A ranger smiles with his dog. A ranger smiles with his dog.

Thank you for making our grants possible!

Here are the grants that Save the Rhino has made to programmes within the last 12 months.

Click on the months below to find out more about our recent grants.

More information on how we spend money can be found in our Audited Accounts on the Charity Commission’s website and Impact reports (latest copy viewable here).

If you’d like to understand more about our funding priorities, take a look at our grant-making policy. Further guidelines on applying for a grant can be found here.

Protection, law enforcement, investigations and intelligence

Gashaka Gumti National Park, Nigeria

  • $10,000 from funds raised by the For Rangers initiative to Gashaka Gumti National Park in Nigeria, pay for Iridium satellite handsets, antennae etc. to improve communications in the Park
  • £5 from core funds for transfer fees

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • $3,573 from a multi-year grant from the Wildcat Foundation paid for anti-poaching operations and equipment by and for North Luangwa National Park’s rangers
  • £5 from core funds for transfer fees

Nsumbu Tanganyika Conservation Project, Zambia

  • $2,903 from the Wildcat Foundation went to NTCP in Zambia for anti-poaching operations. NTCP Zambia is another programme run in a partnership between the Frankfurt Zoological Society (FZS) and the Department of National Parks and Wildlife. NTCP hopes to receive rhinos at some point in the future, and is busy preparing the Park’s infrastructure and ranger force for an increased emphasis on endangered species

Biological management

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • $30,000 from the Ceiley Foundation was allocated as follows: $10,189 Ugab team salaries, $10,286 for vehicle fuel and maintenance, $5,600 for misc. equipment purchase and repair, and $3,925 for Ugab team base expenses, for SRT’s financial year 2019-20
  • £5 from core funds for transfer fees

Capacity building

Rhino Resource Center, UK

  • As in previous years, we awarded £1,000 from our core funds to the Rhino Resource Center, which is an invaluable online reference source for rhino conservationists, field practitioners and students alike. http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/

As always, our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

We sent out a total of £201,411 in grants, bringing the year’s grants sent out to a total of £2,445,622, as follows:

We sent $1,268 from a United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) grant to pay for travel and subsistence expenses incurred by the Chair of the IUCN SSC’s African Rhino Specialist Group.

We were very happy to award £10,488.80 from funds raised by participants in the 2019 ForRangers Ultra to pay for a new CT scan room for the Nanyuki Cottage Hospital. This hospital is used by Laikipia’s rangers as well as the rest of the local population, and the new diagnostic capability will greatly enhance medical provision in the area.

£7,150 funds raised by readers of Sporting Rifle magazine was sent to Big Game Parks in Eswatini (formerly known as Swaziland) to pay for the construction of security watch towers and installation of solar-powered geysers for hot water.

Although we no longer prioritise support for Big Life Foundation in Kenya, because the Chyulu Hills National Park’s rhino population is too small, we were happy to send £95 received via our website that was intended for Big Life.

We awarded a total of £12,304 to Education for Nature-Vietnam, to mobilise the National Wildlife Protection Network of volunteers to monitor and report wildlife crime and raise public awareness. Our thanks to Zoo de la Barben (€4,000), Zoo-Berlin and Tierpark Berlin (€8,000), Lucy Hattingh (£1,500) and other donors who made this grant possible.

We sent a total of £28,069 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, which continues to be targeted by rhino poaching syndicates. A number of donors awarded grants for to help pay for the switchover from analogue to digital radios, including Bioparco di Roma (€5,000), Réserve Africaine de Sigean (€5,000) and the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation ($9,900). Other funders’ grants and donations are being put towards ranger equipment: Parco Natura Viva (ARCA Foundation) (€1,254.68) and Zoo de la Boissière du Doré (€1,500). Finally, grants from several donors are being used to help pay for quadbikes, used particularly by the teams responsible for checking and maintaining the Park’s fence line: Friends of Berlin Zoos (€1,000), Knuthenborg Safaripark (€1,146.40), donations via our website (£2,594) and Zoo Zlin (€4,853).

We awarded £10,000 from our core funds to the International Rhino Foundation for work in the Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area, Indonesia, to help clear Arenga palm, an invasive species that – if left unchecked – prevents Javan rhinos’ preferred food plants from growing, thus effectively limiting the ecological carrying capacity of Ujung Kulon National Park and the adjacent Gunung Honje area. We hope to make further grants for this work once the anticipated negative impact of Covid-19 on our fundraising ability is reversed.

We sent grants totalling £30,914 to Lewa Wildlife Conservancy in Kenya. €4,750 will help support Lewa’s canine unit, thanks to grants from Bioparco di Roma, Fundación Bioparc Valencia and Rotterdam Zoo (the other half of their grants went to Ol Jogi for its canine unit). $18,842 raised by participants in the 2019 For Rangers Ultra paid for equipment for Lewa’s anti-poaching unit: 7 x Nikon cameras and portable solar panels; 10 x GPSs and binoculars; and 37 x sleeping bags and pairs of boots. Another $12,000 raised by Ultra runners paid for solar-panel installations at four ranger outposts, who now therefore have power to charge phones, torches and digital radios.

We sent $20,000 from core funds to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, which is responsible for monitoring the black and white rhino populations in Bubye Valley Conservancy. Our grant will pay for vehicle fuel and maintenance for five new digital radios. We also paid £90 to renew the Trust’s annual website.

We sent a series of grants to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, which manages the country’s national parks and oversees the conservation of all black rhinos in Namibia, whether one state, private or community land. $983 from the Valerie G Merrin 2006 Trust paid for repairs to a chainsaw used for dehorning operations and for a field fridge for DNA samples. $32,233 from the Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge paid for two mobile accommodation units for Etosha’s K9 unit handlers. Another $9,465 from the Royal Foundation was used to buy helicopter hours for dehorning operations; these were planned for May but might need to be postponed if lockdown conditions continue. Finally, we sent $2,275 from USFWS to pay the March fees of a consultant employed to work on SMART data applications for the Ministry.

We sent £596 from the Wildcat Foundation to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia to pay for spare parts for law-enforcement equipment.

Thanks to the ForRangers fundraising initiative, we were able to award £25,016 to the Northern Rangelands Trust in Kenya: $9,700 paid for scene-of-crime training for NRT’s Coastal unit; $14,589 paid for patrol equipment and a new kitchen / mess for Il Ngwesi Conservancy, which is due to receive black rhinos within the next five years; and $7,465 is paying for the construction of a new kitchen and toilet block for Sera Conservancy.

Nsumbu Tanganyika Conservation Project in Zambia received £3,933 thanks to a grant from the Wildcat Foundation for law-enforcement equipment. The hope is that black rhinos might be reintroduced to Nsumbu National Park at some point in the future.

We sent three grants to Ol Jogi Conservancy in Laikipia County, Kenya. €4,750 will help support Lewa’s canine unit, thanks to grants from Bioparco di Roma, Fundación Bioparc Valencia and Rotterdam Zoo (the other half of their grants went to Lewa for its canine unit). €1,998.62 from Tallinn Zoo / Foundation Lutreola is being allocated to ranger salaries. And £6,500 from Yorkshire Wildlife Park is paying for the purchase and installation of remote cameras at five more wildlife corridors and two relay points, as well as to procure and install a server at Ol Jogi’s Operations Room.

Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia is one of the field programmes we have supported since our registration as a charity in 1994, so we were delighted to be able to send $4,500 from an anonymous donor to support the work of the Wildlife Crime Coordinator, and we also sent over $700 from core funds and £1,954 from West Midland Safari Park and other donors via our website for vehicle running costs and rations.

Finally, we sent over several grants to help pay the salary of Michael Langley, the rhino monitor in uMkhuze Game Reserve in South Africa. Our thanks to the Ernest Kleinwort Charitable Trust (£5,000), the Marjorie Coote Animal Charities Fund (£3,000) and other donors who gave £582 for uMkhuze via our website.

As ever, our thanks to everyone who made these donations possible.

We sent out a total of £211,353 in grants as follows:

Thanks to a grant from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Limited, we sent $13,450 to pay the first instalment of the cost of producing Issue 61 of Pachyderm, the journal of the African and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups and the African Elephant Specialist Group.

We paid Conservation Alpha $6,325 from a Bently Foundation grant for consultancy work on drafting documents on behalf of the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries, the need for which arose out of the Laikipia rhino range expansion workshop we organised and held in November 2019. These draft documents include site selection criteria, an assessment tool for the APLRS to use when commenting on proposals to the national Rhino Steering Committee, and a ‘Guardianship Agreement’ for private and community sites and the Kenya Wildlife Service.

From funds raised by the ForRangers Ultra 2019 runners, and other donations to the ForRangers initiative, we awarded two grants: $5,375 for Local Ocean Trust’s anti-poaching unit, to help pay salaries, and buy uniforms and equipment; and we also sent ££6,142 to Dip Station, which is delivering ranger functional fitness training, including the use of the gym equipment previously bought with ForRangers funds.

Thanks to the annual grants from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, we sent $20,224 to Borana Conservancy in Kenya to pay for the refurbishment of ranger accommodation.

We forwarded £30 received via website donations to the International Rhino Foundation, which is supporting wildlife-crime training and materials for investigators, prosecutors and the judiciary in Assam.

We also forwarded another £72 to the International Rhino Foundation for the Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area in Indonesia.

We sent €7,000 received from Dublin Zoo and another €5,000 from Fondation le Pal Nature in France to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, to help cover the costs of monitoring Bubye Valley Conservancy’s black and white rhino populations.

We sent a total of £70,771 to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, for a number of projects and thanks to several donors. We sent $475 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust funds to pay for repairs to air-conditioning unit in the rhino recovery vehicle, used for rhino management operations in the field. Another $1,344 from Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust funds paid for repairs to the canvas gazebos used to shade immobilized rhinos during immobilisations. $3,773 from the Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge paid for two Grundfos pumps with cooling sleeves for waterhole rehabilitation in Etosha National Park. The Royal Foundation’s grant also paid for the following: $3,176 for a consultant to carry out SMART data applications and analysis; $5,545 for helicopter maintenance, spares and labour; $2,230 for aviation gas for the fixed-wing aircraft used in rhino management operations; and $432 for new vehicle rims. $12,749 from USFWS RTCF paid for modifications to a Landcruiser and for dog crates / equipment etc. for the expanding canine unit in Namibia. We paid $50,786 to Namibia Helicopter Services from USFWS funds for chopper flying time for dehorning operations on rhino custodian properties and in the Kunene Region. $5,644 from USFWS bought 15 x cellphones, pouches and charging cables, to enable the implementation of SMART monitoring in Etosha NP. And a further $5,445 paid for more work by the consultant to carry out SMART data applications and analysis.

We made several grants to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme (NLCP) in Zambia, where a Key 2 population of black rhinos is thriving. $10,000 from For Rangers funds to pay for two new pickets for the Rhino and Elephant Protection Unit For Rangers. $7,896 from the Wildcat Foundation paid for anti-poaching equipment. Ranger welfare and motivation is an important part of any field programme’s work, and the Wildcat Foundation’s grant includes provision for several scouts to come to London each year to participate in the London Marathon. This year, NLCP hopes to bring seven people to the UK to run the marathon, and we spent £2,223 on flights and £551 on branded clothing for the runners.

A grant from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust of $18,040 went to the Northern Rangelands Trust in Kenya, to help pay for ranger training and rations for Sera Conservancy, Kenya’s newest community conservancy.

We sent $5,640 to the Nsumbu Tanganyika Conservation Project, thanks to a grant from the Wildcat Foundation for anti-poaching equipment.

Fundraising by participants in the ForRangers Ultra 2019 enabled a grant of £23,020 to Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, to pay for new ranger accommodation (two blocks, each with three units) and an ablutions block, mess and kitchen including cooker, utensils and kitchen equipment, plus training.

We sent £758 received in donations via our website to the International Rhino Foundation (IRF) for the Rhino Protection Unit programme in Indonesia. The IRF and its in-country partner YABI focuses on Way Kambas, Bukit Barisan Selatan and Ujung Kulon National Parks.

Thanks to yet another grant from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, we sent $17,333 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, to help pay the costs of its intelligence and informers programme. No rhinos have been poached in the Kunene Region, the area in which Save the Rhino Trust patrols, since August 2017.

We sent a total of £5,601 to the International Rhino Foundation for the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia, thanks to donations of £3,000 by Kenneth Donaldson and Cathy Dean, £1,000 by Katherine Martin and other donations received via our website.

Finally, donations to the ForRangers initiative enabled a grant of $15,000 to African Parks, to pay for 235 pairs of cross-country trainers for rangers working in Garamba National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

We are deeply grateful to all our donors, without whom none of these grants would be possible.

We sent out a stonking total of £528,424 in grants as follows:

Thanks to the ForRangers initiative, we were able to send a grant of $10,000 to Sosian Conservancy in Kenya to pay for new accommodation and uniforms for its National Police Reservists, and for a patrol car to be refurbished.

We sent grants totalling £36,392 to Borana Conservancy in Kenya. Our thanks to Ardea Partners, which donated $40,000 to help cover general operating costs. Borana named four of its black rhinos in honour of the gift: Mumu, Dudu, Honey and Poppy. Other donors supporting general operating and rhino monitoring costs at Borana were: Dawn Cooke and family ($5,000); Allen Northcutt ($500); the Taliaferro Family Fund ($1,000); and St George’s School in Newport, Rhode Island, where some of the students held a dress-down day for the ‘Crash and Herd’ initiative.

We also sent a series of grants to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa. A total of £180,211 was made up as follows: a grant of $25,000 from Ardea Partners will mostly likely be used to pay for 3 or 4 quadbikes, unless more urgent priorities crop up; $8,003 from our core funds will be used to buy equipment and/or refurbish ranger accommodation and ablution blocks; $80,034 from US Fish & Wildlife Service will be spent on vehicle tires ($16,136), camp maintenance ($22,647), ranger equipment ($11,527), ration packs ($16,985) and camouflage overalls ($12,739); and $123,000 from the Woodtiger Fund will pay for 5 motorbikes ($36,000), Field Ranger uniforms and boots ($53,000) and ration packs $33,500.

Two grants from European zoos enabled a total grant of €3,500 to Indian Rhino Vision 2020, to pay for wildlife crime training and materials in Assam, India. Our thanks to Parc de Branfere in France, which donated €1,500 and to Rotterdam Zoo, which awarded €2,000.

£618 from core funds was used to pay to ship 27 x camera-traps, metal cases to protect them, SD cards and chargers from the USA to Kenya, where they were handed over to the Kenya Wildlife Service to deploy in rhino sites throughout the country.

Another $10,000 raised by the ForRangers initiative was used to pay African Ascents for a mountain-rescue training course for the Kenya Wildlife Service mountain rescue team on Mt Kenya.

We sent £1,800 from core funds to the Lowveld Rhino Trust, to pay for the entry of rhino monitoring data in its database for the period May 2019-January 2020 inclusive.

The Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, which is responsible for all black and white rhinos in national parks, benefited from £23,915-worth of grants. $18,650 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust and $993 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust paid for a new custom-designed trailer for black rhino crates for translocations within Namibia. Another $3,084 from the .Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust paid for air-con units for the storeroom and tea room for the DNA storage room in Windhoek. And $8,448 from USFWS paid for a new black rhino crate.

We awarded a total of £26,377 to the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania. £691 from our core funds paid the flight costs for Dr Rob Brett, who we commissioned to carry out a review of the Sanctuary’s breeding performance and carrying capacity, together with development recommendations for the Sanctuary’s future management, once handover from the George Adamson Wildlife Preservation Trust to the Tanzanian National Parks Authority (TANAPA) is completed on 31 March 2020. Another $2,910 from core funds paid for rations for the MRS rangers, together with a USFWS grant of $30,590 for Mkomazi’s Operations Manager’s salary, for carpenter and welder work on the sensor-network system, machinery and spares for plant, a new uniport (ranger accommodation), and rations, uniforms and boots for MRS personnel.

We sent $1,251 to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia to cover the import costs of law-enforcement equipment for North Luangwa National Park’s scouts, thanks to a grant from the Wildcat Foundation.

Another $1,251 paid for the import of more equipment for Nsumbu Tanganyika Conservation Project in Zambia, which is restoring habitat and putting in place infrastructure and an increased scout complement, so that one day it too might become a black rhino site. A further $8,780, also from the Wildcat Foundation, paid for more kit for the anti-poaching teams.

USFWS awarded a grant of $68,937 for Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya, which is home to a Key 2 black rhino population. $21,210 is paying for ranger uniforms, $8,664 for rations and $39,063 for water reticulation (replacing damaged or leaking pipes and water troughs used by wildlife and for ranger ablution blocks. Save the Rhino added another $5,000 from our own core funds for more waterworks.

Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, a programme we’ve supported since our formation in 1994, received a total of £72,319 from us in January. $25,000 from Ardea Partners is being used for rations for SRT’s rhino monitoring teams, with the rest being put towards the cost of a new vehicle, (together with income from selling off one of SRT’s older Landcruisers), to supply and redeploy monitoring teams. €2,000 from Zoo Krefeld will also go to this new vehicle purchase. Another $8,370 from our own core funds will pay for more rations. €2,000 from Rhinos energy will help pay informers for intelligence that leads to arrests of poachers. And US Fish and Wildlife Service made grants of $10,000 for yet more rations; $41,200 for the salaries of Principal Field Officer 2 and Maigoha trackers, and $5,500 towards vehicle running costs.

We sent £35,195 to the International Rhino Foundation, one of the Alliance Partners of the Sumatran Rhino Rescue Project. This was made up of the third of four instalments of $25,000 from our own core funds (our thanks to all our supporters who give the unrestricted donations that made this commitment possible), and an instalment of €18,900 from Wilhelma Zoo Stuttgart; both Save the Rhino and Wilhelma Zoo are donating to the Project at Strategic Partner level.

uMkhuze Game Reserve in South Africa received £60,432, thanks to a grant of $14,480 from Anna Merz Rhino Trust 160 sets of camouflage overalls for rangers, and $64,500 from USFWS to pay for solar systems to provide off-grid power at nine ranger outposts. This will mean that the rangers have light in the evenings, can charge their cellphones and radios, and can run freezers, thus allowing higher-quality rations while on extended deployment.

Finally, the ForRangers initiative enabled a grant of $10,000 to Gashaka Gumti National Park in Nigeria, to be put towards the purchase of digital radios for the Park’s rangers.

We sent out a total of £126,550 in grants as follows:

£680 to the Editor of Pachyderm, the Journal of the African and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups and the African Elephant Specialist Group, to cover the final costs of Issue 60, thanks to a donation from the African Fund for Endangered Wildlife.

£7,199 for the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries’ Administrator role. $9,097 of this ($6,300 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation, and $2,797 from our own core funds) was to cover John Gitonga’s salary and medical / accommodation / travel / leave allowances etc., while the remaining $351 from the Bently Foundation covered hotel nights in Nairobi needed prier to the Laikipia rhino range expansion workshop held in November 2019.

We made a number of grants from funds raised by the ForRangers initiative and by the runners who took part in the second ForRangers Ultra, held in September 2019. $10,000 went to the James Ashe Anti-venom Trust (aka Bio-Ken) for anti-venom (pays for 46 vials, which it is estimated will save the lives of 10-15 people, depending on the bite) and to improve the mambas’ cages (extra shade and a new roof) at the snake farm. £7,849 was awarded to Lolldaiga Hills in Laikipia to support ranger welfare (health, living conditions and equipment). £7,620 went to Loisaba Conservancy, to construct a health clinic consultation / treatment room in order to provide the infrastructure to address the medical needs of rangers, and to purchase three eco-jikos (fuel-efficient wood-burning stoves) for Loisaba’s security patrol stations, in order to provide a sustainable means of cooking at the ranger posts. Finally, £7,856 was sent to Ole Naishu for repairs to ranger accommodation and for new uniforms.

Funds raised by the ForRangers Ultra 2019 runners enabled a grant of £23,600 to Borana Conservancy, to buy new uniforms for Borana’s rhino monitors. A further £1,275 paid for a new prosthetic leg for Moses Kasaine. Moses is a Borana Ranch herder was bitten by a puff adder in June 2012 whilst out grazing cattle. Following a month in hospital he was released, but since then he has spent many months in hospital due to the permanent damage sustained to his leg. After experiencing continuous pain and multiple doctor’s appointments, Moses was referred from the Cottage Hospital in Nanyuki to Kijabe Hospital early in 2019 and the decision was made to operate and amputate the foot above the ankle. Moses was fitted with a prosthetic leg and given physiotherapy support to enable to continue his day-to-day life, and he is now back at Borana, working in the radio operations room.

Rangers from Gonarezhou Conservation Trust (GCT) in Zimbabwe took part in Save the Rhino’s team for the 2019 London Marathon. With the £2,605.82 raised in excess of the minimum required by Save the Rhino, GCT is upgrading the ranger training facilities. This is a specific training camp that all Gonarezhou rangers routinely visit for 2 x 10-day periods / year to upgrade their skills and refresh their motivation. With new recruits joining Gonarezhou in 2020 as part of the rhino reintroduction preparation, these facilities will serve a very important function as a base where rangers can be appropriately trained and motivated for their upcoming service to safeguard Gonarezhou’s wildlife.

We awarded £3,553.08 to the Kenya Wildlife Service to pay for 24 x Bushnell Core No Glow camera traps, plus metal cases, SD cards and smart chargers, for 12 national parks in Kenya, to improve rhino monitoring at those sites. Having up-to-date, accurate rhino sightings is an essential part of the management information required in order to make decisions about translocations in or out of any rhino population.

Thanks to a legacy from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust, we gave £2,372.11 to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism to pay for vehicle repairs and spare parts, and for new sets of tyres for rhino recovery vehicles. We also awarded a total of £12,229.55 to the Ministry, thanks to a 3-year grant from The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, which paid for repairs to the Ministry’s helicopter (labour and spare parts), for veterinary drugs, for vehicle repairs, and for a consultant (Martina Kusters) to do SMART data applications in Etosha National Park.

We sent £3,541.51 to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, to pay for 5 cameras, and 8 camera bags and SanDisk memory cards for the expanded rhino monitoring team in North Luangwa, thanks to donations by Peter & Birgit Lawrence and other misc. donors, and for law enforcement equipment from a larger grant from the Wildcat Foundation.

Wildcat Foundation funds also enabled a grant of$1,946 for anti-poaching operations by the Nsumbu-Tanganyika Conservation Project in Zambia, which may one day be a black rhino reintroduction site.

Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya is spending £23,603.46 (its share of the For Rangers Ultra 2019 income) on one or two canteens designated specifically for Ol Jogi’s National Police Reservists, so that they don’t have to worry about cooking immediately before or after deployment.

Finally, we paid a deposit of $11,085.71 from a grant from the US Government’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, to secure the venue for a workshop in Lusaka, scheduled for May 2020, for the next working dogs workshop.

Our thanks to everyone who made these grants possible.

We sent out a total of £254,879 in grants as follows:

$5,820 to the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries for intelligence and investigations work by 51 Degrees Ltd, thanks to a grant from Bently Foundation.

A total of £5,291, thanks to another grant from Bently Foundation, towards the costs of the Laikipia rhino range expansion workshop, held at Mpala Research Centre in November 2019. This covered the facilitators’ fees and national and international transport costs.

Sadly, we had to pay £2,191 from ForRangers’ funds, to issue court proceedings against an international freight company, which has failed to deliver gym equipment intended for rangers at Lew Wildlife, Borana and Ol Jogi Conservancies, after more than a year. It is our sincere hope that this action prompts a positive response, which previous warning letters have so far failed to achieve.

We were delighted to be able to send a fantastic total of £25,000 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park to support its aerial surveillance operations, for both rhino monitoring and anti-poaching purposes. This was made possible by the Zoological Society of East Anglia (Banham Zoo and Africa Alive!), which celebrated its 50th birthday this year, and which awarded £25,000 to giraffe conservation and £25,000 to rhino conservation to mark this special anniversary. Our very grateful thanks to ZSEA’s staff, board and visitors, who enabled such a fantastic donation.

Thanks to a legacy from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust, we were able to send £10,693 to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia for anti-poaching support in rhino custodian properties. $8,258 paid for the demolition and construction of a new strongroom for rhino horns; a further $4,381 bought rhino immobilisation drugs for dehorning operations; and $1,073 paid for two  solar panels, charge regulators and 14 V-belts for the LoRaWAN in Nyae Nyae Conservancy.

We made grants of a further £3,644 from the 2-year grant from The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge to the Ministry’s project in Etosha National Park. $1,887 paid for repairs to the helicopter (labour and spare parts); and $2,775 paid a consultant (Martina Kusters) to carry out SMART data applications and analysis during October 2019.

Thanks to a major two-year grant from the Wildcat Foundation for the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, we gave out a total of £173,783, to pay for two new vehicles (a Toyota Landcruiser 6-seater hard-top and a Toyota Landcruiser single-cab pick-up) and for various items of law-enforcement equipment.

Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia has experienced zero rhino poaching since August 2017 and we hope this record will continue. We advanced $34,000 from the latest USFWS grant that is due to arrive shortly, to help pay for salaries (Principal Field Officer 2 and trackers at Maigoha), rations, and vehicle running costs; £1,906 from West Midland Safari and Leisure Park for vehicle running costs and rations; and another £1,418 received in miscellaneous restricted donations for running costs associated with patrols in the Kunene landscape.

As ever, our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

We sent out a total of £94,952 in grants as follows:

£9,154 for Issue 60 of Pachyderm, the journal of the African and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups and African Elephant Specialist Group. This was made up of $4,982 from Save the Elephants, $1,315 from the International Rhino Foundation, £1,000 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust and £3,166 from the African Fund for Endangered Wildlife.

A total of £3,548, thanks to a grant from Bently Foundation, to cover the costs of a workshop looking at the possibility of rhino range expansion in Laikipia, Kenya, to pay the balance of the costs of board and accommodation for workshop participants, and for minibus transport between Nairobi and Mpala return for attendees.

We sent €4,000 to Education for Nature-Vietnam, thanks to a grant from long-standing zoo partner, Zoo de la Barben, for behaviour-change campaigns via social media messaging, to try to reduce the demand for illegal rhino horn in Vietnam.

Thanks to our donors who’ve given us so much unrestricted funding this year, we were able to award £20,000 from our core funds to WWF-SA / WWF-BRREP to help pay for translocation costs of moving 17 Diceros bicornis minor from South Africa to Malawi, to supplement the black rhino population in Liwonde National Park and increase its genetic diversity.

We sent $770 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, to pay for a portable generator for rhino dehorning operations to deter poaching. Such preventative measures have seen a decrease in the number of rhino poaching incidents in the country during 2019 as compared to 2018.

We sent a total of £17,581 to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism for its project in Etosha National Park, thanks to a 2-year grant from The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge. This paid for: two kennels (1 medium, 1 large) for the canine unit in Etosha NP; a steel roof structure and electricals for the canine unit; veterinary drugs for rhino immobilisations; batteries and chargers; repairs (spares and labour) to the Ministry’s helicopter; solar pumps and accessories to rehabilitate waterholes in the Park; and for SMART data analysis of rhino sighting and poaching incidents.

We sent $21,896 from USFWS to help cover the operating costs of Rafiki wa Faru, the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary’s conservation education programme that targets the 14 schools surrounding Mkomazi National Park in Tanzania.

Similarly, we sent $25,000 from the Disney Conservation Fund to Lolesha Luangwa, the conservation education programme in North Luangwa National Park in Zambia, to help cover its operating costs in the period July 2019-June 2020.

Finally, we sent a small grant of £92 to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia, to pay flight costs for a member of staff from YABI, the Indonesian Rhino Foundation, to attend a fundraising event in Singapore.

As always, our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

We sent out a total of £282,713 in grants as follows:

£29,750 to the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group, to pay for the core work by the Secretariat, thanks to grants of $11,255 from our own core funds; $17,108 from USFWS; $5,153 from our sister organization SRI Inc.; and $3,222 from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Ltd. The AfRSG’s Vision is: Thriving wild African rhinos valued by people and contributing to their well-being; Mission: The AfRSG guides and facilitates the conservation of viable African rhino populations across their natural range. Its Objectives are: To establish and enhance healthy and persistent rhino populations through advising and facilitating the efficient protection and dynamic biological management of African rhinos within their natural range; To foster multiple values of rhinos for all peoples’ well-being through promoting sustainable conservation; To facilitate research, collate information and report on the status of African rhinos to the IUCN and other parties; To support targeted communication to a wide range of stakeholders; To ensure effective leadership through capacity building and mentorship of the next generation of rhino conservationists; To promote sustainable finance and good governance for African rhino conservation; and To manage, monitor, and evaluate the Group via effective, efficient, and transparent governance.

We paid £3,498 for flights for a number of AfRSG members to attend a workshop being held in Kenya in November 2019, to examine the possibilities for rhino range expansion in Laikipia, to meet the country’s need for additional suitable, secure habitat. Our thanks to Bently Foundation, which is funding and participating in the workshop.

We are grateful to CHK Foundation for its grant of £12,000 for Borana Conservancy’s mobile health clinic in Laikipia, Kenya. Providing incentives for neighbouring communities to benefit from wildlife conservation activities is key to gaining goodwill and support.

We awarded £4,735 to the Environmental Investigation Agency, for one of its researchers to attend meetings in China and Hungary to look at rhino and tiger captive breeding facilities and issues arising, and participate in discussions about tackling illegal wildlife trafficking.

Also from core funds, we paid for flights for two Kenyan vets (Drs Matthew Mutinda and Edward Kamau Kariuki) to attend a chemical immobilisation and field practice course in Johannesburg, South Africa, in order to build veterinary capacity within Kenya.

We spent $258 from core funds on local transport for a canine handler team from the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia to visit Kruger National Park and the South African Wildlife College’s to see their use of tracking and detecting dogs.

Year two of a grant from the Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge enabled us to pay for a number of items on behalf of the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia’s work in Etosha National Park: $4,012 for predator collars; $3,876 for helicopter maintenance (spare parts and labour costs); and $2,751 for consultant fees for work on SMART data entry and analysis.

Lolesha Luangwa, the black rhino-focused conservation education programme that reaches schools bordering North Luangwa National Park in Zambia, received $4,245 from our own core funds and another $22,450 from USFWS for operating costs July 2019-June 2020.

We sent $82,181 from Wildcat Foundation to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia for law enforcement equipment (night-vision / thermal-imaging equipment, radios, handcuffs and batons etc.)

Nsumbu Tanganyika Conservation Project in northern Zambia is another programme run in a partnership between the Frankfurt Zoological Society (FZS) and the Department of National Parks and Wildlife. NTCP hopes to receive rhinos at some point in the future and is busy preparing the Park’s infrastructure and ranger force for an increased emphasis on endangered species. A total of $104,250 from the Wildcat Foundation was awarded for ranger equipment.

Finally, we sent a total of £49,928 to Ol Jogi Conservancy, thanks to several very generous donations by individuals. Ed Calkins and Linda Sonders donated $15,000, which is being spent as follows: $2,870 on a new cheetah enclosure for the orphaned cub that has been hand-reared prior to re-release; $1,512 for seven celebratory Rhino Dinners, when staff name new rhino calves; $6,905 for intelligence gathering and analysis, and $3,713 towards an elephant exclusion zone around the big dam while research is done on competition for browse between species. Another $45,217 from a total grant of $45,517 from Kristen Garlinghouse is paying for a high-tech digital X-ray machine for Ol Jogi’s veterinary laboratory. And we gave £1,097 from our own core funds to pay the flight costs for veterinarians Dave Cooper and Johan Steyl, both from South Africa, to attend a veterinary workshop held in October at Ol Jogi, organised in conjunction with the Smithsonian Institute.

Our thanks, as always, to our wonderful donors who make these grants possible.

We sent out a total of £87,438 in grants as follows:

£2,559 from a grant from the Bently Foundation was used to support the costs of a workshop being held in Laikipia this November, which will look at rhino range expansion to help Kenya deliver its national target of 2,000 black rhinos. The grant will pay for flights for international delegates, as well as workshop accommodation and facilitation costs, and cleaning up data from 11 rhino sites in Kenya in order to assist meta-population planning.

Another programme we support via the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya is the Emergency Fund for black rhino, which pays 50% of veterinarian and boma-care costs for any black rhino needing emergency treatment, whether due to a poaching incident or intra-species fighting. £4,974 helped cover expenditure during the 12-month period April 2018 to March 2019. Our thanks to Rhino’s energy for its grant of €2,000, the Betty Lawes Foundation for its grant of £1,750, and Greater Good for its grant of $1,596; the remainder came from core funds.

Our very grateful thanks to Stichting Wildlife for its grant of €10,000, which went to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, for rhino management and monitoring in Bubye Valley Conservancy, as well as preliminary work in Gonarezhou National Park for the planned introduction of rhinos there in 2020.

We sent £3,586 to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, which has launched a canine unit with funding from USFWS and other donors. $4,000 from USFWS’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund and the rest from our core funds paid for six people from MET’s dog-handler unit to visit the South African Wildlife College and Kruger National Park, to see how colleagues there train and manage their tracker and detection dogs. Some of the Namibians had never left the country before or been on an aeroplane before, and the exposure visit boosted not only knowledge but morale.

We sent a second grant of $1,000 from core funds to support a search for any Northern white rhinos left in an undisclosed location in north Africa.

We awarded £15,178 to Ol Jogi in Kenya, home to populations of white and black rhino. €8,469 euros from Erlebnis Zoo Hannover will be spent on animal weighing scales, a rhino prodder, transmitter drill, sustainable power for the vet clinic and CCTVs for Ol Jogi’s wildlife corridors; $1,000 from The Barker Welfare Foundation will support Ol Jogi’s hand-reared black rhinos; and $8,000 from Axel Vervoordt USA, LLC, will be used to create a library for Ol Jogi’s schools’ programme.

Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, a programme we’ve supported since our inception 25 years ago, received £23,585 for its informer programme, which has led to significant arrests of would-be rhino poachers, including apprehensions before an incident took place. There has been no rhino poaching in the Kunene Region since August 2017, and tribute to the intelligence network’s success. Our thanks to Michelle Hincks, Ness Buxton and Al Hearn, whose Desert Heart party raised funds for SRT and to other misc. donors for their gifts, to which we added £15,522 from our own core funds.

We sent a lovely £6,970 to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia, thanks to grants of £5,000 from the Simon Gibson Charitable Trust and £1,901 from West Midland Safari and Leisure Park, as well as other misc. donations.

Finally, we sent £20,581 to uMkhuze Game Reserve in South Africa, for the upgrade of the Forward Operations Centre, thanks to a grant of $25,000 from the Bently Foundation.

Our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

We sent out a total of £167,218 in grants as follows:

A total of £11,250 to Borana Conservancy in Kenya, for ranger training. £2,000 came from the Mackintosh Foundation, $1,000 and £378 from misc. donations, and a further $10,000 from the net profit from the 2018 For Rangers Ultra. Borana, together with neighbouring Lewa Wildlife and Ol Jogi Conservancies, employs 51 Degrees Ltd to deliver an annual programme of basic, refresher and advanced training courses that each have intakes from all three conservancies, to maintain standards, encourage healthy competition between each conservancies’ rangers and build the trust so necessary for combined reactive responses.

We sent £1,073 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, thanks to misc. donations via our website, which is being put towards complete sets of camping equipment so that the Park’s rangers can stay out on extended patrol for days at a time. Each set should last three years and costs in the region of $675: one-man tent; 75-litre backpack; bivvie / poncho; sleeping bag and liner; roll-up mattress; 2-litre water bottles; water purification tablets; first aid kit; mess kit; binoculars; rifle-cleaning kit; battery charging pack; cooking stove and butane fuel; and a compass.

We sent £110 from misc. donations to the International Rhino Foundation (IRF) for the Indian Rhino Vision 2020 programme in Assam, India.

A total of £991 from misc. donations went to the IRF for the Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area in Indonesia, where the priorities are to improve the habitat by removing the Arenga palm, an invasive species that is reducing the rhinos’ food sources, to document the rhinos’ distribution and population performance via the use of camera traps, and to maintain patrols to deter poachers.

We awarded €1,125 euros to the Kenya Wildlife Service for Lake Nakuru National Park, where there are populations of black and white rhinos. Another charity, called Rhino Rescue Trust, which had long supported rhino protection efforts in Lake Nakuru, closed down last year and transferred all its remaining assets, some £20,000, to Save the Rhino; this grant was a small tribute to RRT’s history.

A series of grants went to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, where four concurrent grants are running. $2,383 from core funds paid the Windhoek Veterinary Clinic for misc. veterinary supplies for the canine unit that was launched in 2018. In the first year of its operation, the canine unit was responsible for 53 arrests and seizures. $7,666 from USFWS paid for helicopter hire for the country’s annual and ongoing dehorning programme, which aims to reduce the rewards available from rhino poaching. Another £6,715 from our own core funds also supported this programme, paying for helicopter hire and fixed-wing fuel, for a rope and sling used to transport anaesthetised rhino short distances, when thick bush prevents loading them into crates and moving them by truck, for routine repairs to the Rhino Recovery Vehicle and to one of the generators used by the vet, and for a winch for one of the rhino trailers, that can tow a crate behind a 4WD vehicle. A project in Etosha National Park funded by The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge received a total of £25,794: $4,747 for data modelling of the Park’s rhino populations using SMART; $15,797 for helicopter maintenance, $2,615 towards the construction of kennels for the canine unit in Etosha NP; $7,470 for tags and tracking fees for selected species that act as indicators of poaching or human-related disturbance; and $474 for vehicle repairs. Finally, we sent £61,296 to another MET project involving the use of satellite collars and/or RFID tags to monitor rhino populations in three national parks: $70,967 came from a USFWS grant and the other £4,418 from our own core funds.

Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya benefited from two grants this month. The first, of €10,000 from Zoo-Berlin and Tierpark Berlin, paid for: a microscope with camera and screen for the veterinary clinic through which Ol Jogi can do much more than its previous diagnostic capability as well as train remotely etc.; Police Certification of the K9 unit so that arrests made by the National Police Reserves  as a result of the dogs are largely considered admissible in Kenya Courts in order to improve conviction rates; and energizer(s) and fencing materials to improve fence-line voltage in order to mitigate consistent fence breakages by elephants that are compromising general security. We also sent £5,458 from funds raised by the For Rangers initiative, to pay for uniforms (shirts, trousers, jumpers, jackets, hats and socks) for Ol Jogi’s 32 armed response rangers.

We sent £5,747 for the Rhino Protection Unit programme in Sumatra, Indonesia, thanks to misc. donations, an anonymous donation and £899 raised by Catherine Aspert, to pay for the Unit’s salaries, uniforms and rations. Our focus is on Way Kambas National Park, where it is believed that there are between c. 20 and 35 Sumatran rhinos surviving.

Way Kambas National Park is home to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, which received a total of £21,550 this month: the second $25,000 instalment from our $100,000 commitment to the Sumatran Rhino Rescue Project is helping pay for the expansion of the SRS, and a further £1,504 for the Sanctuary’s annual operating costs.

Finally, we sent a total of £9,087 to uMkhuze Game Reserve in South Africa, thanks to misc. donations of £1,856 and $9,000 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation, which is being used to help pay for LoRaWAN devices that will be implanted in the horns of rhinos being translocated into the Reserve in September, and issued to all rangers for their personal protection, in that the LoRaWAN devices provide constant data updates that inform the Forward Operations Centre of ranger and vehicle locations.

We sent out a total of £423,507 in grants as follows:

£27,842 to renew the life insurance policy for rangers working at a number of conservancies in Kenya, thanks to the fundraising efforts of Sam Taylor and Pete Newland of the For Rangers initiative (Sam summited Mt Everest last month) and to a grant from the Tristan Voorspuy Charitable Trust. The scheme paid out in the last year for a ranger who broke his leg while on duty and covered his hospital fees and physio rehabilitation.

We sent a total of £12,907 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, to help pay for complete sets of camping equipment for the Park’s 120 rangers, thanks to grants of €400 from Zoo Zlin and €2,500 from Parc de Lunaret – Zoo de Montpellier, £6,580 from Colchester Zoo Action for the Wild, and other misc. donations, including £640 raised by Ursula Fricke. The continued poaching pressure in HiP means that rangers need to be deployed on extended multi-night patrols.

The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge enabled a grant of $4,219 to pay for immobilization drugs for rhino management operations in Etosha National Park in Namibia.

We sent all the remaining funds received from the Wildcat Foundation – $439,583 – to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia. This grant has paid for ranger salaries, bonuses and incentives, specialist and in-service training, and vehicle running costs.

A final $2,228 from the grant from Working Dogs for Conservation went to pay for the accommodation and conference fee costs associated with the working dogs workshop, held in May 2019 in Nairobi.

Finally, we sent $39,002 from Wilhelma Zoo Stuttgart, our fellow Strategic Partner in the Sumatran Rhino Rescue Project, to Indonesia, to pay for the redevelopment of the Visitor Center in the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas National Park. This was the first instalment of a $100,000 commitment, and we are deeply grateful to Wilhelma Zoo for its support.

As always, we are deeply grateful to all our donors who have made these grants possible.

We sent out £14,713 in grants as follows:

£12 in miscellaneous merchandise was donated to Lewa Wildlife Conservancy during our Partnership Manager Michaela Butorova’s visit in May 2019.

We gave £1,400 from core funds to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, to pay for the entry of rhino monitoring data from October 2018 to April 2019 inclusive in Lowveld Rhino Trust’s database.

The Royal Foundation of The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s grant for Etosha National Park in Namibia, run by the Ministry of Environment and Tourism, enabled us to make a part-payment of $5,733 for Etosha’s canine unit at the Anti-Poaching Unit’s camp in the Park.

£11 in miscellaneous merchandise was donated to Ol Jogi Conservancy during our Partnership Manager Michaela Butorova’s visit in May 2019.

Finally, we spent £8,813 on the Working Dogs Workshop held in May 19 in Nairobi, and an associated visit by some of the workshop participants to Ol Jogi and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies. $9,914 of this came from the grant from Working Dogs for Conservation; the other £1,104 came from our own core funds.

Thank you to all our lovely donors!