Thank you for making our grants possible!

Click on the sections below to see the grants we’ve sent so far this year.

Further down, you’ll see all of the grants we sent between April 2020 and March 2021.

More information on how we spend money can be found in our Audited Accounts on the Charity Commission’s website and Impact reports (latest copy viewable here).

If you’d like to understand more about our funding priorities, take a look at our grant-making policy. Further guidelines on applying for a grant can be found here.

Grants so far, 2021-2022

Indian Rhino Vision RV2020, India

  • We sent €2,000 from Rotterdam Zoo for IRV2020, where our focus in recent years has been on supporting intelligence and investigations work to combat rhino poaching and support prosecutions

Rhino Protection Unit programme, Indonesia

  • We sent £325 received in misc. restricted donations to help pay for patrols by the Rhino Protection Units in Way Kambas NP on the island of Sumatra. Way Kambas is believed to have a viable population of Sumatran rhinos in the wild, as well as being home to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary. The RPUs look for signs of rhinos (dung, wallows, browsing etc.) as well as detecting any illegal activity, such as snaring or logging. Each RPU comprises three members of staff from YABI, and Indonesian NGO, and one member of staff from the Forest Department, who is armed
  • We sent another £4,500 received from an anonymous donor, plus £365 in misc. donations via our website, for RPU operations in Way Kambas NP, Sumatra

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • $2,170 from INL funds: $1,700 from INL for Project UPTICK: monthly (March) salary for the Intelligence Assistant, and again for his April salary, and $470 for three months of cellphone contract x two personnel. 51 Degrees Ltd supports conservancies throughout Laikipia and other wildlife-rich areas of Kenya by gathering and analysing intelligence and warning conservancies of poaching threats. Another $2,487.50 paid for board and lodging and internal transfers between Nairobi and three sites in Laikipia by 51 Degrees’ Intelligence Trainer, who visits Kenya three times a year
  • $1,700 from INL for Project UPTICK covered the monthly (May) salary for the Intelligence Assistant
  • $2,170 from INL funds paid for the monthly (June) salary for the Intelligence Assistant and $470 covered three months’ worth of cellphone contracts for two personnel
  • Another $4,985 from INL paid for the intelligence trainer’s international flights, internal transfers and subsistence and travel while in Kenya
  • $3,400 from INL funds for Project UPTICK paid the monthly (July and August) salary for the Intelligence Assistant
  • $6,890 from INL funds for Project UPTICK: $1,700 from INL for the monthly (September) salary for the Intelligence Assistant; $4,500 for the Intelligence Trainer;s consultancy fees; and and $690 for 3 months of cellphone contract x 2 personnel
  • $1,819 from INL for Project UPTICK: the monthly (October) salary for the Intelligence Assistant
  • $5,000 from For Rangers to Local Ocean Trust in Kenya to pay for 3 x night-time beach monitors’ salaries
  • $1,819 from INL for Project UPTICK paid the monthly (November) salary for the Intelligence Assistant
  • US2,509 from INL for Project UPTICK paid the monthly (December) salary for the Intelligence Assistant; and for three months of cellphone contract for two personnel
  • $1,819 from INL for Project UPTICK for the monthly (January 2022) salary for the Intelligence Assistant; and another $1,819 from INL for the monthly (February) salary

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • $4,700 from INL funds via Project UPTICK: $3,800 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $900 for helicopter patrols to detect and deter any potential threats, whether from poachers or livestock rustlers, during March and April 2021
  • $5,360 from INL funds: $5,000 for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during March and April 2021, and $360 for Source Handler training course expenses
  • $1,900 from INL funds paid for fixed-wing aerial surveillance during May 2021, and another $2,500 paid for monthly intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd
  • A £2,000 donation from Robert Devereux, and another £2,195 from misc. restricted donations received was sent to help cover general Conservancy operating costs
  • $4,610 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for aerial surveillance during June 2021: $1,900 fixed-wing and $2,710 helicopter, while another $2,500 paid for intelligence gathering and analysis support during June 2021
  • $4,846.40 from INL for Project UPTCIK paid for aerial surveillance during July 2021: $1,900 fixed-wing and $2,946.40 helicopter; and $2,500 from INL funds paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during July 2021
  • $4,000 from INL funds paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during August, and a site visit by the intelligence trainer; while another $3,822.40 from INL funds paid for aerial surveillance during August 2021: $2,500 towards fixed-wing hours and $1,322.40 for helicopter flying time
  • $2,500 for intelligence gathering and analysis during September 2021, thanks to INL
  • $9,510.56 from INL funds for aerial surveillance during September 2021: $1,575 for the fixed-wing and $7,935.56 for the helicopter
  • $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during October 2021, again from INL funds
  • $6,296.60 from INL funds for aerial surveillance during October 2021: $4,226 for the fixed-wing and $2,070.60 for helicopter hours
  • $6,039 from INL funds paid for fixed-wing aerial surveillance during November 2021
  • $2,675 paid for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd, again thanks to the US government’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • US2,675 from INL funds paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during December 2021, and US3,579 for paid for fixed-wing aerial surveillance during December 2021
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during January 2022
  • $11,630.70 for aerial surveillance during January 2022: $4,148 for fixed-wing, and $7,482.70 for chopper time, thanks to funding from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • $5,901 from INL for fixed-wing aerial surveillance during February 2022
  • $4,280 from INL for intelligence work: US $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during February 2022 and $1,605 for Source Handler training

Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya

  • $13,456 from the US government’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs’ grant for Project UPTICK paid for IT support provided by 51 Degrees Ltd for the KWS Operations Room in Tsavo East National Park. The Ops Room is now equipped with hardware and software to support Earthranger™ that allows live situation analysis and facilitates the coordination of reactions
  • $6,728 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for IT support provided during June 2021by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRanger™
  • $6,728 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for IT support provided during July 2021 by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRanger™. Another $890 from INL funds paid for a new laptop for KWS staff at one of the eight regional headquarters being equipped with EarthRanger™ via Project UPTICK
  • $6,728 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for IT support provided during August 2021 by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRanger™. Another $5,237 paid for new laptops / desktops for KWS staff at HQ’s Command Centre, which is being equipped with EarthRanger™ via Project UPTICK
  • $9,400 from INL was used to equip the main KWS HQ with servers on which to run EarthRanger
  • $6,728 for IT support provided during September 2021 by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRanger, via the INL-funded Project UPTICK
  • $10,934.96 from INL for IT support and equipment for KWS to use EarthRanger
  • $3,834.96 from INL was used to pay for IT support provided during November 2021 by 51 Degrees Ltd regarding EarthRanger™
  • We awarded £1,846.96 from core funds to buy two Trovan microchip readers for the Kenya Wildlife Service. One will be allocated to the Veterinary Unit and the other to the Investigations Unit, to assist with the sampling of rhino horns and carcasses in order to get the DNA comparisons needed for improved investigations
  • $3,834.96 from INL for IT support provided during January 2022 by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRanger
  • $9,834.10 for IT support provided during February 2022 by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRanger, thanks to the INL-funded Project UPTICK

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $5,000 from INL funds via Project UPTICK paid for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during March and April 2021
  • $10,864 from INL paid for aerial surveillance during March and April 2021: $2,584 for fixed-wing; and $8,280 for helicopter patrols
  • $8,788 from INL funds: $1,900 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $6,888 for helicopter patrols; and another $2,500 for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during May 2021
  • €500 euros from Rotterdam Zoo was allocated towards Lewa’s canine unit, which is ably managed by Joseph Piroris
  • $13,742 from INL via Project UPTICJ paid for aerial surveillance and shared-asset training during June 2021: $2,174 fixed-wing and $11,568 helicopter. Another $4,000 for intelligence support covered $2,500 for intelligence gathering and analysis support during June 2021, and $1,500 for a site visit and training
  • $14,212 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for aerial surveillance during July 2021: $2,128 fixed-wing and $12,084 helicopter. Another $2,500 covered intelligence gathering and analysis
  • $4,000 from INL funds paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during August 2021, as well as a site visit by the Intelligence Trainer. $4,815.64 from INL funds paid for aerial surveillance during August 2021: $570.24 fixed-wing aerial surveillance; $1,322.40 helicopter aerial surveillance; and $2,923 chopper use during ranger training course Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • $2,500 for intelligence gathering and analysis during September 2021, via the INL-funded Project UPTICK
  • $11,209.20 from INL funds for aerial surveillance during September 2021: $316.80 fixed-wing and $10,892.40 helicopter (included chopper use during ranger training exercises)
  • $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during October 2021 (INL funds)
  • $14,006.66 from INL funds for aerial surveillance during October 2021: $3,016.06 fixed-wing and $10,990.60 helicopter (included chopper use during ranger training exercises)
  • $17,595.08 from INL funds for Project UPTICK paid for aerial surveillance during November 2021: $1,545.08 fixed-wing and $16,050 chopper
  • $2,675, also from INL, paid for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during November 2021
  • US13,437.42 from INL paid for aerial surveillance during December 2021: $2,009.82 for fixed-wing; and $11,427.60 for chopper hours. Another US2,675 paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during December 2021
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during January 2022
  • $5,576.84 for aerial surveillance during January 2022: $569.24 for fixed-wing; and $5,007.60 for chopper time, thanks to funding from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • $11,363.40 from INL for aerial surveillance during February 2022: $1,219.80 for fixed-wing; and $10,143.60 for chopper time
  • $4,536.80 from INL for intelligence work: US $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during February 2022; $1,605 for a site visit; and $256.80 for the costs of Source Handler training

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $505.73 from INL funds reimbursed Ol Jogi for the transport of uniform items (bought in the UK) from Nairobi to Borana
  • $6,040 from INL funds via Project UPTICK: $5,000 for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during March and April 2021; $1,500 for onsite visit and training by the Intelligence Trainer; and $540 incurred in course expenses for Source Handler training
  • $6,719.50 from INL funds: $1,900 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $4,819.50 for helicopter patrols during March 2021
  • Another $6,660 from INL funds: $1,900 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $4760 for helicopter patrols during April 2021
  • $6,660 from INL funds: $1,900 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $4,760 for helicopter patrols during May 2021
  • $509.74 from INL funds to reimburse Ol Jogi for the transport of rangers’ equipment items shipped from the UK from Nairobi to Borana for onwards distribution
  • $2,500 for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during May 2021, thanks to the grant from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • €500 euros from Rotterdam Zoo and €786.27 euros from Fondation Lutreola (Tallinn Zoo) was sent to help cover the costs of Ol Jogi’s canine unit
  • INL funds via Project UPTICK enabled grants of: $6,660 for aerial surveillance during June 2021 ($1,900 fixed-wing and $4,760 helicopter); and $2,900 for intelligence gathering and analysis during June 2021 ($2,500 for monthly support and $400 for training course expenses)
  • Another $284.55 remaining from a donation by Bradley and Kristen Garlinghouse was sent to help cover Conservancy operating costs
  • $6,731.40 from INL funds for Project UPTICK paid for aerial surveillance during July 2021: $1,900 fixed-wing and $4,831.40 helicopter. Another $2,500 covered intelligence gathering and analysis during July 2021
  • $9,202.20 from INL paid for aerial surveillance during August 2021: $1,900 fixed-wing and $7,302 helicopter flying time. Another $4,000 supported the costs of intelligence gathering and analysis during August 2021, and a site visit by the Intelligence Trainer
  • $2,500 for intelligence gathering and analysis during September, and another $2,675 for October, via Project UPTICK funded by INL
  • $6,697.80 aerial surveillance during September 2021: $1,900 fixed-wing and $7,302 helicopter; and $975.84 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance during November 2021, thanks to the INL grant
  • $975.84 from INL paid for aerial surveillance during November 2021 (all fixed-wing)
  • $2,675 from INL paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during November 2021
  • US30,000 from US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Fund (part of total $78,557.35 grant) was awarded to help maintaining the Conservancy’s radio infrastructure. Another US15,208.55 will be used for security equipment: five x fence energizers @ $385 / unit; five x solar-power / batteries for the fence energizers; and four x thermal-imaging units
  • US2,675 from INL for Project UPTICK was sent to pay for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during December 2021, and another US16,034.20 for aerial surveillance during December 2021: $2,033 for fixed-wing and $14,001.20 for chopper time
  • $2,033 from INL for fixed-wing aerial surveillance during January 2022
  • $4,280 for intelligence gathering and analysis during January 2022, together with a site visit to meet with Ol Jogi’s head of security and key personnel
  • $4,498 from INL for aerial surveillance during February 2022: $2,033 for fixed-wing; and $2,465 for chopper time
  • $2,675 from INL via for intelligence gathering & analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during Feb 2022 Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • $1,617.28 from core funds and $25,845.63 from USFWS to pay for helicopter hire for dehorning operations in two of Namibia’s national parks, to reduce the risk of poaching in areas of high rhino density
  • $839.99 from USFWS funds to pay the Off-Road Center in Windhoek for new shock absorbers for the vehicles used in annual dehorning operations
  • $239.64 from USFWS to pay for Covid-19 tests for the SMART consultant travelling from Lusaka to Windhoek
  • $16,000 from USFWS to pay Invictus K9 for refresher training (12 weeks) of canines and handlers. The introduction of K9 units in Namibia has had a significant impact on arrests of poachers from hot scent trails and for searching vehicles at roadblocks
  • $20,000 from USFWS to pay Invictus K9 for refresher training (12 weeks) of canines and handlers, topped up with $633.07 from core funds
  • $1,010.15 from the Woodtiger Fund as a fuel advance for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used by MEFT personnel involved in annual dehorning operations (locations kept confidential)
  • $754.24 for fuel for the K9 unit vehicle, and for accommodation for two vets during upcoming dehorning operations (locations kept confidential), thanks to the Valerie G Merrin 2006 Trust
  • $1,825.38 from the Valerie G Merrin 2006 Trust for four drums of AvGas for upcoming dehorning operations
  • $68,109.80 from USFWS to pay for 66.8 hours of helicopter time for dehorning operations (location confidential), to reduce the risk of rhinos being poached for their horns
  • $1,955.68 from USFWS funds to pay for a service to the chopper used in dehorning operations during March 2022; and another $393.90 from USFWS to pay for accommodation and food for the mechanics servicing the helicopter

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • $3,500 from an anonymous donor was sent to help cover the work of SRT’s Wildlife Crime Coordinator, who works closely with colleagues in other agencies to gather and analyse intelligence from informers
  • $5,000 (part of a $40,000 grant from the Glen and Bobbie Ceiley Foundation) went towards payments to informers, whose information leads to the arrest of those involved in rhino-poaching / horn-trafficking

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • £2,740 received from misc. restricted donations to help cover infrastructure maintenance and repairs in the Park. The managing agency, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, has imposed budget freezes for several years, and Covid-19 has reduced income from park entry fees and tourism lodges, so all of the provincial state parks are in need of basic equipment
  • A total of €6,000, thanks to grants of €1,500 from Zoo de la Boissière du Doré; €4,000 euros from Parc de Lunaret – Zoo de Montpellier; and €500 from Parco Natura Viva (ARCA Foundation) will be used to help cover essential repairs and maintenance
  • And another $5,666 from The Bernard F. and Alva B. Gimbel Foundation will also be used to help cover the purchase of uniform and rations etc., as well as routine repairs and maintenance
  • €15,000 from Kiezebrink will be used procure new thermal-imaging security cameras to monitor the fence perimeter and warn against any illegal incursions. This early detection system will enable rangers to respond quickly and proactively to illegal incursions, increasing their chances of successfully apprehending criminals before they have a chance to poach a rhino. In addition, Kiezebrink’s support will enable a solar energy system to be installed to power each camera, and fencing to be erected to safeguard the new equipment against theft and damage from wildlife in the area
  • $10,112 from the Woodtiger Fund paid for six sets of tires for HiP’s patrol vehicles (one each for the five Sections plus the Reaction Unit). Another $2,171 from the Woodtiger Fund was sent to help cover the costs of vehicle maintenance for HiP’s patrol vehicles during the 6-month period July-December 2021
  • €500 euros from Parco Natura Viva (ARCA Foundation) was sent to pay for more camera traps, used to detect wildlife but also human incursions
  • US$34,656.08 from the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Fund (part of a $82,538.20 total grant) was sent to buy 88 tyres for the Park’s law enforcement vehicles and cover maintenance costs for three vehicles in Manzibomvu Section and three in Makhamisa Section, where much of the driving is offroad, and another $10,719.98 will be used to pay for small items of equipment to be repaired / replaced as necessary
  • €4,000 from Parc de Lunaret – Zoo de Montpellier, together with €1,500 from Zoo de la Boissière du Doré; and £1,508.19 received in miscellaneous donations via our website, to pay for thermal-imaging binoculars and an Infrared pointer, to be used from a helicopter during emergency responses

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • A second and final instalment of €25,000 from WILDLANDS Nature and Education Fund was awarded to help cover the costs of constructing a hangar for the light aeroplane to be deployed in uMkhuze to assist with aerial surveillance, Personal Pilot Licence training for two members of staff, a drone kit, electric vehicle for patrolling the fence line, binoculars and tyres for law enforcement vehicles x 3
  • £1,250 from West Midland Safari Park, £787 received in misc. donations via our website, and £213 from core funds was sent to uMkhuze to be allocated to the upgrade of its aircraft hangar: gutters and a 10 000-litre rainwater tank; i-Weather station Airfield Weather monitoring; IP link for security camera and weather-station monitoring; and CCTV camera with live feed
  • US$44,231 from Ardea Cares, plus a previous $17,400 received from Ardea Cares, originally intended for ranger training but now reallocated, was awarded for a project entitled “Security equipment to support uMkhuze’s law-enforcement operations”. uMkhuze aims to build up its technological law-enforcement capability, to act as a force-multiplier for its hard-pressed rangers. Specifically, the grant will help pay for 2 x repeater back-up systems for the Victron 3kVa systems, a Kestrel Dual Stream Optical software for the Forward Looking InfraRed (FLIR) Remote Monitoring System, FLIR PT 606 HD Camera, and an interactive 65″ screen Ardea Cares
  • These grants were supplemented with US$500 from The Bernard F. and Alva B. Gimbel Foundation; US$12,000 from Save the Rhino International Inc.; and €5,000 euros from Fondation le Pal Nature, which completed the funding needed for the surveillance equipment wish-list
  • US$8,072.75 from the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Fund (part of a larger $67,006.14 total grant) was awarded to pay for five sets of new Landcruiser tyres

North Luangwa Conservation Project, Zambia

  • £31,984.68, including funds from the Estate of Betty Liebert, a legacy from Mat Thompson, from David Back’s memorial, misc. donations via our website, and those raised by the NLCP London Marathon team, were sent to pay for helicopter hours for aerial surveillance over North Luangwa National Park in the first quarter of 2022
  • $120,220.72 from Wildcat Foundation grant for law-enforcement equipment and anti-poaching operations, ranger salaries, bonuses and incentives, specialist and in-service training and vehicle running costs for North Luangwa National Park’s rangers, and towards a new aeroplane engine for aerial surveillance
  • Another $7,809.54 from Wildcat Foundation to pay fees for and expenses incurred by a trainer from Big 5 Protection, for Specialist tracking trainer course for REPU scouts in North Luangwa NP in November and December 2021
  • US$200,000 from the Wildcat Foundation grant was sent to help pay for law-enforcement equipment and anti-poaching operations, ranger salaries, bonuses and incentives, specialist and in-service training and vehicle running costs for North Luangwa National Park’s rangers
  • $25,210.70 from Wildcat funds to pay for law-enforcement equipment for the Dept of National Parks and Wildlife scouts in North Luangwa National Park
  • $59,754.57 from the Wildcat Foundation grant for law-enforcement equipment and anti-poaching operations, ranger salaries, bonuses and incentives, specialist and in-service training, and for vehicle-running costs for North Luangwa National Park’s rangers

Wildlife Crime Prevention, Zambia

  • A grant of $27,000 from Save the Rhino International Inc. was sent to pay for investigations into traffickers operating between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, which will enable government agencies to conduct successful law-enforcement operations in order to disrupt key trade routes, deter traffickers and reduce local demand

Follow the money investigation, Africa

  • ZAR 100,000 from Hleka Bafazi Holdings and ZAR 35,688.50 from MalaMala Game Reserve (PTY) Ltd helped to pay for the costs of a follow-the-money investigation into a major rhino-poaching syndicate
  • £28,706.57 was used to pay for work during the period April-September 2021 on a follow-the-money investigation into a major rhino-poaching syndicate, which is being funded by the UK Government through the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund
  • £73,255.41 was used to pay for work during the period October to December 2021 inclusive, on a follow-the-money investigation into a major rhino-poaching syndicate, which is being funded by the UK Government through the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund

Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area, Indonesia

  • We sent £310 received in misc. restricted donations to help cover the costs of Arenga palm eradication in Ujung Kulon NP, on the island of Java, Indonesia. Javan rhino numbers are now up to 75, following the birth in 2021 of four calves to date, and the death of three animals (natural mortalities). For Javan rhino numbers to continue to grow, and in the absence of an agreed plan to create a second, secure habitat in which to introduce a founder population, it is essential that the Ecological Carrying Capacity of Ujung Kulon NP is maximised. Arenga palm is an invasive species, which is not eaten by Javan rhinos, and there has been a real problem with Arenga palm forcing out native plants that are in Javan rhinos’ diets
  • Another £225.00 received in misc. donations via our website also went to Arenga palm eradication in Ujung Kulon NP, Java

Rhino Protection Unit programme, Indonesia

  • A grant of $10,500 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation was awarded for the reafforestation programme adjacent to Way Kambas National Park in Sumatra. Our implementing partner, the International Rhino Foundation, and Park authorities are working in partnership with local communities on this innovative conservation programme that will benefit Sumatran wildlife, and the people that share their habitat for years to come. Together, by reforesting two large plots of degraded land within Way Kambas National Park, we are creating new habitat for Sumatran rhinos and generating income in surrounding villages. Local farmers’ groups are employed to grow seedlings and people with disabilities are given income opportunities to plant seedlings, trim invasive species and maintain the new growth areas by hand. Local schools and scout troops are rolling up their sleeves as well. On visits to the sites, the children learn about the plants that rhinos like to eat and plant seedlings in the nursery to grow and be replanted, recovering more of the rainforest
  • Another $12,000 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation to pay for satellite phones and radio telecommunications for the operational needs of the patrol teams in Gunung Leuser NP in northern Sumatra

Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, Indonesia

  • We sent several grants towards the ongoing operating costs of the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, based in Way Kambas NP in Sumatra, where the conservation breeding efforts are underway with a handful of Sumatran rhinos. The SRS has seen the births of Andatu in 2012 and Delilah in 2016, the only births to date of Sumatran rhinos in captivity apart from the three at Cincinnati Zoo in the first decade of the 21st Our thanks to the Simon Gibson Charitable Trust, which awarded £5,000; to Speake Marin that donated £4,628.20 from the sale of a particular watch design; and to other donors who gave £629.85 in misc. restricted donations for the ongoing running costs of the SRS
  • £1,250 from West Midland Safari Park and another £362.77 in misc. donations via our website were sent to help cover the SRS’s running costs

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • $5,014 from the Bently Foundation’s grant and $696 from core funds was awarded to Conservation Alpha to help the Kenya Wildlife Service clean up historical rhino-sighting data from rhino sites (national parks and private and community conservancies) across Kenya. It is now possible to generate a full historic analysis of Kenya’s entire black rhino population performance, initially on a site-by-site basis, and eventually at national meta-population level. For example, site managers will be able to finally answer biological questions like “Do we lose more calves to predation than we expect”, and “Do we have density dependence in all or only some sanctuaries”, in other words, “What biological management actions do we need to take?”

Big Life Foundation, Kenya

  • $2,000 from the WildAid grant of $50,000, a continuation of the APLRS Core Critical Operating Costs appeal, was allocated to rhino monitors’ salaries. There is a small remnant population of Eastern black rhinos in the Chyulu Hills National Park and adjacent Mbirikani Group Ranch, which is monitored and protected by Big Life Foundation

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • We sent £878.35 from APLRS Emergency Fund to pay for the immobilization (helicopter, vet and drugs) of an injured male black rhino to evaluate the extent of his injuries following fights with a dominant male. Unfortunately, the injured bull had to be euthanized as his foreleg was found to have a complete fracture
  • $30,000 received from the Holtzman Wildlife Foundation, the second instalment of a 2-year grant totalling $60,000) was sent for the water reticulation project, which aims to expand the area used by Borana’s growing black rhino population. The provision of additional water sources has already resulted in rhinos moving into areas that were previously under-utilized
  • $5,000 from the Taliaferro Family Fund was sent to help cover general rhino monitoring costs on Borana
  • $10,000 from Tom and Molly Bedell was also sent to help pay for rhino monitoring and Conservancy running costs. One of Borana’s black rhinos, Kai Suen, has been named in honour of their son, Ren Suen Bedasbad
  • $3,275 from the WildAid grant totalling $50,000, for the continued APLRS CCOC Appeal, was allocated to Borana to help cover the cost of rhino monitors’ salaries
  • $10,000 from Lou DeLisser was sent to help cover general Conservancy operating costs
  • $39,960 from USFWS’s Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Fund (part of a $60,460 total grant) was sent to help cover the cost of Borana’s rhino monitors’ salaries. Another $5,500 from USFWS paid for the purchase of 10 x SMART camera traps to monitor wildlife movement and/or detect any human incursions; and $15,000 will be used to pay for repairs to one of Borana’s dams: Sieku dam. Maintaining water provision across the Conservancy is crucial in allowing rhinos and other wildlife to disperse across the entire landscape and ease density-dependence issues

Il Ngwesi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $2,000 from the WildAid grant totalling $50,000, for the continued APLRS CCOC Appeal, was allocated to Il Ngwesi to help cover the cost of rhino monitors’ salaries

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $13,546 from the WildAid grant of $50,000 for the continued APLRS CCOC Appeal was allocated to Lewa to help cover the cost of rhino monitors’ salaries
  • $16,022 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust was awarded to buy camera traps, rechargeable batteries, SD cards and binoculars, to support Lewa’s rhino monitoring effort
  • $39,320 from USFWS’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund (from a total grant of $71,702.21) was allocated towards the cost of Lewa’s rhino monitors’ salaries ($33,960). $3,360 will pay for 12 pairs of binoculars (11 monitoring blocks and the supervisor). $2,000 will pay for annual in-house refresher training for rhino monitors and update of Master ID files across the Lewa-Borana Landscape: 5 days @ $400 / day for food and associated costs. And $3,547.25 will pay for the repair of Dam ya mama repair, including the cost of the bulldozer, diesel, delivery of the bulldozer to the site and back, and subsistence for the driver

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $48,000 from Year 2 of a USFWS grant will buy a new vehicle, plus necessary bush modifications, for Ol Jogi’s rhino monitoring teams; while another $32,973 was awarded for water reticulation to improve the water supply for the Conservancy’s wildlife and rangers: Island Dam at HQ; Msitu ya Simba at Simba Trough; and T12 at HQ
  • $280 from APLRS Emergency Fund was used to reimburse Ol Jogi for 50% of the cost involved in treated a black rhino cow that had a suspected dislocated hip. She was immobilized, radio-graphed and treated with antibiotics and pain medication, and subsequently made a full recovery
  • $8,336 from the WildAid grant of $50,000 for the APLRS CCOC Appeal was sent to help cover rhino monitors’ salaries
  • A series of payments were made from a grant of $29,981 by the National Geographic Society for a research project: a study regarding the incidence of developed cataracts and significant visual impairment in Eastern black rhinos in Kenya. The field research will establish normal anatomy of the black rhino eye, and detect and classify ocular pathology in a wild population. By establishing whether cataracts are heritable and detecting associated genetic variants, the findings will help to inform management strategies for rhino in Kenya. $4,083.03 paid for 1 x TonoVet Probe and 2 x Tonometer Plus; and $3,711.16 reimbursed Dr Eleanor Milne for expenses related to the project: flights, fit-to-fly PCR tests and eVisas x 2, travel insurance x 1, and various equipment items (inc. ophthalmoscope, ultrasound gel, blood tubes, external hard drives, batteries, marker pens, and iPhone 6 refurbishment for panoptic photos
  • €5,000 euros from Erlebnis Zoo Hannover was sent to Ol Jogi to help cover the expansion of the Conservancy’s LoRaWAN project
  • $1,895.24 from USFWS (part of a total $78,557.35 grant) will be used to buy a new motorbike for the rhino monitoring unit. Motorbikes are much cheaper to run and maintain, and are an effective way for getting rangers to the right spot quickly

Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya

  • $13,843 from the WildAid grant of $50,000 for the APLRS CCOC Appeal was sent to help cover rhino monitors’ salaries

Sera Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $2,000 from the WildAid grant totalling $50,000, for the continued APLRS CCOC Appeal, was allocated to Sera to help cover the cost of rhino monitors’ salaries

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • $10,298.84 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust paid for a solar pump and accessories to provide 40,000 litres / day, from a depth of 83m, for a waterhole in Khaudum NP; and another $2,838.19 from the Trust paid for additional hire fees for the 6×6 and flatbed trucks used during rhino translocations carried out to relieve pressure on Ecological Carrying Capacity
  • $743.83 was advanced from the Woodtiger Fund’s 2-year grant to Chief Conservation Scientist and National Rhino Coordinator Piet Beytell for fuel for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used in rhino translocations taking place in mid-June
  • $1,873.50 from the Woodtiger Fund paid for six new tyres for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle, while another $114.74 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust paid for repairs to the RRV’s air-to-ground radio
  • $1,056.43 from the Woodtiger Fund was sent to Piet Beytell for fuel for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used in rhino translocations. Piet was driving during operations in August and September . Another $5,358.83 from Woodtiger Fund paid for six new tyres for one of the 6×6 rhino-capture trucks
  • $1,208.46 from USFWS funds paid for batteries for SMART devices being used in Waterberg Plateau Park
  • $999.39 from The Woodtiger Fund was sent as an advance to Chief Conservation Scientist, Piet Beytell, for fuel used during annual rhino operations
  • $1,202.60 from a USFWS grant was used to pay for hosting services for the Shiny app to support wildlife monitoring
  • Another $6,172.25 from USFWS paid for consultant services for predictive modelling of poaching hotspots
  • $961.51 from The Woodtiger Fund was sent as a fuel advance for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used in annual rhino operations; another $2,282.07 paid for maintenance for the Astra truck used during rhino ops; and $127.38 paid for maintenance for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle
  • $33,382 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust paid for: purchasing and positioning 20 x remote camera traps in Nyae Nyae Conservancy (home to black and white rhinos); providing rhino-sighting equipment and incentives; introducing SMART to Nyae Nyae Conservancy; and providing oversight (by staff from Save the Rhino Trust) for Nyae Nyae’s rhino monitoring effort
  • $64.17 from the Woodtiger Fund to pay for branding decals for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle; another $62.71 to pay for repairs to the canopy on the back of the RRV; and a further $712.17 from Woodtiger to pay for general repairs to the RRV
  • $1,022.91 from Woodtiger res funds to act as a fuel advance to Piet Beytell for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used in annual rhino operations
  • And $1,697.51 from USFWS funds to pay for 6 SMART tracking devices

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • A series of grants helped pay for rations for Save the Rhino Trust’s own trackers and for the Rhino Rangers from community conservancies on which the Kunene Region’s population of desert-adapted black rhinos are found: $9,070 from core funds; £2,564.47 from misc. restricted donations received via our website and SRT’s own justgiving.com page; $10,000 from USFWS; and €2,000 from Zoo Krefeld
  • USFWS also awarded $41,200 (from a total USFWS grant of $90,700) to pay salaries of SRT’s trackers based at Mai Go Ha! and of the Principal Field Officer #2 (Martin); and $39,500 to help pay for vehicle running costs
  • £9,000 from long-standing supporter Ales Weiner was sent to Save the Rhino Trust: a third will be used to buy new vehicle tyres (the huge distances and rough terrain in the Kunene Region’s 25,000km2 take a heavy toll on SRT’s vehicles); one third on rations for SRT’s own trackers and for the Rhino Rangers from the communal conservancies with which SRT works closely; and the final third on camping equipment for SRT’s trackers, e.g. tents
  • €3,000 euros from Bioparc Conservation (Bioparc de Doué-la-Fontaine) was allocated to the new mounted patrol unit. SRT has invested in a team of mules, which are well suited to patrolling the rocky and arid terrain of the Kunene Region in search of the elusive black rhino population
  • A series of grants totalling £8,764.22 was allocated to help cover the cost of SRT’s mule patrol team during the calendar year 2022: £137.99 received in misc. donations via our website; another £5,626.23 (inc. £5,000 raised / donated by Berry White) for the operating costs of the mule patrol; and a £3,000 grant from the Marjorie Coote Animal Charities Fund
  • $35,000 (part of a $40,000 grant) from the Glen and Bobbie Ceiley Foundation was also allocated to the operating costs of the mounted patrol unit. $22,903 will help cover the salary of the Mounted unit Project Manager; and $12,097 will help cover his vehicle fuel and running costs
  • $500 from Christina Lui was sent to support the vehicle running costs for the mounted unit Project Leader
  • $95,192 from US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund was awarded for the following: $46,960 on trackers’ salaries – SRT’s trackers will work on this project 12 months per year. There are 28 trackers at the main base, Maigoha! and 9 more at other bases, i.e. 37 in total. USFWS funds will cover the salaries of eight of SRT’s trackers for one year; $8,232 on rations – SRT provides rations for its own staff patrols (10 per month) and Rhino Rangers’ patrols (14 per month) = 24 patrols / month. Each patrol receives dry goods totalling $215 and a goat @ $128 = $343 / patrol, so USFWS funds will cover one month of rations; and $40,000 on vehicle running costs – SRT has 13 vehicles that are used by staff to deploy into the field, for staff welfare trips for food shopping & hospital visit, and for general administration purposes in Swakopmund
  • $25,000 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust will be used for the operating costs of a new mounted (mule) patrol unit to enable SRT to increase its patrol coverage of remote, poaching-hotspot areas. The grant will help cover the cost of the salary of the Mounted Unit Project Manager, as well as the construction of waterhole and installation of a solar pump, and building materials for the construction of a remote field base at !Axab
  • £7,768.82 received in miscellaneous donations (including £7,158 from our Keep Rhinos Connected appeal) will be used to buy remote camera traps in Nyae Nyae Conservancy (home to black and white rhinos)
  • £1,425 donated from SRI’s core funds for rations for SRT’s trackers and the Rhino Rangers, as well as base camp repair and maintenance costs at Maigoha!
  • $10,000 from EJF Philanthropies (Kindy French) was allocated to: camping equipment for Nyae Nyae Conservancy’s rangers (five bedrolls and tents); a contribution to borehole drilling for the new mounted unit’s camp; a traditional authority exposure trip to see rhinos in the Kunene Region; Eroku security operations; and upgrades at Maigoha! camp
  • $500 from Christina Lui was allocated to upgrades to Maigoha! camp
  • £1,800 raised by Berry White via a cocktail part was sent to help pay for building / upgrading fly camps
  • A total of £5,700 (£2,350 from Camilla Warre, £500 from Anne Hearn, £1,000 from Duncan Macpherson, and £1,850 from Ness Buxton) was sent to pay for rations for SRT’s trackers and the Rhino Rangers, as well as base camp repair and maintenance costs at Maigoha!; supplemented by an additional £311 received in miscellaneous donations via our website

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • $516.02 from the Woodtiger Fund paid for 80 x Trovan microchips, to be inserted into rhinos and horns during annual ear-notching operations in HiP in October 2021. Another $275.81 paid for Naltrexone and Hyaluronidase powder to be used during the annual operations in HiP. $903.05 from Woodtiger Fund was used to pay for drugs and darts for the operations. And we sent $42,239 from the Woodtiger Fund for a new Massey Ferguson 2640 4WD, which will be used for habitat management in HiP, clearing the fence line, etc.
  • $8,468.44 from the Woodtiger Fund paid Heligistics for chopper hours used during annual ear-notching operations carried out in October 2021. Another $1,702.96 paid KZN Nature Conservation Services for 15.2 hours of the use of the spotter plane during annual ear-notching operations
  • $13,500 from SRI Inc.’s core funds was sent to pay for the salary and vehicle running costs of HiP’s rhino monitor during the calendar year 2022
  • $486.01 from Woodtiger funds was used to pay for 75 x Trovan transponders and postage, for the rhino ear-notching operations scheduled for April / May 2022

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • We sent €3,000 (€2,000 from rhino’s energy and €1,000 from Zoom Torino to be used for rhino monitoring in uMkhuze, either for the rhino monitor’s salary or for 2021 ear-notching operations, as decided by uMkhuze’s Conservation Manager
  • Another €2,670 from the Association Française des Parcs Zoologiques and €5,000 euros from Fondation le PAL Nature, was allocated to help cover the rhino monitor’s (Joshua Rogers) salary during calendar year 2022

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • £24,600 from Peter and Birgit Lawrence was sent to NLCP for emergency rhino operations; any funds not used will be allocated to helicopter hours for aerial surveillance of North Luangwa National Park and its surrounding Game Management Areas

Lowveld Rhino Trust, Zimbabwe

  • We sent €2,544.03 (€2,000 from a grant from Dublin Zoo, the rest from core funds) to the Lowveld Rhino Trust to pay for the costs of updating LRT’s rhino monitoring database during the period September 2020 to May 2021 inclusive. LRT is responsible for monitoring the large black and white rhino populations in Bubye Valley Conservancy

Environmental Investigation Agency, UK

  • We sent a series of grants to pay for a ‘Changing China’ project run by the EIA to strengthen legal and policy frameworks in China: $2,770.25 from Ardea Cares; £3,000 from the Marjorie Coote Animal Charities Fund; £5,000 from the Samuel Storey Family Charitable Trust; and $10,500 from The Scott & Jessica McClintock Foundation. This is year two of the project, which will advocate for the adoption of a new State Council order and/or amendments to China’s wildlife laws; to encourage and amplify diverse voices calling for an end to the trade in threatened wildlife; and to undertake research and produce analysis to support policy recommendations

African Rhino Specialist Group, Africa

  • $12,590 from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Ltd funds towards the production of issue # 62 of Pachyderm, the journal of the African Elephant, the African Rhino, and the Asian Rhino Specialist Groups of the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC). Issue # 62 can be read online at https://pachydermjournal.org/index.php/pachyderm/issue/view/21
  • £1,000 from core funds towards the production of issue # 63; plus $10,900 from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Ltd funds towards the production of issue # 63 of Pachyderm, the Journal of the African Elephant, African Rhino and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups

Canine unit project, Africa

  • $134.88 from INL funds for enhanced DropBox storage for the K9 group. When the canine unit workshop planned for May 2020 in Lusaka had to be cancelled, we introduced webinars / training sessions every 6-8 weeks to maintain learning and the sharing of skills and experience between dog handlers across sub-Saharan Africa. Resources are shared via DropBox

Virunga Foundation, Democratic Republic of Congo

  • $10,080 from For Rangers funds was awarded to pay for rations for 6 months x 30 rangers @ $56pppm for rangers working in Mt Tshiaberimu to protect its critically endangered population of Eastern lowland gorilla

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • $3,460.79 from INL funds for Project UPTICK paid for shipping costs of 564 x Camelbaks and 24 x medical kit items from the UK to Kenya, £136.06 from INL funds paid for the delivery to Save the Rhino’s London office of trauma bandages for the patrol medic kits; all items were being consolidated there before being shipped to Kenya. Finally, $1,167.66 (from INL funds to paid for the shipping of a total of 738 items of patrol medic kit from the UK to Kenya, destined for the trained Patrol Medics employed by Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies
  • Another $1,350 from INL paid for 3 x training instructor days to write up training course reports / assessments of rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies
  • $29,752.48 from INL paid the 25% balance on the uniform order placed just before Christmas. All items were delivered to Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies in April for distribution (at six-monthly intervals) to their National Police Reservists and general security rangers
  • $1,350 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for 3 x training instructor days to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi and Borana
  • $450 from INL for Project UPTICK for 1 x training instructor day to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa
  • $6,211.15 from INL to pay for the cost of shipping military-style leather boots from the UK to Kenya, for onwards distribution to security-focused rangers working in Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies
  • £42,710.30 from funds raised by the For Rangers initiative for renewal of the life insurance policy for 1,300 rangers working at conservancies in Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Zambia, 22 June 2021 to 21 June 2022. The goal is to expand the reach in future years to cover 2,000 rangers across sub-Saharan Africa
  • $900 from INL funds for Project UPTICK paid for 2 x training instructor days to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies
  • $450 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for 1 x training instructor day to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa
  • $5,000 from For Rangers funds was awarded to pay for upgraded facilities at the James Ashe Antivenom Trust’s snake farm, so that they can deliver training onsite and host two students at a time
  • Another $5,000 from For Rangers funds went to the Mount Kenya Trust to pay for 4 x Garmin GPSs, 1 x satellite phone & airtime, 2 x uniforms, ranger counselling, firefighting training facilitation, financial literacy training & planning for rangers, and 2 x 4-day lifesaver courses
  • $11,100 from the INL grant for Project UPTICK paid for the production of 302 protective sleeves for Camelbak water bladders for rangers at Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies
  • $900 from INL for Project UPTICK for 2 x training instructor days to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies
  • $137,000 from For Rangers was sent to pay for a 2-year ranger training programme across Lolldaiga, Ole Naishu, Mugie, Sosian and Suyian conservancies. It is hoped that, eventually, some of these will become rhino guardians, to expand the rhino range across the Laikipia landscape
  • Another $5,690.49 from For Rangers for Christmas rations for conservancies in Laikipia, Kenya: tea leaves, sugar, long-grain rice, maize meal flour, baking flour, cooking fat x 1,095 units & soap x 2,190 units
  • $1,444.50 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for three days by 51 Degrees Ltd’s training instructor days to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa
  • $1,926 from INL for Project UPTICK for 4 x training instructor days to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa
  • $7,004.45 from ForRangers’ funds was awarded to Rhino Ark in Kenya for personal gear and camping equipment for deep-forest-enforcement operations: 15 x gum boots, raincoats, gloves, jungle boots, head gear, backpacks and sleeping bags; 6 x 3-man tents; 3 x 1-man tents; 6 portable stoves and gas cartridges; 3 First Aid kits; and 7 rechargeable torches
  • $17,005.62 from ForRangers’s funds was granted to El Karama Wildlife Conservancy to pay for a security base at the Northern entrance. The base will consist of a control room, two double bedrooms, a kitchen, and a toilet / shower room, all with a veranda. A rainwater tank and solar-power system will be included, as well as the existing radio base set. These buildings will be constructed by local builders using locally available materials, and be designed with a low profile to blend with the surrounding landscape. A perimeter fence will enhance security and protect trees

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • $34,233.92 from INL funds via Project UPTICK paid for ranger training as follows: $10,913.28 for Basic training; $3,183.04 for Patrol Medic training; and $20,137.60 for Rhino Tactical Refresher training
  • Another $8,184.96 from INL funds paid for an Advanced training course for some of Borana’s security-focused rangers in May 2021
  • $3,377.92 from INL paid for ranger training during June 2021: $2,598.40 for the Commanders’ training course (4 pax); and $779.52 for the Senior Commanders’ course (2 pax)
  • $17,539.20 from INL funds paid for Borana’s rangers to undergo a rhino training course
  • $15,000 from For Rangers funds was awarded to pay for accommodation upgrade at Bravo Golf. Currently three female rangers are posted at Bravo Golf, which has four dome-shaped rooms at the base. Three of these are used for accommodation. The remaining room is the radio room where equipment is also stored; it is also used as a common area and is where they watch TV in the evenings. There is one bathroom and one toilet outside, these are both in good condition and need no modification or upgrade. Borana would like to build five new rooms at this base: three of these rooms would be for accommodation; one for a common room; and the remaining room a kitchen
  • $25,506 from For Rangers was awarded to pay for the following: $13,618 to help cover the cost of a new 8-room accommodation block for rangers based at Borana’s HQ (the rest is being covered by the Anna Merz Rhino Trust); and $11,888 to pay for a fence around the football pitch to keep animals out, a new murramed basketball court, a roof over the High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) gym, and some HIIT training by a local firm based in Nanyuki, to improve the rangers’ fitness and strength and help improve morale within the team
  • The ForRangers’ grant was supplemented by $15,000 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust to pay for the construction of the additional 8-person accommodation block with bathrooms, adjacent to the National Police Reservists’ (NPR) base, for rangers and NPR, who are currently having to share accommodation
  • $8,444.80 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for ranger training during Dec 2021: $1,948.80 for Commanders’ training; and $6,496 for the Rhino tactical refresher training
  • $3,637.76 from INL funds for patrol medic training

Il Ngwesi Conservancy, Kenya

  • For Rangers awarded $6,600 to pay for materials (corrugated iron, timber, stone and labour costs) to upgrade 10 rangers’ houses, 1 ablutions block and install solar power, prior to the inbound translocation of more rhinos to the Conservancy. The improved facilities will greatly improve ranger morale

Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya

  • $11,600 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for 2 x training courses (User basic and Management basic) for KWS staff on the use of EarthRanger. And $1,032 covered the cost of subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ staff while training KWS staff at regional headquarters
  • $11,600 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for 2 x training courses (User basic and Management basic) for KWS staff on the use of EarthRangerTM. Another $864 covered subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ staff while training KWS staff at regional headquarters. And a further $7,056 from INL paid for 2 x training courses (User basic and Management basic) for KWS staff on the use of EarthRangerTM in another regional HQ
  • $13,920 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for two refresher training courses (User basic and Management basic) for KWS staff at HQ on the use of EarthRangerTM; for training on EarthRangerTM at a regional centre; and for IT support for installations across Kenya. Another $384 covered subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ staff while training KWS staff at regional headquarters
  • $4,980 in February 2022 from INL for Project UPTICK: $4,698 for 2 x refresher training courses (User basic and Management basic) for KWS staff; and US $282 for subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ staff while training KWS staff Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • $3,266.90 from INL for Project UPTICK: $2,349 for a User basic refresher training course for KWS staff; and $917.90 for subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ staff while training KWS staff during March 2022

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $3,767.68 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for ranger training during June 2021: $2,598.40 for the Commanders’ training course (4 pax); and $1,169.28 for the Senior Commanders’ course (3 pax)
  • $3,792 from INL paid for helicopter hours during ranger training exercises held during July 2021. Another $17,400 from INL funds covered the cost of Lewa’s rangers undergoing a rhino training course to keep field skills sharp
  • $15,990 from For Rangers funds paid for 36 x tracksuits, sleeping bags and ponchos for the Anti-Poaching Unit, and for 1 x solar power installation and 82 pairs of trainers and tracksuits for Lewa’s rhino monitors
  • $25,320 from For Rangers was awarded to Lewa: $12,990 for equipment for the Anti-Poaching Unit (tracksuits, trainers, sleeping bags, bedrolls and mosquito nets, as well as 15 solar panels to charge radios); and $12,330 for equipment for general security rangers (tracksuits, trainers, sleeping bags, bedrolls and mosquito nets, a solar-power installation at an outpost, and 30 x lockable storage boxes)
  • $15,200 from USFWS’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund (from a total grant of $71,702.21) will pay for the installation of solar-power in four ranger outposts @ $3,800 / outpost. $13,634.96 from USFWS will be put towards uniforms. Each of the 82 rangers (general security & rhino monitors) will receive two green shirts, two pairs of green trousers, one green jumper, one green heavy padded jacket and five pairs of socks
  • $9,094.40 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for ranger training: $6,496 for the Rhino tactical refresher course; and $2,598.40 for Commanders’ training
  • $3,637.76 from INL funds for patrol medic training
  • Another $20,484.09 from Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs paid for ranger training: $20,157.09 for Lewa’s rangers to undergo a rhino tactical refresher training course; and $327 for food for the patrol medics’ training course

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $20,137.60 from INL funds via Project UPTICK paid for Rhino Tactical Refresher training for Ol Jogi’s security-focused rangers
  • $5,456.64 from INL funds paid for some of Ol Jogi’s security-focused rangers to undergo an Advanced training course in May 2021
  • $3,767.68 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for ranger training during June 2021: $2,598.40 for the Commanders’ training course (4 pax); and $1,169.28 for the Senior Commanders’ course (3 pax)
  • $10,500 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation was sent to Ol Jogi to be used to upgrade ranger housing, i.e. to repair where possible or to build new accommodation and ablution blocks for Ol Jogi’s ranger force. Providing comfortable living conditions while on duty is key to maintaining ranger morale
  • $19,488 from INL funds paid for a ‘Rhino tactical refresher’ training course for Ol Jogi’s rangers
  • $497.31 from INL reimbursed Ol Jogi for the cost of transporting UK-sourced and -shipped rangers’ boots from Nairobi to Ol Jogi for onwards distribution to Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies
  • $15,000 from For Rangers’ funds was sent to pay for: $2,000 for Altberg Boots for 11 rangers who did not recently receive the same; $5,000 for rations for the 103 rangers for four months ending 31 December 2021; $3,000 for law-enforcement body-cameras; and $5,000 for upgrades to ranger accommodation and facilities
  • $14,953.56 from USFWS (part of a total $78,557.35 grant) was sent to pay for rations for 12 months: 103 pax receive monthly rations of rice, sugar, red wairimu beans, tea leaves, cooking oil & wheat flour, and 64 security-focused rangers also receive monthly rations while deployed of army biscuits, corned beef, tinned pineapple and tinned githeri. $16,500 from USFWS will be used to pay for three rangers’ accommodation units to be rebuilt during 2022 @ $5,500 / unit
  • $5,846.40 from INL paid for more ranger training during December 2021: $1,948.80 for Commanders’ training; and $3,897.60 for the Rhino tactical refresher training
  • $3,637.76 from INL funds paid for patrol medic training

Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya

  • $15,000 from For Rangers’ funds was awarded to pay for: 60 waterproof jackets and trousers, 60 warm jackets and 60 pairs of thermals (trousers and long-sleeved tops); 10 GPS units; 45 rechargeable LED torches; and shipping

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • $10,000 from For Rangers’ funds was awarded to help pay for the 2021 Ranger Awards Ceremony. 41 Rhino Rangers in the Kunene and Erongo regions of north-western Namibia were honoured at the 2nd Annual Kunene Rhino Awards on 18 November 2021 for their tireless work to protect the Namibia’s free ranging black rhino. The Rhino Rangers are community members within communal conservancies that track and monitor black rhinos through the harsh desert landscape daily, and have continued to do so throughout the pandemic year, ensuring the survival of this population. The winners were: Best rhino ID photo taken during patrol: Jackson Amakutuwa and Jessica Kharuxas; Most foot kilometres walked during the year: Michael Adams (2,167 km); Most active field ranger days: Chips Tjambiru (212 days); and Most rhino sightings during the year: Marthinus Sanib (432 sightings). In addition, Rhino Rangers who have been with the programme for longer than five years received Hero Jackets

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • We sent £10,430 to HiP:£430 received in misc. restricted donations that will be spent on ration packs and uniform items; and £10,000 from the Ernest Kleinwort Charitable Trust, which will be split equally between ration packs (c. 700) and uniform items for HiP’s ranger force
  • $5,428 from the Woodtiger Fund will be used to pay for small repairs and maintenance equipment for the Park, e.g. the servicing of lawn mowers and hedge trimmers, used to maintain tourism and patrol roads, and to clear a line along the fence-line; to repairs to generators at outposts that ensure water is pumped and electricity available; to the servicing and maintenance / repairs and/or replacement of boreholes at field ranger camps; and purchasing sundry items such as new taps / joins for handymen working at pickets / Section bases
  • €5,000 from Zoo Zlin was sent to buy kit for rangers’s extended patrols, that are scheduled during periods around the full moon when poachers tend to be most active
  • €500 euros from Parco Natura Viva will be used to pay for more camera traps
  • A grant of $26,593 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust will be used to pay for three types of ranger training course: four 8-day Combat Man Tracker Training, “Track a Person”, for eight rangers / course; one 12-day Tactical Operations Course, for 10 rangers; and three 4-day First Aid courses, “Provide risk-based primary emergency care / first aid in the workplace”, for 10 rangers / course
  • $4,473 from USFWS (part of a $82,538.20 total grant) was awarded to buy 420 ration packs for HiP’s rangers while on extended patrols. $8,839.50 will buy 150 TacSpec 55-liter daypacks for the Park’s rangers. $23,849.64 from USFWS will be used to pay for accommodation repairs and refurbishment :Manzibomvu Section: water provision; Nqumeni Section: solar-panel system; Masinda Section: cupboards, solar-power system, ablutions block maintenance, water tanks and gas freezer); Makhamisa Section: solar power and plumbing repairs; Mbuzane Section: rethatching eight rondavels; and Reaction Unit Section: Conservation Manager – Law-Enforcement Monitoring accommodation repairs

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • €7,500 euros received from Stichting Wildlife (related to Safaripark Beekse Bergen, Hilvarenbeek, in the Netherlands), a long-standing supporter of rhino conservation efforts in uMkhuze, was awarded to help cover the costs of backpacks, belts and other equipment / uniform items
  • $58,933.39 from USFWS (part of the $67,006.14 total grant) was sent to pay for refurbishment of ranger accommodation: maintenance and refurbishment of three x picket camps’ kitchens and ablutions blocks (Sinkweni, Gwambane and Dakela); complete refurbishment of Shobeni Outpost; refurbishment of Section Ranger South’s office; and the refurbishment of Section Ranger South’s bathroom and kitchen

Rhino horn antiques trade, UK

  • We awarded £1,600 from core funds to pay for the design and layout of “Sounding the Horn, an update: Three years of rhino horn antiques sold at auction in the UK, 2017 to 2019“, written by Sue Brace and edited by SRI’s CEO, Cathy Dean. The updated survey continues to highlight the loopholes in regulations concerning the sale of rhino horn antiques that allow, we believe, horn from poached rhinos to be laundered via the UK’s antiques trade

Rhino Resource Center, UK

  • As in previous years, we awarded £1,000 from our core funds to the Rhino Resource Center, which is an invaluable online reference source for rhino conservationists, field practitioners and students alike. http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • We awarded a total of £924 from core funds to pay for 33 places in the 2021 Virtual London Marathon, as a team-building event to raise morale among North Luangwa’s scout force
  • $10,000 was awarded from For Rangers’ funds to NLCP in Zambia. The North Luangwa Ecosystem’s anti-poaching units are composed of Government-employed DNPW Wildlife Police Officers (WPO), and Community Scouts (CS) who are paid through tourism revenue derived by Community Resource Boards via safari hunting. The current Covid-19 pandemic and the associated suspension of all international tourism poses an ongoing and immense challenge to already marginalised communities. An injection of support specifically for WPO and CS welfare falls in-line with current efforts to overhaul NLCP’s health and wellbeing strategy to improve the physical, mental and emotional fitness of its staff and partners. Addressing WPO / CS female menstrual hygiene will also reduce absenteeism and improve their welfare whilst in the field. In order to sustain law enforcement activities, NLCP will utilise this funding to purchase fitness equipment, sports clothing, footwear, cross-fit accreditation courses; and ‘ufulu’ menstrual hygiene pads for female officers
  • $50,680 from our sister organization, Save the Rhino International Inc., was awarded for a project entitled “Breaking barriers to create female participation in natural resource management”. This project seeks to increase female representation in the wildlife protection sector in North Luangwa by focusing on: Leadership training for 40 female community scouts ($20,000); Gender-bias and barrier soft-skill training for 400 wildlife protection officers ($20,000); 80 spousal visits to the field programme to increase local understanding of spouses’ work ($2,000); and Essential products to cater to 140 women’s needs in the field ($8,680)

African Rhino Specialist Group

  • We sent $5,626 from a USFWS grant and $5,000 from our own core funds to pay Dr Richard Emslie for his work as AfRSG Scientific Officer during the period July-December 2020
  • We sent USD $5,000 from core funds and $8,374 from USFWS to pay Dr Richard Emslie for his work as AfRSG Scientific Officer during the period January-June 2021
  • $16,000 from SRI Inc.’s core funds was awarded to pay for the daily fees of the part-time role of AfRSG Programme Officer (PO), Keitumetse (‘Kate’) Mosweu. The PO will support the Chair, Vice Chairs and Scientific Officer as needed, liaise between and facilitate the Group’s various working groups and task forces, and help organize the triennial meetings
  • $6,574.62 from USFWS funds was sent to pay professional facilitator Lizzie Crudgington for her work to support the planning and facilitation of the 2022 AfRSG virtual meeting, being held in March
  • $10,881.43 from USFWS funds, and $2,211.66 from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Ltd funds, to pay Lizzie Crudgington for her work to support the planning and facilitation of the 2022 AfRSG virtual meeting
  • $23,146 from USFWS (topped up with $854 from core funds, to replace the overspent previous grant), split: $14,000 for the Scientific Officer, and $10,000 for the Programme Officer, for work on core activities during the calendar year 2022; plus another $12,244.84 from core funds for the Scientific Officer’s consultancy fees during 2022
  • £3,756.22 received in miscellaneous donations via our website, including £750 from Patrick Pare on behalf of Zoo de Granby, to help cover the costs of the AfRSG Secretariat: consultancy fees for the Scientific Officer (SO) and Programme Officer (PO), as well as subsistence and travel costs for the Chair and SO, and misc. admin expenses / bank fees as needed

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • We sent a total of $16,210.40 from two grants from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation to help cover the salary of the APLRS Administrator salary. John Gitonga is based in the rhino programme office at the Kenya Wildlife Service’s HQ in Nairobi, and works alongside the KWS Rhino Scientist to support rhino sites across Kenya with implementing the activities detailed in the national Black Rhino Action Plan
  • $5,000 from the WildAid grant of $50,000 was allocated towards the legal costs of registering the APLRS properly; earlier paperwork is no longer in line with current legal requirements
  • $9,521.52 from USFWS’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund was sent to help cover the salary and allowances of the APLRS Administrator during calendar year 2022

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • We sent the first $5,000 of a 2-part grant totalling $10,000 from WildArk to Borana Conservancy in Laikipia County, Kenya, to help pay for a new environmental education bus. Borana has run the Borana Education Support Programme for many years now, which helps pay for student bursaries and teacher salaries; the ambition is to be able to bring community groups onto the Conservancy itself and introduce them to the wildlife conservation efforts and livestock-to-market programme first-hand. Borana has completed a survey to look at the social impact of protected areas in order to better understand how the Conservancy’s activities affect those of its neighbours
  • And we sent the $5,000 from WildArk, received via CAF America, for Borana’s new environmental education bus
  • The CHK Foundation awarded £10,000 towards the operating costs of Borana’s Mobile Health Clinic, for the period September 2021 to August 2022; to this we added £53 received in miscellaneous donations via our website
  • $43,000 (from the total grant of $48,250 from Save the Rhino International Inc.) was sent to help cover the Y1 (2022) costs of a new conservation education programme at Borana, “Connecting Conservancies and Communities Project (CCCP): Securing the future of black rhino conservation in Laikipia, Kenya”. This Project proposes an expansion of the existing Borana Education Support Programme to address the unsustainable utilization of natural resources in the Ewaso Nyiro ecosystem. The CCCP will engage with Borana’s neighbours to broaden, deepen and inspire their understanding of conservation and its importance for the health of all those, human, faunal and floral, in the landscape. Specifically, the funds will pay for the recruitment and salaries of two new conservation education officers, monoculars and game-viewing guides; and to help cover the purchase and conversion of a bus to bring groups into the Conservancy. This was magnificently supplemented by a grant of $65,300 from Ardea Cares to complete the funding for Y1 of the project: specifically: $33,000 towards the purchase & conversion of a bus, and then for Y1 fuel and maintenance; $32,000 for the construction of a classroom and kitting it out; and $300 for stationery supplies
  • $561.25 (from SRI Inc.’s total grant of $48,250) was sent to reimburse Richard Hennery for a return flight to Nairobi. Richard will be visiting Borana for a week in February to advise on the development of the new conservation education programme; plus another $127.54 to reimburse Richard Hennery for travel expenses (visa, medication, insurance) related to the February trip to Borana
  • $2,000 from Francis and Sandi Blake, in memory of Tony and Rose Dyer, was sent to Borana for the Mobile Health Clinic

Lowveld Rhino Trust, Zimbabwe

  • £19.98 from miscellaneous donations received via our website to pay for LRT’s domain name renewal for the period April 2022 – March 2023

Grants during 2020-2021

Indian Rhino Vision (IRV) 2020

  • €1,000 euros from Rotterdam Zoo for IRV2020; to be used for the wildlife crime investigation and enforcement programme that trains the judiciary and magistrates on laws concerning wildlife crimes, the significance of the illegal wildlife trade, and on the sentencing guidelines
  • 2,000 euros from Parc Animalier de Branféré for IRV2020; to be used for the wildlife crime investigation and enforcement programme

Rhino Protection Unit programme, Indonesia

  • $208 received in miscellaneous donations for the RPU programme in Way Kambas National Park, to help cover the rangers’ salaries and rations
  • €5,000 from Odense Zoo in Denmark for the RPU programme in Way Kambas NP

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • $10,730 from For Rangers’ restricted funds to pay for rangers’ wages ($6,330) and vehicle fuel and maintenance ($4,400) at Enonkishu Conservancy in the Masai Mara
  • $1,700 from the US Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) for Project UPTICK (Uniting Protection Training and Intelligence in Central Kenya) to cover the monthly salary of 51 Degrees’ Ltd’s Intelligence Assistant
  • Another $1,700 from INL for Project UPTICK: monthly (November) salary for the Intelligence Assistant
  • $2,170 from INL funds for Project UPTICK: monthly (December) salary for the Intelligence Assistant and $470 for 3 months of cellphone contracts x 2 personnel
  • $1,700 from INL for Project UPTICK: monthly (January) salary for the Intelligence Assistant
  • $1,700 from INL for Project UPTICK: monthly (Feb) salary for the Intelligence Assistant

Big Life Foundation, Kenya

  • $35,000 from the Bently Foundation in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, to help cover Core Critical Operations Costs: the salaries of security staff and associated staff costs, vehicle fuel and maintenance costs for patrol purposes, flying time (helicopter and fixed-wing, as a deterrent to incursions and reaction to any threats), and other essential costs, including: canine units; intelligence gathering and analysis; a proportion of management staff (reduced) salaries; electricity / power, water, fence and road maintenance for security purposes; communications (again security-related) and any emergency vet interventions required. All these security-related activities must continue, if the conservancies and the wildlife they nurture are to survive the immediate crisis
  • $45,000 from the Bently Foundation / For Rangers / WCN Rhino Recovery Fund for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $4,750 from a WildAid grant for the APLRS-CCOC appeal, to help cover anti-poaching costs during the period April 2020-March 2021

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • $55,000 from the Bently Foundation in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, to help cover Core Critical Operations Costs (as for Big Life Foundation)
  • $50,000 from Save the Rhino International Inc. for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $225,000 from For Rangers for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $82,500 from the Bently Foundation / For Rangers / WCN Rhino Recovery Fund for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $5,000 from Taliaferro Family Fund for general Conservancy operating costs
  • $10,000 from Ingemar Goksøyr and Myfrid Oygard for a rhino naming opportunity and to help pay for Conservancy running costs
  • £1,199 received in misc. restricted donations via our website, to help cover Borana’s ongoing operating costs
  • £20,000 from the Rothes Charitable Trust to help Borana’s general operating costs. Income from the lodge has completed disappeared due to the Covid-19-imposed restrictions on international flights
  • $1,900 from the US Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, via Project UPTICK, for fixed-wing and $2,400 for helicopter surveillance over Borana and neighbouring conservancies during October 2020, and another $2,500 for intelligence analysis and support by 51 Degrees Ltd
  • $25,000 from the Bently Foundation, as an incentive grant for having raised the most, equally with Ol Jogi Conservancy, for the collective APLRS Core Critical Operations Costs (CCOC) Appeal
  • $1,900 from INL funds via Project UPTCIK to pay for fixed-wing aerial surveillance in November; another $2,500 for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during November 2020
  • $8,678 from INL funds for Project UPTICK: $1,748 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $6,930 for helicopter patrols during December 2020; and another $2,500 for intelligence gathering & analysis the same month
  • $9,000 from a WildAid grant for the APLRS-CCOC appeal, to help cover anti-poaching costs during the period April 2020-March 2021
  • $44,000 from Ardea Cares, to pay for new Toyota Landcruiser for its Borana’s Anti-Poaching Unit
  • $4,240 from INL funds via Project UPTICK: $1,900 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $2,340 for helicopter patrols during January 2021
  • $2,500 from INL funds for intelligence gathering & analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during January 2021
  • $2,500 from INL funds for intelligence gathering & analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during February 2021
  • $3,088 from INL funds via Project UPTICK: $1,900 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $1,188 for helicopter patrols during February 2021

Il Ngwesi Community Conservancy, Kenya

  • $10,000 from the Bently Foundation in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, to help cover Core Critical Operations Costs (as for Big Life Foundation)
  • $13,000 from the Bently Foundation / For Rangers / WCN Rhino Recovery Fund for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $4,512 from the WildAid grant for the APLRS-CCOC appeal, to help cover anti-poaching costs during the period April 2020-March 2021

Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya

  • $9,425 from INL for Project UPTICK: $5,800 for 51 Degrees’ staff time for setting up the Ops Room in Tsavo East NP and $3,625 for Ops Room equipment for the Ops Room
  • $2,187 from INL funds via Project UPTICK to equip the Tsavo Regional HQ for EarthRanger®: laptops, wall mount and metal trunking

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $40,000 from the Bently Foundation in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, to help cover Core Critical Operations Costs (as for Big Life Foundation)
  • $82,500 from the Bently Foundation / For Rangers / WCN Rhino Recovery Fund for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $4,680 from the US Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) for helicopter surveillance over Lewa and neighbouring conservancies during October 2020; $20,520 part-payment for new digital radios and $5,112 for spare radio batteries, and another $2,500 for intelligence analysis and support by 51 Degrees Ltd, as part of Project UPTICK
  • $2,640 for helicopter and $228 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance over Lewa and neighbouring conservancies during November, and $2,500 for intelligence gathering and analysis, thanks to the grant from INL
  • $4,432 from INL funds: $1,102 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $3,330 for helicopter patrols during December 2020; and another $2,500 from INL funds for intelligence gathering and analysis the same month
  • $9,000 from a WildAid grant for the APLRS-CCOC appeal, to help cover anti-poaching costs during the period April 2020-March 2021
  • $4,846 from INL funds for Project UPTICK: $1,786 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $3,060 for helicopter patrols during January 2021
  • $2,500 from INL funds for intelligence gathering & analysis during January 2021
  • $2,708.80 from INL funds via Project UPTICK: $2,500 for intelligence gathering & analysis during February 2021, plus $208.80 for transport during Source Handler role-play exercises
  • $3,088 from INL funds via Project UPTICK: $1,900 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $1,188 for helicopter use during Patrol Medic training in February 2021

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $55,000 from the Bently Foundation in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, to help cover Core Critical Operations Costs (as for Big Life Foundation)
  • $50,000 from Save the Rhino International Inc. for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $125,000 from For Rangers for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $82,500 from the Bently Foundation / For Rangers / WCN Rhino Recovery Fund for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $1,900 from the US Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) for Project UPTICK, to pay for fixed-wing aerial surveillance over Ol Jogi and neighbouring conservancies during October 2020, and $2,953 for equipment for the Central Operations Room (fire extinguishers, CCTV, solar panels, batteries and charge controllers, and back-up generator), which is linked to the Joint Operations Command Centre (JOCC) at Lewa Wildlife Conservancy
  • $24,959 from the Bently Foundation as an incentive grant for having raised the most, equally with Borana Conservancy, for the collective APLRS CCOC Appeal, for funds for Core Critical Operations Costs, together with $41 from our own core funds to make up the difference lost due to bank transfer fees
  • $20,943 from INL funds for Project UPTICK: $9,212 to pay for equipment for the Central Operations Room (computer, additional screen, wall bracket, HDMI cable, firewall, server and cabinet); $2,250 to pay for training for the COR staff on the use of EarthRanger; and $9,481 for helicopter and fixed-wing aerial surveillance during October and November
  • Another $5,000 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during October and November
  • $2,500 from INL funds for intelligence gathering and analysis during December 2020, and another $4,600, also from INL: $1,900 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $2,700 for helicopter patrols during December 2020
  • $9,000 from the WildAid grant for the APLRS-CCOC appeal, to help cover anti-poaching costs during the period April 2020-March 2021
  • $6,688 from INL funds for Project UPTICK: $1,900 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $4,788 for helicopter patrols during January 2021
  • $2,500 from INL funds for intelligence gathering and analysis during January 2021
  • $2,500 from INL funds for intelligence gathering and analysis during February 2021
  • $6,692 from INL funds via Project UPTICK: $1,900 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $4,792 for helicopter patrols during February 2021
  • $596.59 from INL funds to pay for equipment for the Central Operations Room (switches for server and ancillary equipment)

Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya

  • $40,000 from the Bently Foundation in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, to help cover Core Critical Operations Costs (as for Big Life Foundation)
  • $82,500 from the Bently Foundation / For Rangers / WCN Rhino Recovery Fund for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $9,000 from the WildAid grant for the APLRS-CCOC appeal, to help cover anti-poaching costs during the period April 2020-March 2021

Sera Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $15,000 from the Bently Foundation in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, to help cover Core Critical Operations Costs (as for Big Life Foundation)
  • $12,000 from the Bently Foundation / For Rangers / WCN Rhino Recovery Fund for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $4,750 from the WildAid grant for the APLRS-CCOC appeal, to help cover anti-poaching costs during the period April 2020-March 2021

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • $2,680 from core funds and $6,154 from US Fish & Wildlife Service to procure additional dogs for Namibia’s canine unit, which has proved so successful in deployment in Etosha NP and elsewhere in the country
  • $589 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust for repairs to the reciprocal saw and new blades for rhino dehorning operations on custodian properties
  • $729 from core funds to pay for a new safe in which to store horns removed in dehorning exercise, and $310 from core funds to pay for a fridge in which to store genetic samples taken during immobilizations
  • $3,062, $1,427 and $1,403 from core funds to pay for veterinary drugs and consumables used during rhino immobilization operations, whether to ear-notch, dehorn, or translocate animals away from rhino-poaching hotspots; and another $1,427 from core funds to pay for veterinary / darting equipment
  • $1,489 from core funds to pay for new wheels for the trailers used to hold black rhino crates during translocations and $224 from core funds to pay for ties to fix the black rhino crates to their trailers
  • $1,903 from USFWS to pay for new dart gun and sights, $1,527 to pay for more veterinary / darting equipment, and $24,746 to pay for helicopter hours for annual dehorning operations
  • $310 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust to pay for paintballs, used to mark rhinos during immobilization operations so that they are not inadvertently re-darted. The paint is water-soluble and non-toxic, and rubs off after a week of dust or mud wallows
  • $2,879 from the Valerie G, Merrin 2006 Trust was used to pay for modifications to white rhino crate used for translocations (whether to remove rhinos from high-risk areas or for biological management): changes to the doors with new stoppers and hinge-locking system, production of off-road ramp, rubber surround, rear-locking bracket system with three sliding poles, and a hole at front for rope pull-through
  • $997 from USFWS funds paid for misc. consumables used during rhino immobilisation operations
  • $7,234 from USFWS paid for the hire of a 6×6 capture truck used for rhino translocations
  • $2,151 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust to pay for 6.5 hours service & additional repairs to the Rhino Recovery Vehicle that suffered from fire damage
  • $43,576 from USFWS funds to pay Namibia Helicopter Services for chopper hours in Khaudum NP and Waterberg Plateau Park for translocations and immobilisations
  • $2,172.94 from USFWS paid for for AvGas for dehorning operations
  • £1,459.59 from The Royal Foundation of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge paid for a service & spare parts for the fixed-wing aircraft stationed in Etosha NP; and another £2,435.63 paid for services to the three rhino vehicles stationed in the Park

Gashaka Gumti National Park, Nigeria

  • $10,000 from funds raised by the For Rangers initiative to Gashaka Gumti National Park in Nigeria, pay for Iridium satellite handsets, antennae etc. to improve communications in the Park
  • £5 from core funds for transfer fees

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • £5,168 received in misc. donations and from Rhino Covid-19 Crisis Appeal during June 2020, to be used as needed. Covid-19 has hit HiP hard, with no income from Park entry fees or tourism lodges, and yet many additional items of Personal Protective Equipment were needed that were not in original Park budgets
  • €2,500 from Parc de Lunaret – Zoo de Montpellier, a long-standing supporter of HiP, to be used to help buy misc. items of law-enforcement equipment
  • $16,136 from US Fish & Wildlife Service to pay for new vehicle tyres, and a further $3,185 from USFWS for aerial surveillance over HiP. The Savannah S light sport aircraft is used to help spot animals for the rhino trackers, to monitor the progress of any wildfires, to look for predators that may have strayed out of the Park, and to assist during live operations to apprehend poachers April 2020-March 2021 USFWS

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • €25,000 from WILDLANDS Nature and Education Fund (also known as Zoo Emmen) helped pay for aircraft hangar construction, pilot training for two pilots to obtain their light sports aircraft licences and accommodation while training, a drone kit, an electric vehicle to monitor the Reserve’s fence-line, binoculars for the field rangers and tyres for three law-enforcement vehicles. This is the first half of a total €50,000 donation by WILDLANDS Nature and Education Fund for uMkhuze

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • $700,000 from the Wildcat Foundation for law-enforcement equipment and anti-poaching operations, ranger salaries, bonuses and incentives, specialist and in-service training and vehicle running costs for North Luangwa National Park’s rangers
  • $3,573 from a multi-year grant from the Wildcat Foundation paid for anti-poaching operations and equipment by and for North Luangwa National Park’s rangers
  • Another $300,000 from the Wildcat Foundation’s 2-year grant for law-enforcement equipment and anti-poaching operations, ranger salaries, bonuses and incentives, specialist and in-service training and vehicle running costs for North Luangwa National Park’s rangers
  • $24,443 from the Wildcat Foundation to pay for law-enforcement equipment and its import into Zambia
  • $12,992.84 from the Wildcat Foundation to pay Takuhe Consultants Ltd for consultancy in and travel to North Luangwa National Park during January-February 2021
  • Another $164,959.78 from Wildcat Foundation’s grant for law-enforcement equipment and anti-poaching operations, ranger salaries, bonuses and incentives, specialist and in-service training and vehicle running costs for North Luangwa National Park’s rangers

Nsumbu Tanganyika Conservation Project, Zambia

  • $2,903 from the Wildcat Foundation went to NTCP in Zambia for anti-poaching operations. NTCP Zambia is another programme run in a partnership between the Frankfurt Zoological Society (FZS) and the Department of National Parks and Wildlife. NTCP hopes to receive rhinos at some point in the future, and is busy preparing the Park’s infrastructure and ranger force for an increased emphasis on endangered species
  • $12,007 from the Wildcat Foundation to pay for law-enforcement equipment and its import into Zambia, and another $14,207 from Wildcat to reimburse NTCP for local expenditure on law-enforcement equipment, ranger training, training-related travel and subsistence and Garmin GPSs, plus $35 from our own core funds to make up amounts lost during international transfers

Follow-the-money investigation

  • $20,591 from Save the Rhino International Inc. went to help cover the costs of a follow-the-money investigation into a major rhino poaching syndicate
  • £18,973 from core funds to help pay for the costs of a follow-the-money investigation into a major rhino poaching syndicate
  • And a further $39,270.26 from Save the Rhino International Inc. went to help cover the costs of a follow-the-money investigation into a major rhino-poaching syndicate

Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area, Indonesia

  • $50,000 from Save the Rhino International Inc. thanks to a major unrestricted donation from an anonymous donor, which will be used to help pay for the Rhino Protection Unit programme in Ujung Kulon NP, home to the world’s only population of Javan Rhinos. The RPUs are on patrol for c. 15 consecutive days, looking for signs of rhino and other large megafauna, as well as acting upon any illegal activities, such as logging or snares. Each RPU comprises one member of National Parks staff, who is armed; the other three are from YABI, or Yayasan Badak Indonesia (the Indonesian Rhino Foundation)
  • £172 received in misc. donations for Arenga palm eradication un Ujung Kulon NP. With only one site currently available for Javan rhinos, ensuring that more of the Park has suitable fodder plants for the rhinos is the simplest way of expanding suitable habitat. Arenga palm is an invasive species that dominates undergrowth unless checked
  • £166 received in misc. donations via our website for ongoing rhino monitoring by the Rhino Protection Units in Ujung Kulon NP
  • $10,500 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation to help cover the costs of the RPU programme in Ujung Kulon NP, Java
  • And £546 received in misc. donations for the RPU programme in Ujung Kulon NP

Rhino Protection Unit programme, Indonesia

  • £5,000 from the Simon Gibson Charitable Trust helped cover the operating costs of the RPUs working in Way Kambas NP in south-eastern Sumatra
  • £2,500 from David Williamson and Sue Ripley, together with another £2,086 and £405 received in misc. donations in response to our Rhino Covid-19 crisis appeal held during July 2020, to help pay for the cost of the RPU programme in Way Kambas NP
  • £1,060 from restricted misc. dons for the Way Kambas reforestation project ($1,000 covers the cost of replanting one acre of trees)
  • £4,500 received as an anonymous donation from a company helped cover the RPUs’ salaries and rations
  • £414 in misc. donations for the RPU programme in Way Kambas NP

Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, Indonesia

  • $25,000 (the fourth and last instalment of the $100,000 commitment from our core funds) for the Sumatran Rhino Rescue Project
  • $20,000 (the third instalment of a $100,000 commitment ) from Wilhelma Zoo Stuttgart for the Sumatran Rhino Rescue Project
  • £384 from misc. restricted donations for general Sanctuary running costs
  • Another £64 received in misc. donations via our website for general Sanctuary running costs
  • $20,000 (the fourth and final instalment of the $100,000 commitment) from Wilhelma Zoo Stuttgart for the Sumatran Rhino Rescue project
  • £2,474.84 from Speake Marin and £777.04 received in misc. donations for general Sanctuary running costs
  • €1,303 from Hodonin Zoo in the Czech Republic and €3,193.24 euros from Fondation Lutreola (Tallinn Zoo) for general running costs of the SRS

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • $5,297 paid from Bently Foundation funds and $1,703 from core funds paid for Conservation Alpha to support the Kenya Wildlife Service and the APLRS to clean-up historical rhino-sighting data from rhino sites throughout Kenya. A new reporting tool built by Conservation Alpha will facilitate management decisions regarding the country’s meta-population
  • £1,159 received in misc. restricted donations and £2,250 from the Betty Lawes Foundation went to cover 50% of costs incurred by APLRS Members for veterinary interventions needed for black rhinos during the period April 2019 to March 2020
  • $3,000 from an anonymous donor to the For Rangers initiative paid for lion collars for a project being coordinated by Sosian Ranch. It is hoped that better understanding of the pride’s movements will reduce predator-livestock conflict
  • $5,785 from the Bently Foundation was sent to cover travel expenses incurred by Linus Kariuki and Cedric Khayale (KWS Rhino Programme Coordinator and Rhino Scientist respectively) and John Gitonga (APLRS Administrator) in visiting sites throughout Kenya to chase and verify historical rhino-sighting data, in order to form annual planning meetings

Big Life Foundation, Kenya

  • $1,324 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust for rhino monitoring costs during the period January to June 2021. The Chyulu Hills NP holds a small but genetically important population of Eastern black rhino

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • $30,000 from the Holtzman Wildlife Foundation’s grant for a 2-year water-reticulation project (total award $60,000). Whilst Borana has a number of dams and pans, these are subject to rains and, although the larger of these hold perennial water, the increased pressure and intra-species competition (particularly between rhino) means that areas surrounding these water points become over-browsed. This affects both habitat and Borana’s Ecological Carrying Capacity for black rhino. As a result, across the Conservancy, there are areas where water reticulation must be improved. By building more water points, constructing pipelines and equipping boreholes with solar power, this project will increase available habitat for young dispersing male black rhinos that are establishing new territories, as well as open up habitat for other species
  • $7,445 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust for rhino monitoring costs during the period January to June 2021

Il Ngwesi Community Conservancy, Kenya

  • $662 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust for rhino monitoring costs during the period January to June 2021. Il Ngwesi is currently home to a very few white and black rhinos, but hopes to receive a founder population of black rhinos through the Rhino Impact Investment Project

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $29,283 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust for rhino monitoring costs during the period January to June 2021

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $50,000 from an anonymous donor to Save the Rhino International Inc. was used to buy a JCB backhoe loader, to assist with digging trenches to lay new pipes for water reticulation in the Pyramid section of the Conservancy
  • €7,500 from Stichting Wildlife paid for SMART devices and for the installation of further cameras for the CCTV remote camera system along the Ol Jogi’s wildlife corridors that allow animals to cross from one part of the Conservancy to others
  • $18,199 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust for rhino monitoring costs during the period January to June 2021

Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya

  • $30,110 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust for rhino monitoring costs during the period January to June 2021

Sera Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $2,978 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust for rhino monitoring costs during the period January to June 2021

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • £4,686 and £27,323 from The Royal Foundation of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge to pay for helicopter hours – the purchase of fuel and its transport to Okaukuejo, and for helicopter hire in order to carry out a block count, i.e. get an up-to-date census of white and black rhino numbers, in Etosha NP. A further £1,770 from the Royal Foundation paid for Ministry staff’s subsistence costs while in the field
  • $4,470 from core funds, and $33,510 plus $15,784 plus $9,304 from US Fish & Wildlife Service paid for GPS satellite and LoRa WAN rhino-tracking to aid rhino monitoring throughout the country, particularly for animals that were retrieved from outside Etosha NP or translocated to new areas
  • $12,057 from USFWS funds paid for predictive-modelling consultant to map poaching hotspots and inform anti-poaching interventions. $1,198 from USFWS funds paid for the hosting of Shiny app data to inform the modelling
  • $7,192 from USFWS paid for a data consultant to analyse SMART and Cybertracker data for the period April-June 2020 inclusive
  • £14,819 from The Royal Foundation of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge was sent to pay for helicopter spare parts and labour, related to the Etosha block count carried out in August and September 2020, to establish the sizes of Etosha National Park’s black and white rhino populations
  • $20,720 from a $57,000 grant from the Woodtiger Fund went to help pay for a new Rhino Recovery Vehicle (a Toyota Landcruiser V8 single-cab) and modifications, used in MEFT’s rhino translocation and immobilization operations, after the previous vehicle caught fire when grass got caught in the exhaust. An insurance claim is covering the rest of the cost of the new RRV
  • $3,867 from the Valerie G Merrin 2006 Trust paid for a new solar pump for Nyae Nyae Buffalo Camp, to increase water provision for its rhino population
  • $3,453 from the Woodtiger Fund to pay for modifications to the new Rhino Recovery Fund vehicle: tough guard panels, line-x loadbin, stainless-steel surround on tailgate, rear replacement bumper with double spare-wheel carriers, fridge bracket in the front cab, and labour for the modifications carried out
  • $2,406 from Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust funds to pay Dr Jeff Muntifering to conduct a rhino reintroduction feasibility assessment for Khaudum National Park
  • $3,036.65 from the Woodtiger Fund to pay Autohaus Windhoek for repairs to the 6×6 MAN service truck used for rhino translocations; together with another $6,972.76 to buy new tyres for the truck
  • $3,666.86 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust funds for further modifications to the Rhino Recovery Vehicle: a rear tow-bar, steel water and diesel tanks, a 12v fridge plug at the rear, and labour and supplies
  • £2,005.02 from a 3-year grant from The Royal Foundation of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge to pay Skycore Aviation for helicopter spares, relating to the Etosha block count carried out during August and September 2020; another £840.53 for 2 x Garmin GPS to be used by rangers when monitoring rhinos; £20,431.88 to pay Trio Aviation for helicopter inspection, repairs, spares, and export / import charges on spare parts; £4,996.41 to pay Swavet for drugs and equipment (scalpels, syringes etc.) used in rhino immobilisations
  • $11,055 from a USFWS grant paid for tracking devices to inform analysis of poaching hotspots
  • $842 from the Valerie G Merrin 2006 Trust funds to pay for a radio for the new Rhino Recovery Vehicle
  • $5,197 from the Valerie G Merrin 2006 Trust funds to pay for final modifications to the new Rhino Recovery vehicle, including side protection bars, spotlight, winch, compressor etc.
  • $5,000 from core funds to help pay for a LoRaWAN tower in one of Namibia’s national parks and LoRA tags to be implanted in rhino horns
  • $13,327 from the SFWS Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund to help pay for a LoRaWAN tower and LoRA tags
  • A 2-year grant from the Woodtiger Fund paid for a series of things: $4,350.87 for a for biannual service of the new Rhino Recovery Vehicle; $5,314.69 for three new tyres for the Astra rhino truck used in rhino translocations; $2,989.73 to Dr Axel Hartmann for fuel for the Astra rhino truck used in rhino translocations (veterinarian Dr Hartmann travelled with the truck during the translocations from Waterberg PP to Etosha NP); $2,990.25 to Dr Janine Sharpe for fuel, also for the Astra rhino truck used during rhino translocations; and $1,022.17 to Piet Beytell, Chief Conservation Scientist and National Rhino Coordinator, for fuel for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used in rhino translocations
  • A USFWS grant supported the following costs: $177.50 payment to Ferdinand Tjombe Consultancy to expedite a business visa for Dr Markus Hofmeyr to assist with annual rhino-dehorning operations; $4,057.18 for travel, daily expenses and Covid tests for Dr Hofmeyr, who travelled from South Africa to Namibia to assist with the operations; and $2,766 to Panthera for a consultant from Lusaka to visit Namibia to implement SMART monitoring for a prediction model that informs site managers about poaching hot spots and patrol deployments for maximum impact
  • $57.58 from core funds was used to help cover the costs of Tomas Tonata’s S&T during the rhino translocations from Waterberg Plateau Park to Etosha NP; and another £72.26 from core funds paid the rest of an invoice for the hire of an additional 6×6 flatbed truck to assist the two MEFT rhino trucks with the transport of rhino to Etosha
  • $3,463.64 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust paid for the hire of an additional 6×6 truck for two trips with white rhino to Nyae Nyae Conservancy, and $559 covered repairs to tents, bags and a rucksack used by MEFT staff during annual rhino operations

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • $30,000 from the Ceiley Foundation was allocated as follows: $10,189 Ugab team salaries, $10,286 for vehicle fuel and maintenance, $5,600 for misc. equipment purchase and repair, and $3,925 for Ugab team base expenses, for SRT’s financial year 2019-20
  • £584 from core funds helped cover vehicle running costs, rations and field day bonuses for the staff
  • $8,900 from For Rangers’ restricted funds went towards for vehicle fuel and maintenance for SRT’s tracker patrols
  • £7,221 from misc. res dons and our Rhino Covid-19 Crisis appeal during June 2020, together with £6,095 donated by Vanessa Buxton and £10,000 raised by Berry White via a virtual summer solstice festival, helped pay for vehicle running costs, rations and field day bonuses for the staff
  • £2,500 from David Williamson and Sue Ripley helped pay for general rhino monitoring costs: vehicle fuel and maintenance, rhino-sightings incentives and trackers’ rations. David and Sue had visited the Kunene Region in 1996, when they met Mike Hearn, after whom our paid Internship is named, and who had a memorable encounter with a rhino named Speedy
  • £629 received in misc. donations helped cover the costs of general rhino monitoring: vehicle fuel and maintenance, rhino-sightings incentives and trackers’ rations
  • $10,500 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation and another $1,061.18 from misc. restricted donations to help pay for rations and vehicle fuel and running costs and associated administration costs
  • $4,336.75 from AAZK Bowling for Rhinos paid for 2 x SMART data collection devices and 5 x solar-power systems, together with a further $12.62 from core funds

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • $15,159 from US Fish & Wildlife Service will help to cover the cost of uMkhuze’s rhino monitor’s salary. Budget cuts at the managing agency, EKZNW, mean that this important post has to be funded by external donors. A much more detailed database is being built up of the Reserve’s white and black rhino populations as a result of this dedicated position

South Sudan

  • $1,000 from core funds agreed at Trustees’ meeting for next phase of searches for any remaining Northern white rhinos

Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary Rhino, Tanzania

  • Several grants were sent to help pay for fuel and maintenance for water bowser, brush cutter etc. in order to keep the Sanctuary functioning in the 6-month period July-December 2020; Covid-19: $16,180 from core funds, $9,975 from Tusk Trust and $1,969 from Zoo Dvur Kralove

Lowveld Rhino Trust, Zimbabwe

  • $9,900 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation was sent to help cover salaries and vehicle running costs for the scout teams responsible for monitoring black and white rhinos in Bubye Valley Conservancy
  • £1,342 from core funds and £1,178 from miscellaneous restricted donations received via our website to pay for rhino-monitoring data form the period February-August 2020 inclusive to be entered into LRT’s database for further analysis, as well as for the creation and maintenance of LRT’s new website

Environmental Investigation Agency, UK

  • $29,750 from Save the Rhino International Inc. was awarded to the Environmental Investigation Agency for a project entitled “Strengthening legal and policy frameworks in China”. The EIA will advocate for the adoption of a new State Council order and/or amendments to China’s wildlife laws; to encourage and amplify diverse voices calling for an end to trade in threatened wildlife; and to undertake research and produce analysis to support policy recommendations

TRAFFIC-China

  • A final £14,983 from the grant from the Betty Liebert Trust was sent to TRAFFIC-China as the last payment for a project entitled “Save the rhino through social media”

TRAFFIC-Viet Nam

  • Final payments were also sent to TRAFFIC in Vietnam to conclude two other projects, “Reducing the demand for rhino horn in the Vietnamese communist party and government” and “Reducing the demand for ivory & rhino horn from Chinese tourists in Viet Nam”: £5,000 from the Simon Gibson Charitable Trust; £6,451.54 from various donations (Endurance Estates, Gonville Hotel, Lucy Hattingh, Anthony May, and Oliver Bruendler); £5,416.46 from the Betty Liebert Trust; and £1,817 received in misc. restricted donations

Education for Nature-Vietnam, Viet Nam

  • €4,000 from Association Ecofaune (Zoo de la Barben) and another €4,000 from Zoologischer Garten Berlin was awarded for a project to aimed at addressing wildlife consumer and internet crimes in Viet Nam by enhancing enforcement work. More specifically, the money will pay for a consumer crime survey in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City and an internet wildlife crime enforcement campaign aimed at reducing the availability of rhino horn and other wildlife products for sale via the internet

Indian Rhino Vision, 2020

  • $3,969 from Wilhelma Zoo Stuttgart to be used for the wildlife crime investigation and enforcement programme in Assam

African Rhino Specialist Group, Africa

  • $14,400 from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Ltd to pay for the production of issue no. 61 of Pachyderm, the journal of the IUCN SSC African and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups and the African Elephant Specialist Group. The journal is available to read online 
  • £1,000 from core funds towards the production of issue #62 of Pachyderm, and another £176.84 from misc. restricted donations
  • A total of $8,215.44 towards the production of issue #62 of Pachyderm, thanks to grants from the International Rhino Foundation ($993.84), Save the Elephants ($6,982) and misc. restricted donations ($239.60)
  • $3,500 from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Limited towards the costs of editing and producing issue #62

Canine unit project, Africa

  • $300 from an INL grant was used to pay Dr Chris Aycock for online Zoom training for working group participants. The workshop we had originally intended to organise in Lusaka in May 2020 had to be postponed due to the Covid-19 pandemic, so instead we have been organising a programme of talks and tutorials, and have circulated relevant information via a WhatsApp group

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • $11,349 from For Rangers’ restricted funds to pay for rangers’ rations at Lewa, Borana, Ol Jogi, Ol Pejeta and Sosian Conservancies: tea, sugar, rice, maize meal flour, baking flour, cooking fat and soap
  • $9,270 from For Rangers’ restricted funds to pay for rations ($1,620), rebuilding Bingham camp after floods washed it away ($2,000), radio batteries ($150), solar power maintenance ($1,000) and communications (airtime and internet etc.) ($4,500) at Enonkishu Conservancy in the Masai Mara
  • $24,280 from For Rangers’ funds to pay for rangers’ salaries and rations, and then another $720 to pay for rations for Sosian Ranch’s rangers: tea, sugar, rice, maize meal flour, baking flour, cooking fat, beef mix and soap
  • $13,596 and another $13,681 from For Rangers’ restricted funds to pay for rangers’ rations at Lewa, Borana, Ol Jogi, Ol Pejeta and Sosian Conservancies as well as Loisaba, Il Ngwesi Community and Il Mamusi Conservancies and the Ngare Ndare Forest Trust : tea, sugar, rice, maize meal flour, baking flour, cooking fat and soap
  • $28,593 from For Rangers’ funds to pay for renewal of Viva365 life insurance policy for Kenyan rangers from 13 June 2020 to 12 June 2021
  • $7,323 from For Rangers’ funds to pay for rangers’ salaries, rations, training and radios at the Ngare Ndare Forest Trust
  • $1,371 from ForRangers’ to pay for rations for community conservancies in Laikipia, including Naibunga, Il Mamusi, Il Ngwesi and Ngare Ndare Forest Trust
  • £319 from For Rangers’ restricted funds to pay the balance on a previous invoice for rations that was incorrectly calculated (for community conservancies in Laikipia, including Naibunga, Il Mamusi, Il Ngwesi and NgareNdare Forest Trust)
  • $6,300 to the Masai Mara Wildlife Conservancies Association, thanks to donations from Gary and Mary Pinkus and from Ernie and Diane Burgess in response to the 2020 MARAthon
  • $17,897.70 from the grant from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs for Project UPTICK paid for the shipping costs of 282 x bergens, day sacks and webbings & 564 x torches from the UK to Kenya
  • $930 from INL for Project UPTICK for 2 x training instructor days to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa
  • £5,729 for items for Patrol Medic kits (8 each for rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa) for: 72 x tourniquet; 120 field dressings; 72 chest seal valves; 96 abdominal bandages; 72 Sam splints; 24 lightweight stretchers; 168 rolls of zinc oxide tape; 26 tubs of Sudocrem; 48 boxes x 100 pairs of vinyl gloves; 24 pairs of nail scissors; & 24 combat trauma bags, thanks to funds from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • $1,000 from Dave and Heidi Welch, in response to the 2020 MARAthon, to the Masai Mara Wildlife Conservancies Association
  • We made a series of payments with funds from the INL grant for Project UPTICK to buy medical kit for the 23 rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies to receive patrol medic training: £757.86 for 26 bottles of Sudocream antisceptic lotion, 48 boxes of 100 vinyl gloves, and 24 pairs of nail scissors; £198.96 for another 24 pairs of nail scissors; £488.92 for 24 x each of boxes of 10 x eye dressings, sterile calico bandages x packs of 10, boxes of 100 waterproof plasters, and splinter forceps and pointed forceps; £657.31 for 69 x 4″ Israeli abdominal bandages with pressure bar + gauze + gloves; and another £25 for misc. kit
  • $900 from INL for Project UPTICK for 51 Degrees’ instructor’s time writing up post-course reports for rangers taking part in training courses during February 2021
  • £7,200 from George and Lucilla Stephenson helped to pay for the management of a new organisation, ANI Partners Ltd, that will coordinate the management of Lolldaiga and Ole Naishu Conservancies, and more dynamic conservation-development-focused cooperation with key neighbouring properties including Mukugodo Forest, Il Ngwesi Community Conservancy and Makurian Group Ranch, plus another $30,000 from the Sidekick Foundation for ANI Partners Ltd

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • $21,769 from INL funds for 92 bergens, daysacks and webbings, and 184 battery-operated head torches, for Borana’s National Police Reservists and general security
  • $6,872 from INL funds for 184 x 2.5 litre Camelbaks for Borana’s NPRs and general security rangers, and for 16 x patrol medic bleeder packs
  • $33,400 from INL funds to pay a 75% deposit on uniforms for Borana’s 32 NPRs and 60 general security rangers, who will each receive:  4x shirts, 4x pairs of trousers, 2x jackets, 2x bush hats, 1x raincoats, 4x Tshirts, 2x belts, 2x jumpers, 10x pairs of socks, 2x woolly hats and 4x pairs woolly gloves
  • $1,915.20 from INL funds to pay for 3 of Borana’s rangers to receive commanders’ training in December 2020
  • $15,247 from INL funds to pay for 92 pairs of boots for Borana’s Anti-Poaching Unit & general security rangers
  • $11,294.90 from INL funds to pay the remaining 25% balance of the uniform order: 4x shirts, 4x pairs of trousers, 2x jackets, 2x bush hats, 1x raincoats, 4x Tshirts, 2x belts, 2x jumpers, 10x pairs of socks, 2x woolly hats and 4x pairs woolly gloves

Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya

  • $9,825 from INL for Project UPTICK for 51 degrees’ training instructor days to train KWS staff based at Tsavo East National Park’s Ops Room on how to use new IT equipment and Earth Ranger
  • $5,937.50 from INL for Project UPTICK for 51 Degrees’ training instructor days to train KWS staff at Tsavo Regional HQ on the ER User Basic and ER Management Basic courses delivered at Tsavo Regional HQ, plus internal travel expenses

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $23,189 from INL funds for 98 bergens, daysacks and webbings, and 196 battery-operated head torches, for Ol Jogi’’s National Police Reservists and general security
  • $7,248 from INL funds for 196 x 2.5 litre Camelbaks for Lewa’s NPRs and general security rangers, and for 16 x patrol medic bleeder packs
  • $16,637 of the total order (75% deposit upfront) from Blaise Investments, from the INL grant for Project UPTICK, to pay for uniforms for 36 NPRs and 62 general security rangers, who each receive: 4x shirts, 1x jackets, 2x bush hats, 1x raincoats, 4x Tshirts, 2x belts, 2x jumpers, 2x woolly hats and 4x pairs woolly gloves
  • $2,553.60 from INL funds to pay for four of Lewa’s rangers to take part in a 10-day commanders’ training course in December 2020
  • $9,096 from INL funds and $10,460 from Lewa’s donors, to pay for 118 pairs of boots for Lewa’s Anti-Poaching Unit and general security rangers. These British-military standard boots will last more than five years
  • $5,626.98 from INL funds to pay the remaining 25% balance of the uniform order
  • $25,594.24 from INL funds via Project UPTICK: $20,137.60 for 31 of Lewa’s rangers to undergo the Rhino Tactical Refresher Course #1; $3,637.76 for eight of Lewa’s rangers to do Patrol Medic training; and $1,818.88 for one of Lewa’s rangers to benefit from the 30-day Basic training course

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $21,769 from INL funds for 92 bergens, daysacks and webbings, and 184 battery-operated head torches, for Ol Jogi’’s National Police Reservists and general security
  • $6,872 from INL funds for 184 x 2.5 litre Camelbaks for Ol Jogi’’s NPRs and general security rangers, and for 16 x patrol medic bleeder packs
  • $33,400 from INL funds to pay a 75% deposit on uniforms for Ol Jogi’’s 32 NPRs and 60 general security rangers, who will each receive:  4x shirts, 4x pairs of trousers, 2x jackets, 2x bush hats, 1x raincoats, 4x Tshirts, 2x belts, 2x jumpers, 10x pairs of socks, 2x woolly hats and 4x pairs woolly gloves
  • $1,915.20 from INL funds to pay for three of Ol Jogi’s rangers to participate in a 10-day commanders’ training course in December 2020
  • €5,000 euros from Zoo Hannover to help pay for new uniforms for Ol Jogi’s 31 rhino monitors. With growing black and white rhino populations, Ol Jogi needed to employ additional rangers during 2020, and aims to provide each ranger with two complete sets of uniform per year
  • $15,247 from INL funds paid for 92 pairs of boots for Ol Jogi’s Anti-Poaching Unit & general security rangers
  • $11,294.90 from INL funds to paid the remaining 25% balance of the uniform order
  • $10,913.28 from INL funds via Project UPTICK was used to pay for ranger training: $7,275.52 for 4 rangers to benefit from a 30-day basic training course; and $3,637.76 for 8 rangers to participate in an 8-day Patrol Medic course

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • $3,250 from core funds and $54,500 from US Fish & Wildlife Service to pay Invictus K9 for their instructors’ training of dog handlers
  • $54,550 from USFWS funds to pay Invictus K9 for instructors’ training of dog handlers

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • $11,100 from For Rangers’ restricted funds was use to buy rations for SRT’s trackers, who are out in the field for many days each month in an extremely remote and inhospitable environment

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • $500 from the Bernard F. and Alva B. Gimbel Foundation for camp maintenance
  • $22,647 from US Fish & Wildlife Service for ranger camp maintenance
  • $16,985 from USFWS for ration packs, used by Field Rangers when on extended (i.e. multi-day-night) patrols in remote parts of the Park
  • $12,739 from USFWS in July 20 for camouflage overalls for the Park’s Field Rangers
  • €10,000 from Réserve Africaine de Sigean and €3,000 from Safari de Peaugres; to be used to buy a quadbike and some law-enforcement / maintenance equipment, including rifle cleaning kits, oils and pepper spray, and to make repairs to vehicles, pumps, electricals etc.

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • $22,575 from US Fish & Wildlife Service was used to pay for four more solar power installations in ranger picket camps, which will provide light at night and power to charge cellphones and radios
  • USFWS
  • $9,200 from USFWS was used to buy uniforms for uMkhuze’s Field Rangers and Section Rangers
  • $17,693 from USFWS was allocated to ranger tactical training. Budgets have been severely cut at the managing agency, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, and financial problems have been exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic, so this funding for ranger training is particularly welcome
  • $9,383 from core funds went towards misc. camp equipment and for solar-power installation at rangers’ camps
  • €383 from core funds was used to pay for aviation insurance for Eduard Goosen, Michael Langley and N. McDonogh during training for their light-sports aircraft pilots’ licences

Rhino Fund Uganda, Uganda

  • $10,000 from For Rangers’ restricted funds was awarded to RFU to help cover ranger salaries and rations at Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary, home to Uganda’s only breeding population of Southern white rhino. Covid-19 has seen all tourism to Ziwa cease, with consequent lack of income
  • Another $22,000 from ForRangers’ restricted funds was awarded as an emergency grant to cover support-staff salaries and operating costs (vehicle fuel and maintenance costs) for two months at Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary

Rhino Resource Center, UK

  • As in previous years, we awarded £1,000 from our core funds to the Rhino Resource Center, which is an invaluable online reference source for rhino conservationists, field practitioners and students alike. http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • £8,673 from Peter and Birgit Lawrence helped pay for improved ablutions and water provision (a soak-away extension, tank stand and solar-powered hot-water geyser) at the Rhino and Elephant Protection Unit base in North Luangwa NP, as well as fodder for one of the rhinos that needed boma care, ranger salaries etc.
  • £1,000 from core funds was sent as a reward for two of NLCP’s scouts, Paimolo and Cosmas, for exceptional dedication shown during an emergency rhino operation
  • $8,400 from the Wildcat Foundation’s grant was used to pay for a specialist tracker training course for scouts from North Luangwa’s Rhino and Elephant Protection Unit. A further $2,250 paid Simon Leak, trainer with Big 5 Protection, for travel expenses incurred while delivering Specialist tracking trainer course for REPU scouts in North Luangwa NP in Sept Wildcat Foundation
  • $13,000 from the Wildcat Foundation grant to pay Big 5 Protection for a Specialist tracking trainer course for the REPU scouts in North Luangwa NP in Jan-Mar 2021

African Rhino Specialist Group (AfRSG)

  • $8,236 from Save the Rhino International Inc. for the Scientific Officer’s consultancy fees for days worked on core Secretariat business for the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group during the period January to June 2020. The AfRSG Secretariat performs a range of services, including preparing IUCN / TRAFFIC reports for CITES’ Conferences of the Parties, updating the IUCN Red List, advising rhino-range States on the implementation of national rhino strategies, etc.
  • $18,259 from USFWS for the Scientific Officer’s consultancy fees for days worked on core business for the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group during the period January to June 2020, and another $3,361 from USFWS for the AfRSG Scientific Officer’s travel and subsistence while attending meetings on behalf of the AfRSG
  • $1,080 from USFWS for the AfRSG Chair’s travel and subsistence while attending meetings on behalf of the IUCN SSC AfRSG

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • €4,000 donated by long-time supporter Ales Weiner was used to help cover the salary of the APLRS Administrator, John Gitonga, for the period July 2020-June 2021. John is based in the Rhino Programme Coordinator’s office in the KWS headquarters in Nairobi, and works alongside the RPC to monitor and encourage the implementation of Kenya’s Black Rhino Action Plan

Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary, Tanzania

  • £11,761 from core funds and £260 received in miscellaneous restricted donations were used to pay for Dr Rob Brett and Dr Rob Small, both of Fauna and Flora International, to conduct a review of the Sanctuary’s black rhinos’ breeding performance and to make recommendations for the future management of Mkomazi, following the handover of the Sanctuary’s management from the George Adamson Wildlife Preservation Trust to the Tanzanian National Parks Authority. With the publication of a new national rhino strategy, it is excellent timing to be thinking about the role that Mkomazi can play in national meta-population management, as Tanzania’s third-largest black rhino population

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • £12,000 from the CHK Foundation for Borana’s Mobile Health Clinic. Set up in 2005, the Borana Mobile Health Clinic (BMC) works in partnership with the Ministry of Health. Since then, the BMC has been providing basic health care, health lectures, HIV Aids awareness, antenatal advice, child immunisation programmes and family planning to Borana’s neighbouring communities. The majority of Borana’s neighbours do not have adequate access to basic health care and consequently have to rely heavily on the Mobile Clinic to provide this. The Clinic’s headquarters is based at Borana HQ and the team consists of two nurses, a community health worker trained in nutrition and hygiene, and a driver. Together, they visit 10 communities on a 2-week rotation treating more than 700 patients per month and travelling more than 1,000 miles in the Clinic’s Landrover. The nurses also provide sanitation advice, support and counselling to students at eight schools, as well as health education, focusing on hygiene and nutrition, for members of the community. The areas the clinic currently visits are: Lotasha, Loruko, Mithatene, Mbuju, Ndurumoru, Ldaranja, Ltirim, Tassia and Ltinga
  • £1,636.91 received in misc. restricted donations, together with $2,105 donated by Johnny Beveridge, was sent to pay for Days for Girls Supreme menstrual kits, distributed via the Borana Mobile Clinic and Community Development Office to female students in the Borana Education Support Programme. Each $10 donation includes a kit demonstration & an Ambassador of Women Health training from Pauline, the Borana Mobile Clinic nurse. The training will teach girls about their body development, menstrual cycle, menstrual hygiene & other reproductive health issues

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • $25,000 from the Disney Conservation Fund, the second instalment of a 2-year grant of $50,000, went to NLCP for Lolesha Luangwa, the conservation education programme that targets 21 schools in the Game Management Areas surrounding the Park. This is part of a “hearts and minds” approach, which builds knowledge, empathy and responsibility for the Park’s black rhino population, and which is partly responsible for NLCP’s zero-poaching record. This grant will help cover Lolesha Luangwa’s running costs for the period July 2020 to June 2021
  • $20,000 from For Rangers’ restricted funds was used to help pay salaries for the community scouts working in the Game Management Areas surrounding North Luangwa National Park. Covid-19 has meant that all trophy hunting in the GMAs has ceased and, with it, all income for the community scouts. NLCP has taken on the task of funding the salaries throughout the pandemic, to ensure that the scouts are not driven to poaching through loss of income

Lowveld Rhino Trust, Zimbabwe

  • We paid £12 from our core funds to renew the Lowveld Rhino Trust’s website domain name renewal up until 1 April 2022

Association of Private and Community Land Rhino Sanctuaries

  • $900,000 from an anonymous donor went to the AgWild project: the formation of a conservation beef cooperative that uses specialised and dedicated leadership to coordinate collaboration to achieve the scale that leads to optimised land-use, enhanced and diverse revenue streams, economies of scale and subsequent financial sustainability. The cooperative comprises Ol Maisor Ranch, Sosian Ranch, Suyian, Loisaba Conservancy and Mugie Conservancy, five contiguous properties in Northern Laikipia, representing more than 200,000 acres of both critical wildlife habitat and food and revenue generation for the county of Laikipia

As always, our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.