultra to Lewa Wildlife Conservancy in Kenya. $4,800 of this paid for equipment for the armed security team (40 x bedrolls, sleeping bags and mosquito nets) and another $5,200 paid for solar power at outposts used by the general security team.

We paid £149 from core funds for website hosting and site renewal costs for the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe.

We gave a total of £100,913 to Namibia’s Ministry of Environment and Tourism, for three concurrent projects. £58,587 went to pay multiple suppliers’ invoices for costs relating to the ongoing dehorning programme, thanks to a grant from USFWS. The Namibian government has adopted a policy of dehorning as many rhinos as possible in order to deter poachers; this exercise must be repeated every 2-3 years as the horn grows back. Another £42,062 went to a project located in Etosha National Park, where a grant from The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and The Duke and Duchess of Sussex is paying for further equipment, waterhole rehabilitation, and predictive modelling of rhino density and poaching hotspots. Finally, £263 paid for flights for the manufacturer of satellite tags used in ankle bracelets to visit Namibia to assist with their removal, after a period of intensive tracking / monitoring the rhino thus fitted.

We used £1,048 from miscellaneous restricted donations to pay for flights for Richard Hennery from the UK to North Luangwa in Zambia, for his annual detailed review of Lolesha Luangwa, the black-rhino-focused environmental education programme. The project has just recruited Henry Sikapite as Communities Education Officer, who now line manages Michael Eliko and provides direction to the expanding community engagement work. Richard, meanwhile, based his MSc on Lolesha Luangwa, and continues to mentor and guide the programme, with academic rigour in his monitoring and evaluation of its effectiveness.

We sent a total of $22,700 to Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya. $1,000 of this was from Frances Barkley Hickox, and will help pay for a freezer inverter and battery for a rhino endocrinology study that Ol Jogi is to undertake. $10,000 from Matthew and Jessica Upchurch is being put towards the maintenance and replacement of water pipes that serve rhinos, other wildlife and rangers. $1,700 from the Victoria Sujata Charitable Trust is going towards the construction of a new ranger house, shower, kitchen and toilet block. And $10,000 raised by participants in the 2018 For Rangers Ultra paid for 62 pairs of boots, 5 uniforms, 10 Garmin GPSs, cases & carabiners, 6 digital cameras and one1 infra-red CCTV system on the wildlife corridors within Ol Jogi.

A total of £8,524 from the grant of $30,000 raised by Working Dogs for Conservation was used to pay for flights and hotel / conference fees for bursary participants the second working dogs workshop that we are organising, this time in Nairobi in May 2019. The previous workshop, held in April 2018 in Johannesburg, was so well-received that we decided to repeat it, with variations, for a largely different set of participants.

We sent £10,325 to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia, to help cover its ongoing operating costs. Our thanks to Rhino’s energy (€2,018), Wilhelma Zoo Stuttgart (€5,000) and Foundation Lutreola / Tallinn Zoo (€5,000) for their fantastic support that made this grant possible.

Finally, we sent £5,935 to Welgevonden Game Reserve in South Africa, representing 50% of the funds raised by Bradley Schroder, who has run multiple marathons and ultra marathons in rhino costume during the past year. Welgevonden is home to white and black rhinos, and we are very pleased to be able to support the site in this way.

As ever, our heartfelt thanks to all our donors and supporters, who made it possible to give out more than £1.8 million during our financial year 2018-19.

We sent out a total of £66,971 in grants as follows:

£1,028 from the USFWS grant to the African Rhino Specialist Group for its 2019 meeting in Namibia, to pay for a further international flight, local transfers and transit hotel costs in Windhoek.

$3,230 from the $7,982 grant received from Save the Elephants for the production costs of Pachyderm, the journal of the African and Asian Rhino and African Elephant Specialist Groups.

We sent out £37,064 to the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries, thanks to a grant from the Tristan Voorspuy Charitable Trust in honour of the For Rangers Initiative. £15,016.80 paid for equipment for rangers at Suyian, Sosian, Ol Maisor, Ol Donyo Lemboro and Kinamba Village community scouts: Camelbaks, bergens, webbings, socks, GPS, medical packs, torches, hats, gloves, head torches etc. And £22,047.02 paid for equipment for rangers: Tshirts, camouflage Tshirts, camouflage jackets, green shirts, trousers, jackets and bush hats, trouser belts, boots and navy jumpers.

In response to the forest fires on Mt Kenya, we sent $5,000 from funds raised by the For Rangers initiative to the Bill Woodley Mt Kenya Company, for ranger equipment to help tackle the fires.

Thanks to a legacy from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust, we were able to send a total of $26,161.49 to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism, to upgrade rhino capture equipment, translocation operations and water provision for rhino in Etosha and Mangetti National Parks, Nyae Nyae Conservancy and Waterberg Plateau Park.

Finally, we sent a further £2,360 from Peter Lawrence’s very generous donation to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme, to pay for the final costs of the rhino translocation from Zimbabwe to Zambia: veterinarian Chris Foggin’s time and the drugs used in the immobilisation.

We sent out a total of £175,982.29 in grants as follows:

£45,333, thanks to grants from WWF-South Africa, USFWS, the International Rhino Foundation, Oak Philanthropy (UK) Ltd and our sister organisation Save the Rhino International Inc., to the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group, to pay for flights to Namibia for the 2019 meeting, and for accommodation, board and conference fees at the meeting venue, Gross Barmen. These meetings take place every 2-3 years and provide a vital forum for the exchange of information and ideas, and to develop strategies to aid rhino conservation efforts. 71 people from 18 different countries attended the 6-day meeting.

With funds raised by the For Rangers initiative, we were able to send a total of £7,284 to the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya. $7,315 of this went on purchasing and shipping gym equipment for the ‘container’ gyms previously purchased for Lewa Wildlife, Borana and Ol Jogi Conservancies; while the remaining £1,596 bought 42 sets of green webbings for conservancies including Sosian and Loisaba.

$14,000 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust went to Big Life Foundation in Kenya, to pay for a generator to pump extra water to waterholes used by rhino and other wildlife species in the Chyulu Hills National Park, a range of volcanic hills lying to the north of Tsavo West National Park.

Another grant from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, of $27,078, went to Borana Conservancy in Kenya to buy new digital radio handsets.

$13,500 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust was sent to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa to pay for 20 complete sets of camping kit for law enforcement staff members’ extended patrols. Further grants of €1,500 euros from Zoo de la Boissière du Doré , €4,000 from Zoo Zlin and €1,000 from Friends of Berlin Zoo bought further sets of equipment (we want to try to replace 120 sets altogether this year and next).

Yet another grant from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, this time of $8,285, went to Lewa Wildlife Conservancy to fund the installation of solar power units at four field ranger camps.

€5,328.93 from long-term supporter Dublin Zoo went to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe to help cover the cost of rhino monitoring work in Bubye Valley Conservancy. Bubye has important populations of black and white rhino.

$16,000 from a grant from USFWS paid for the next round of training of the Ministry of Environment’s canine unit (dogs and handlers) in Namibia. Invictus K9 provides the dogs, training and follow-up support service.

A grant of $19,900 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust went to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, to pay for the construction of two pickets and boreholes in North Luangwa National Park, to further support the protection of the growing rhino population there. We also used £1,678 from the Wildcat Foundation’s grant to pay for two rangers to fly to London in April, to take part in the 2019 Virgin London Marathon, as part of NLCP’s incentives and rewards initiative. Being selected to travel to London, to take part in the world-famous race, is a tremendous morale-boost for North Luangwa’s rangers. It also encourages them to work hard at their physical fitness!

The final grant from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust for 2019, of $19,511, went to Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya to pay for refresher training for its rangers, to be delivered by 51 Degrees Ltd.

Lastly, we were delighted to be able to make the first of four grants of $25,000 to the International Rhino Foundation for the Sumatran Rhino Rescue Project in Indonesia. The full $100,000 is coming from our core funds, thanks to the generosity of our donors, who left decisions as to the use of their donations for our Trustees to determine. We are truly grateful to all our supporters for enabling us to contribute to this exciting initiative as one of the Project’s Strategic Partners.

We sent out a total of £55,111.88 in grants as follows:

£7,805, thanks to grants from USFWS, the International Rhino Foundation and Oak Philanthropy (UK) Ltd, to the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group, to pay for flights to Namibia for the 2019 meeting. These meetings take place every 2-3 years and provide a vital forum for the exchange of information and ideas, and to develop strategies to aid rhino conservation efforts.

Another $1,067 from a USFWS grant went to help cover subsistence and travel costs for the Chair of the African Rhino Specialist Group, Dr Mike Knight, relating to other meetings in his capacity as Chair of the Group.

We spent $7,198 from core funds on migrating data to a new software package for intelligence gathering and analysis in Kenya, to help tackle rhino and elephant poaching.

Thanks to a grant from Peter Lawrence, we were able to cover the costs of translocating two male black rhinos from Zimbabwe to North Luangwa National Park in Zambia. The Zimbabwean animals originate from the Zambezi Valley population of Diceros bicornis minor, which have much greater genetic diversity that those from the KwaZulu-Natal population. £11,577 paid for the specialised handling of the two rhino including all transport and border fees, and Kerax truck-crane hire assistance with loading, transport & offloading of the animals from Livingstone to NLNP.

We sent €3,000 received from Hannover Zoo in Germany to Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya, where it is being used to build new ranger housing. Ol Jogi’s workshop manager is experimenting with different materials and methods of construction to establish the most cost- and time-effective approach.

Thanks to funds raised by participants in the 2018 For Rangers Ultra, we were able to send £10,000 to Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya. This grant paid for 60 pairs of tactical boots and jerseys, 10 pairs of gum boots, 8 raincoats, 5 pairs of safari boots, 1 order of kitchen utensils, 2 pairs of night-vision goggles and 20 high-beam torches for Ol Pejeta’s armed ranger teams.

We sent £1,375 to Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary / Rhino Fund Uganda, thanks to enthusiastic bidding by Wills Hughes-Wilson on a volunteering experience at our annual dinner’s auction.

Finally, we sent a total of $19,100 to Wildlife Crime Prevention, thanks to grants of $15,000 from our sister organisation, Save the Rhino International Inc., and $4,100 from regular partner the International Rhino Foundation. This grant will pay for a special investigation into rhino horn trafficking.

We sent out a total of £252,156.40 in grants as follows:

£4,541, thanks to a grant from USFWS, to the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group, to pay for flights to Namibia for the 2019 Group meeting. These meetings take place every 2-3 years and provide a vital forum for the exchange of information and ideas, and to develop strategies to aid rhino conservation efforts.

£7,743.42 went to Pachyderm, the Journal of the African and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups and the African Elephant Specialist Group, thanks to grants received from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Limited (the last $6,171.99 from its $25,000 grant), £2,158.27 from the John Aspinall Foundation, and $1,018 from our own core funds.

£13,275.32 to the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group, to pay for the Scientific Officer’s consultancy fees, and travel and subsistence, thanks to grants from USFWS ($1,269) and Oak Philanthropy (UK) Ltd ($15,778). The Specialist Group works with all African countries in which rhinos are found, providing the most comprehensive scientific evidence and information possible to CITES in advance of the Convention’s Conference of the Parties every three years. As well as sharing information on best practice for maximum growth of rhino populations and other developments in rhino conservation, the Group also shares knowledge about the illegal trade in rhino horn and trafficking routes.

£72,408.55 to 51 Degrees Ltd in Kenya, for intelligence work to tackle elephant and rhino poaching, thanks to grants of $90,127 from USFWS RTCF and $3,217 from our own core funds.

We sent £11,501 from funds raised by the ForRangers initiative for freight and customs clearance of gym equipment for rangers working at Lewa Wildlife, Borana and Ol Jogi Conservancies.

With £5,000 raised from the ForRangers Ultra 2018, Loisaba Conservancy in Kenya is constructing a kitchen and mess area for its National Police Reservists and Rapid Response team. A shipping container will act as a store, and attached to it will be the kitchen unit and a mess area with a roof, stone floor and half-height walls, with tables and benches for the rangers to take their meals, as well as a soft seating area where they can relax and watch TV during down-time.

£7,500 to Lolldaiga Conservancy in Kenya, to pay for equipment for its rangers, including binoculars, webbing belts, strong lightweight boots, sleeping bags and small tents for overnight guard duties at the cattle bomas, rucksacks, hand-held radios and GPS units.

£7,500 to Ole Naishu Conservancy in Kenya, to pay for 10 pairs of binoculars, 100 medical trauma kits, 40 pairs of tactical boots and 120 pairs of socks, 20 Camelbaks, 20 camouflage ponchos and 15 sets of webbing.

£7,246 for Sosian Conservancy in Kenya, to buy optics and sighting systems for Sosian’s anti-poaching units, who must be able to protect themselves against armed poachers or livestock rustlers.

£59.95 from misc. restricted donations paid for five x-monoculars for use on the Lolesha Luangwa conservation education truck, used to bring school groups into North Luangwa National Park to improve the children’s wildlife sightings.

$27,090 from the Wildcat Foundation paid for the next round of ranger training in North Luangwa National Park in Zambia. This ongoing training programme, delivered by ESPA, teaches new skills as well as refreshing those learned on previous courses. Another £798.07 from misc. restricted donations paid for new cameras, cases and SD cards to be used by the rhino monitoring teams in North Luangwa.

A wonderful grant of £16,000 from Yorkshire Wildlife Park in the UK is going to support Ol Jogi Conservancy’s rhino conservation efforts in Kenya. The money is being used to pay for 7 x UniFi Video Camera G3s, 3 x UniFi Video Camera G3-PROs, as well as transmitter and receivers, infrared extenders, wiring and surge protectors and power, as well as 4 x Scout II-320 Thermal Imagers and 1 x Scout II-640 Thermal Imager to help increase the security team’s ability to respond to security threats or incidents and support them in protecting black and white rhinos.

Finally, we sent $100,000 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, thanks to a legacy from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust, for operating expenses in the financial year 2018-19: tracker rations and salaries, and vehicle running costs.

As ever, our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

We sent out £72,651-worth of grants as follows:

£5,072 to the Big Life Foundation in Kenya, thanks to a grant of £5,000 from the Ernest Kleinwort Charitable Trust and small donations via our website for ranger wages and incentives.

Thanks to grants totalling €10,000 from Berlin Zoo and Tierpark Berlin, we were able to support Education for Nature Vietnam’s project entitled “Promote public participation in efforts to reduce rhino horn consumption in Vietnam”.

We sent a total of £1,000 (£713 from restricted donations and £287 from our core funds) to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe for the entry of rhino monitoring data into LRT’s database.

We sent a series of grants totalling £9,200 to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, for work in Etosha National Park, thanks to a grant from the Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and The Duke and Duchess of Sussex: $1,590 for cables, chainsaws, trimming discs, saw blades etc.; $6,877 for drugs to be used during rhino operations; $549 to for ropes for restraining, loading and slinging of immobilized animals, to replace worn-out ropes, needed for translocation operations in November 2018; $1,513 for medical oxygen needed during immobilizations to keep the animals’ blood oxygen levels high (these cylinders are lightweight to enable them to be carried in the helicopter during capture operations; and $1,363 for security-style cameras that are fitted in the rhino crates during transport to check all the time on the wellbeing of the animals.

Rafiki wa Faru, the black-rhino-focused environmental education programme based at the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania that we have supported since it began in 2008, received a total of £16,925 for running costs for the period July 2018 to June 2019, thanks to grants of $20,425 from USFWS and £2,664 from our own core funds.

We also support Lolesha Luangwa, another black-rhino-focused conservation education programme run by the North Luangwa Conservation Programme. We awarded £22,879 for its running costs for the period July 2018 to June 2019, thanks to grants of $22,750 from USFWS, $2,275 from our own core funds and £3,650 from funds raised by last year’s appeal.

We spent £3,737 on our report, Sounding the Horn: A survey of rhino horn antiques sold in 2017 at auction in the UK, co-authored by SRI volunteer Sue Brace and CEO Cathy Dean. The report documents all lots described as definitely, probably or possibly made of rhino horn, and identifies significant loopholes in the system that may facilitate the laundering of modern rhino horn.

Finally, we sent £5,005 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, thanks to donations of £2,660 received in misc. donations for SRT and another £2,345 from our own core funds, to be used to pay informers for intelligence leading to the interception of poachers.

As always, our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

We sent out a massive £388,451 as follows:

$14,825 to fund production, printing and posting of issue 59 of Pachyderm, the Journal of the African and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups and the African Elephant Specialist Group, thanks to a grant received from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Limited.

The ForRangers initiative enabled us to make a further payment of $17,786.06 to Almar Container Group, to complete the purchase of 4 x 20-ft container gyms and for transport to Borana, Lewa Wildlife and Ol Jogi Conservancies, to support rangers’ health, fitness and morale.

We sent several grants to Borana Conservancy in Kenya, including $1,000 from the Victoria Sujata Charitable Fund, $10,000 from Didi McNabb, £375 received in miscellaneous restricted donations, which will all help cover Borana’s ongoing operating cost. A grant of £2,500 from the Mackintosh Foundation will support annual refresher and commander cadre ranger training courses, as will grants of $41,551 from USFWS and $4,255 from our own core funds.

As ever, we had several donors wishing to support Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, where our grants are used to buy camping, monitoring and law enforcement equipment, as well as renovations and improvements to accommodation and ablution blocks. Our thanks to Le Pal Nature Foundation (€5,000), Just Wheels & Tires Co / TSW Alloy Wheels (£2,088) whose support will help cover aerial surveillance, USFWS ($59,077), and other donations (£170.64) received via our website. We added a further $5,908 from our own core funds.

USFWS’s year-two grant for the canine unit project being managed by the Ministry of Environment and Tourism allowed us to send a further $16,000 to the trainer, Invictus K9, for follow-on training of the unit (dogs and handlers). We also sent $7,798.33 received from our sister organization, SRI Inc., to pay for water pumps etc. for the rehabilitation of waterholes in the Intensive Protection Zone in Etosha National Park.

Another year-two grant from USFWS RTCF allowed us to send $57,074 to the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania for tracker salaries, the canine unit and uniforms and boots, to which we added $4,689 from our own core funds.

We sent $27,090, thanks to a major 2-year grant from the Wildcat Foundation, to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia for ranger training.

We sent a total of £48,922 to Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya, which is home to white rhino as well as a Key 2 population of black rhino, thanks to grants of $45,596 from USFWS for annual refresher and medic and commander cadre courses, $6,500 from the Feldman Family ($5,000 of which will go towards Ol Jogi’s education programme and the other $1,500 towards its rhino conservation activities), and €10,000 euros from Zoo-Berlin and Tierpark Berlin, to be used to improve ranger accommodation especially roofing.

We sent $7,976 from USFWS RTCF for the Regional Canine Coordinator project, led by Kirsty Brebner. It’s been very good to see communications continuing frequently between those who participated in the workshop we held back in April.

We sent a total of £80,979 to Save the Rhino Trustin Namibia, thanks to: 2,068.70 raised by Desert Cycle Namibia team; £977 received in miscellaneous donations; $92,351 from USFWS for rations, uniforms and vehicle running costs, and $9,235 from our own core funds.

Finally, we sent a number of grants to uMkhuze Game Reserve in South Africa: €7,500 from Stichting Wildlife; $41,684 from USFWS for vehicle tyres and equipment, recycling bins and gym equipment for ranger posts, ration packs, insect repellent and hydration bladders; and $4,168 from our own core funds to buy pool tables, dart boards and soccer tables for ranger posts, to help keep morale high.

We sent out a very pleasing £208,614 as follows:

A total of £8,619 to the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya, for the Emergency fund for black rhinos, which reimburses conservancies 50% of the veterinary and boma-care costs incurred by rhinos requiring treatment, whether due to being orphaned or injured by poaching attempts or intra-species fighting. Our thanks to Le Pal Nature Foundation (€5,000), Rhino’s energy (€2,000), the Victoria Sujata Charitable Fund ($3,000) and other donors for their support.

We also awarded a new grant to Education for Nature-Vietnam for its project entitled “Promote public participation in efforts to reduce rhino horn consumption in Viet Nam”, thanks to funds received from the Zoo de la Barben (€4,000), the Simon Gibson Charitable Trust (£5,000) and miscellaneous restricted donations (£150).

We sent £50 to our partners, the International Rhino Foundation for Indian Rhino Vision 2020. As the Greater one-horned rhino is classified by the IUCN Red List as Vulnerable, it is not as high a priority for us as the Critically Endangered Species, and we no longer list this project on our website. However some donors give small monthly donations and we wish to honour their intentions.

We also sent the IRF £858 received in donations via our website for the Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area in Indonesia. Fundraising is harder for the rarely seen, comparatively little-known Javan and Sumatran rhino species.

We sent $1,000 from core funds to a project to explore parts of South Sudan in the hope that a few Northern white rhinos might somehow have survived decades of civil war. If any trace or spoor (dung, footprints etc.) is found, a full-scale search would be mounted and conservation plan drawn up by a consortium of NGOs.

We spent £79 on costs relating to the publication and launch in October of new research into the UK trade in rhino horn antiques.

We awarded £4,090 to the IRF for the Rhino Protection Unit programme, thanks to a very generous donation of £4,000 by Keith Richardson, as well as other smaller gifts by donors, and £785 for the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, located in Way Kambas National Park in the southern tip of Sumatra, Indonesia.

Thanks to the generosity of one of our long-time supporters, Peter Lawrence, who nominated Save the Rhino as one of the beneficiaries of the Betty Liebert Trust, we were able to make a series of three grants to demand reduction efforts in China and Viet Nam.

The first grant, of £44,988, went to our partner, TRAFFIC-China, for a project entitled “Save the rhino through social media”.

The two other grants all went to TRAFFIC-Viet Nam: £74,198 for a project called “Reducing the demand for rhino horn in the Vietnamese communist party and government”; and £73,838 for “Reducing the demand for ivory & rhino horn from Chinese tourists in Viet Nam”. Our very grateful thanks to Peter and Birgit for their support.

We sent out a very pleasing £242,925 as follows:

Thanks to a grant from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Ltd, we were able to put down a deposit of $10,052 to secure the venue for the February 2019 African Rhino Specialist Group meeting in Namibia. These meetings take place every 2-3 years, and are a vital forum for sharing information, discussing rhino conservation issues, gathering data for CITES reporting etc., involving some 50 Members and 20 observers.

We sent $16,337 from a USFWS grant and $1,633 from our own core funds for the continued work of the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries’ Administrator. This person is based in the Kenya Wildlife Service’s headquarters in Nairobi, and forms a vital link between the private and public sector in terms of implementing Kenya’s national black rhino strategy.

We sent several grants from funds raised by the ForRangers initiative. £31,320 paid for gym equipment for Lewa Wildlife, Borana and Ol Jogi conservancies (bumpers, resistance bands, kettlebells, gym rings etc.) and a further £1,475 paid for the shipping of this equipment from the UK to Nairobi. $5,000 went to Bio-Ken, the James Ashe Anti-venom Trust for supplies of life-saving anti-venom for Kenyan conservancies. And $20,000 went to Africa Nature Investors for ranger uniforms in Gashaka Gumti National Park in Nigeria.

Big Life Foundation in Kenya benefited from $45,090 from USFWS and $4,509 from our own core funds for its ongoing rhino monitoring and protection work in the Chyulu Hills National Park in Kenya.

We use $4,361 from funds raised by the ForRangers initiative and another $11,000 from Lewa Wildlife Conservancy via ForRangers to achieve a good deal by paying centrally on converted shipping containers, to act as gyms at each of the Lewa Wildlife, Borana and Ol Jogi Conservancies. We also sent a donation of $30,000 from Stuart and Joanna Brown via our US-based sister organisation, Save the Rhino International Inc., to pay for CPL training for Lewa’s head of rhino monitoring, Ian Lemaiyan.

We sent $66,514 to pay for equipment for a project organised by Namibia’s Ministry of Environment and Tourism, which will help track and analyse poaching hotspots in key National Parks, thanks to a very generous grant from the Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and The Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

The Wildcat Foundation’s support enabled us to make several grants to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia: $16,000 for purchase of a 1 x Daf 4×4 dropside cargo truck that will be used for the scouts’ monthly shopping trips; $27,090 for the next round of ranger training for the Rhino and Elephant Protection Unit; and $21,999 for various patrol equipment items. We also sent £2,871 received in miscellaneous restricted donations to pay for the purchase and shipping of a secondhand HIAB144B-2CL lifting to be fitted to NLCP’s existing Mercedes truck for rhino transporting and lifting; and another £661, thanks to Peter Lawrence, for a vHF horn implant to be used when the hoped-for exchange of one or two rhinos between Zambia and Zimbabwe takes place.

Finally, we used £3,791 from ForRangers’ fundraising efforts to pay for Aimpoint red-dot optical rifle sights for the Northern Rangelands Trust in Kenya.

We awarded a total of £91,060 as follows:

We were very pleased to be able to make a grant of £26,165 from funds raised by the ForRangers initiative to pay for group life insurance for rangers working for multiple conservancies in Kenya and Tanzania. If rangers are killed or injured in the line of duty, we want to be sure that their hospital treatment and families are taken care of.

We sent grants totalling £14,665 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, thanks to: £6,678 from Colchester Zoo Action for the Wild for tactical training for the Anti-Poaching Unit rangers and officers, as well as for maintaining canine unit facilities, dog care (such as veterinary care, food and equipment) & canine unit administration (including retraining for handlers & travel expenses); $8,491 and another £1,000 from Just Wheels & Tires Co / TSW Alloy Wheels for aerial surveillance over the Park; and £162 and $687 received in miscellaneous restricted donations for kit and equipment for Hluhluwe-iMfolozi’s rangers.

We covered the quarterly cost of entering rhino monitoring data by Lowveld Rhino Trust staff in Zimbabwe thanks to donations received for £424 and other £176 from our own core funds.

We sent a total of £40,010 for three projects being run by Namibia’s Ministry of Environment and Tourism. The first of these is to establish a canine unit in the country, that can be deployed to track poachers and to work as detection dogs at ports of entry, park gates and roadblocks. $27,583 from USFWS and $3,862 from our own core funds paid for the purchase and shipping of the dogs from the Netherlands to Namibia. We made further payments for the annual dehorning operations, including $2,483 from core funds for the services of a pilot for the fixed-wing aircraft needed, and another $3,094 from core funds for helicopter hours for an emergency operation in the Kliprivier area. Finally, we paid $14,826 from USFWS funds and $1,002 from core funds for the costs associated with a project to fit rhinos with satellite collars and tags in vulnerable areas and to use data from those to model potential poaching hotspots.

We paid another $1,690 from USFWS funds for the international flight costs of one of the professional canine trainers who attended the Working Dogs conference in Johannesburg in April 2018.

Finally, we sent £8,346 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia for ongoing rhino monitoring costs, thanks to the efforts of participants in the 2018 Desert Cycle Namibia (Alex Hearn, Joey Ritblat and Peter Buxton) as well as other restricted donations received via our website.

We awarded a total of £65,677 as follows:

We sent £14,772 to Big Game Parks in Swaziland, thanks to readers of Sporting Rifle magazine, who donated and then bid for lots in its 2017 charity auction. The funds will be used for repairs to / replacement of components from the rhino-capture-trailer axle; the balance will go towards work on 12 security watch towers in Mkhaya Game Reserve and Hlane Royal National Park, with protective steel plating in the guard chamber at top of the towers.

We sent a total of £10,444 to pay invoices raised by Namibia’s Ministry of Environment and Tourism for its annual rhino dehorning operations that deter poachers. USFWS funds were used to pay for a combo grinder and generator petrol ($847) and helicopter hours ($11,334) and we paid for further chopper time ($2,446) from our own core funds.

$27,090 from the Wildcat Foundation paid for the next round of training for the North Luangwa Conservation Programme’s Rhino and Elephant Protection Unit. A regular cycle keeps rangers sharp and motivated.

$3,303 from our core funds paid for flights for two attendees at the Working Dogs workshop held in April 2018 in Johannesburg, which was highly praised by all participants. We also distributed rhino badges etc. worth £43 to attendees.

As usual, we made an annual grant of £1,000 from our core funds to the Rhino Resource Center, whose website, http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/ is an excellent reference base for researchers, students, NGOs and field programme personnel.

Finally, we sent $25,000 received from the Glen and Bobbie Ceiley Foundation, the fourth such annual grant, to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, for North West Namibia security workshops, trackers’ rations and vehicle running costs.