A ranger smiles with his dog. A ranger smiles with his dog.

Thank you for making our grants possible!

Here are the grants that Save the Rhino has recently made.

Click on the sections below to see the grants we’ve sent so far this year.

More information on how we spend money can be found in our Audited Accounts on the Charity Commission’s website and Impact reports (latest copy viewable here).

If you’d like to understand more about our funding priorities, take a look at our grant-making policy. Further guidelines on applying for a grant can be found here.

Gashaka Gumti National Park, Nigeria

  • $10,000 from funds raised by the For Rangers initiative to Gashaka Gumti National Park in Nigeria, pay for Iridium satellite handsets, antennae etc. to improve communications in the Park
  • £5 from core funds for transfer fees

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • $3,573 from a multi-year grant from the Wildcat Foundation paid for anti-poaching operations and equipment by and for North Luangwa National Park’s rangers
  • £5 from core funds for transfer fees
  • $700,000 from the Wildcat Foundation for law-enforcement equipment and anti-poaching operations, ranger salaries, bonuses and incentives, specialist and in-service training and vehicle running costs for North Luangwa National Park’s rangers

Nsumbu Tanganyika Conservation Project, Zambia

  • $2,903 from the Wildcat Foundation went to NTCP in Zambia for anti-poaching operations. NTCP Zambia is another programme run in a partnership between the Frankfurt Zoological Society (FZS) and the Department of National Parks and Wildlife. NTCP hopes to receive rhinos at some point in the future, and is busy preparing the Park’s infrastructure and ranger force for an increased emphasis on endangered species

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • $10,730 from For Rangers’ restricted funds to pay for rangers’ wages ($6,330) and vehicle fuel and maintenance ($4,400) at Enonkishu Conservancy in the Masai Mara

Big Life Foundation, Kenya

  • $35,000 from the Bently Foundation in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, to help cover Core Critical Operations Costs: the salaries of security staff and associated staff costs, vehicle fuel and maintenance costs for patrol purposes, flying time (helicopter and fixed-wing, as a deterrent to incursions and reaction to any threats), and other essential costs, including: canine units; intelligence gathering and analysis; a proportion of management staff (reduced) salaries; electricity / power, water, fence and road maintenance for security purposes; communications (again security-related) and any emergency vet interventions required. All these security-related activities must continue, if the conservancies and the wildlife they nurture are to survive the immediate crisis
  • $45,000 from the Bently Foundation / For Rangers / WCN Rhino Recovery Fund for Core Critical Operations Costs

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • $55,000 from the Bently Foundation in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, to help cover Core Critical Operations Costs (as for Big Life Foundation)
  • $50,000 from Save the Rhino International Inc. for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $225,000 from For Rangers for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $82,500 from the Bently Foundation / For Rangers / WCN Rhino Recovery Fund for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $5,000 from Taliaferro Family Fund for general Conservancy operating costs
  • $10,000 from Ingemar Goksøyr and Myfrid Oygard for a rhino naming opportunity and to help pay for Conservancy running costs
  • £1,199 received in misc. restricted donations via our website, to help cover Borana’s ongoing operating costs
  • £20,000 from the Rothes Charitable Trust to help Borana’s general operating costs. Income from the lodge has completed disappeared due to the Covid-19-imposed restrictions on international flights

Il Ngwesi Community Conservancy, Kenya

  • $10,000 from the Bently Foundation in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, to help cover Core Critical Operations Costs (as for Big Life Foundation)
  • $13,000 from the Bently Foundation / For Rangers / WCN Rhino Recovery Fund for Core Critical Operations Costs

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $40,000 from the Bently Foundation in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, to help cover Core Critical Operations Costs (as for Big Life Foundation)
  • $82,500 from the Bently Foundation / For Rangers / WCN Rhino Recovery Fund for Core Critical Operations Costs

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $55,000 from the Bently Foundation in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, to help cover Core Critical Operations Costs (as for Big Life Foundation)
  • $50,000 from Save the Rhino International Inc. for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $125,000 from For Rangers for Core Critical Operations Costs
  • $82,500 from the Bently Foundation / For Rangers / WCN Rhino Recovery Fund for Core Critical Operations Costs

Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya

  • $40,000 from the Bently Foundation in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, to help cover Core Critical Operations Costs (as for Big Life Foundation)
  • $82,500 from the Bently Foundation / For Rangers / WCN Rhino Recovery Fund for Core Critical Operations Costs

Sera Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $15,000 from the Bently Foundation in response to the Covid-19 pandemic, to help cover Core Critical Operations Costs (as for Big Life Foundation)
  • $12,000 from the Bently Foundation / For Rangers / WCN Rhino Recovery Fund for Core Critical Operations Costs

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • $2,680 from core funds and $6,154 from US Fish & Wildlife Service to procure additional dogs for Namibia’s canine unit, which has proved so successful in deployment in Etosha NP and elsewhere in the country
  • $589 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust for repairs to the reciprocal saw and new blades for rhino dehorning operations on custodian properties
  • $729 from core funds to pay for a new safe in which to store horns removed in dehorning exercise, and $310 from core funds to pay for a fridge in which to store genetic samples taken during immobilizations
  • $3,062, $1,427 and $1,403 from core funds to pay for veterinary drugs and consumables used during rhino immobilization operations, whether to ear-notch, dehorn, or translocate animals away from rhino-poaching hotspots; and another $1,427 from core funds to pay for veterinary / darting equipment
  • $1,489 from core funds to pay for new wheels for the trailers used to hold black rhino crates during translocations and $224 from core funds to pay for ties to fix the black rhino crates to their trailers
  • $1,903 from USFWS to pay for new dart gun and sights, $1,527 to pay for more veterinary / darting equipment, and $24,746 to pay for helicopter hours for annual dehorning operations
  • $310 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust to pay for paintballs, used to mark rhinos during immobilization operations so that they are not inadvertently re-darted. The paint is water-soluble and non-toxic, and rubs off after a week of dust or mud wallows

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • £5,168 received in misc. donations and from Rhino Covid-19 Crisis Appeal during June 2020, to be used as needed. Covid-19 has hit HiP hard, with no income from Park entry fees or tourism lodges, and yet many additional items of Personal Protective Equipment were needed that were not in original Park budgets
  • €2,500 from Parc de Lunaret – Zoo de Montpellier, a long-standing supporter of HiP, to be used to help buy misc. items of law-enforcement equipment
  • $16,136 from US Fish & Wildlife Service to pay for new vehicle tyres, and a further $3,185 from USFWS for aerial surveillance over HiP. The Savannah S light sport aircraft is used to help spot animals for the rhino trackers, to monitor the progress of any wildfires, to look for predators that may have strayed out of the Park, and to assist during live operations to apprehend poachers April 2020-March 2021 USFWS

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • €25,000 from WILDLANDS Nature and Education Fund (also known as Zoo Emmen) helped pay for aircraft hangar construction, pilot training for two pilots to obtain their light sports aircraft licences and accommodation while training, a drone kit, an electric vehicle to monitor the Reserve’s fence-line, binoculars for the field rangers and tyres for three law-enforcement vehicles. This is the first half of a total €50,000 donation by WILDLANDS Nature and Education Fund for uMkhuze

Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area, Indonesia

  • $50,000 from Save the Rhino International Inc. thanks to a major unrestricted donation from an anonymous donor, which will be used to help pay for the Rhino Protection Unit programme in Ujung Kulon NP, home to the world’s only population of Javan Rhinos. The RPUs are on patrol for c. 15 consecutive days, looking for signs of rhino and other large megafauna, as well as acting upon any illegal activities, such as logging or snares. Each RPU comprises one member of National Parks staff, who is armed; the other three are from YABI, or Yayasan Badak Indonesia (the Indonesian Rhino Foundation)
  • £172 received in misc. donations for Arenga palm eradication un Ujung Kulon NP. With only one site currently available for Javan rhinos, ensuring that more of the Park has suitable fodder plants for the rhinos is the simplest way of expanding suitable habitat. Arenga palm is an invasive species that dominates undergrowth unless checked
  • £166 received in misc. donations via our website for ongoing rhino monitoring by the Rhino Protection Units in Ujung Kulon NP

Rhino Protection Unit programme, Indonesia

  • £5,000 from the Simon Gibson Charitable Trust helped cover the operating costs of the RPUs working in Way Kambas NP in south-eastern Sumatra
  • £2,500 from David Williamson and Sue Ripley, together with another £2,086 and £405 received in misc. donations in response to our Rhino Covid-19 crisis appeal held during July 2020, to help pay for the cost of the RPU programme in Way Kambas NP
  • £1,060 from restricted misc. dons for the Way Kambas reforestation project ($1,000 covers the cost of replanting one acre of trees)
  • £4,500 received as an anonymous donation from a company helped cover the RPUs’ salaries and rations

Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, Indonesia

  • $25,000 (the fourth and last instalment of the $100,000 commitment from our core funds) for the Sumatran Rhino Rescue Project
  • $20,000 (the third instalment of a $100,000 commitment ) from Wilhelma Zoo Stuttgart for the Sumatran Rhino Rescue Project
  • £384 from misc. restricted donations for general Sanctuary running costs
  • Another £64 received in misc. donations via our website for general Sanctuary running costs

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • $5,297 paid from Bently Foundation funds and $1,703 from core funds paid for Conservation Alpha to support the Kenya Wildlife Service and the APLRS to clean-up historical rhino-sighting data from rhino sites throughout Kenya. A new reporting tool built by Conservation Alpha will facilitate management decisions regarding the country’s meta-population
  • £1,159 received in misc. restricted donations and £2,250 from the Betty Lawes Foundation went to cover 50% of costs incurred by APLRS Members for veterinary interventions needed for black rhinos during the period April 2019 to March 2020
  • $3,000 from an anonymous donor to the For Rangers initiative paid for lion collars for a project being coordinated by Sosian Ranch. It is hoped that better understanding of the pride’s movements will reduce predator-livestock conflict

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $50,000 from an anonymous donor to Save the Rhino International Inc. was used to buy a JCB backhoe loader, to assist with digging trenches to lay new pipes for water reticulation in the Pyramid section of the Conservancy
  • €7,500 from Stichting Wildlife paid for SMART devices and for the installation of further cameras for the CCTV remote camera system along the Ol Jogi’s wildlife corridors that allow animals to cross from one part of the Conservancy to others

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • £4,686 and £27,323 from The Royal Foundation of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge to pay for helicopter hours – the purchase of fuel and its transport to Okaukuejo, and for helicopter hire in order to carry out a block count, i.e. get an up-to-date census of white and black rhino numbers, in Etosha NP. A further £1,770 from the Royal Foundation paid for Ministry staff’s subsistence costs while in the field
  • $4,470 from core funds, and $33,510 plus $15,784 plus $9,304 from US Fish & Wildlife Service paid for GPS satellite and LoRa WAN rhino-tracking to aid rhino monitoring throughout the country, particularly for animals that were retrieved from outside Etosha NP or translocated to new areas
  • $12,057 from USFWS funds paid for predictive-modelling consultant to map poaching hotspots and inform anti-poaching interventions. $1,198 from USFWS funds paid for the hosting of Shiny app data to inform the modelling
  • $7,192 from USFWS paid for a data consultant to analyse SMART and Cybertracker data for the period April-June 2020 inclusive

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • $30,000 from the Ceiley Foundation was allocated as follows: $10,189 Ugab team salaries, $10,286 for vehicle fuel and maintenance, $5,600 for misc. equipment purchase and repair, and $3,925 for Ugab team base expenses, for SRT’s financial year 2019-20
  • £584 from core funds helped cover vehicle running costs, rations and field day bonuses for the staff
  • $8,900 from For Rangers’ restricted funds went towards for vehicle fuel and maintenance for SRT’s tracker patrols
  • £7,221 from misc. res dons and our Rhino Covid-19 Crisis appeal during June 2020, together with £6,095 donated by Vanessa Buxton and £10,000 raised by Berry White via a virtual summer solstice festival, helped pay for vehicle running costs, rations and field day bonuses for the staff
  • £2,500 from David Williamson and Sue Ripley helped pay for general rhino monitoring costs: vehicle fuel and maintenance, rhino-sightings incentives and trackers’ rations. David and Sue had visited the Kunene Region in 1996, when they met Mike Hearn, after whom our paid Internship is named, and who had a memorable encounter with a rhino named Speedy
  • £629 received in misc. donations helped cover the costs of general rhino monitoring: vehicle fuel and maintenance, rhino-sightings incentives and trackers’ rations

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • $15,159 from US Fish & Wildlife Service will help to cover the cost of uMkhuze’s rhino monitor’s salary. Budget cuts at the managing agency, EKZNW, mean that this important post has to be funded by external donors. A much more detailed database is being built up of the Reserve’s white and black rhino populations as a result of this dedicated position

Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary Rhino, Tanzania

  • Several grants were sent to help pay for fuel and maintenance for water bowser, brush cutter etc. in order to keep the Sanctuary functioning in the 6-month period July-December 2020; Covid-19: $16,180 from core funds, $9,975 from Tusk Trust and $1,969 from Zoo Dvur Kralove

Lowveld Rhino Trust, Zimbabwe

  • $9,900 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation was sent to help cover salaries and vehicle running costs for the scout teams responsible for monitoring black and white rhinos in Bubye Valley Conservancy

Environmental Investigation Agency, UK

  • $29,750 from Save the Rhino International Inc. was awarded to the Environmental Investigation Agency for a project entitled “Strengthening legal and policy frameworks in China”. The EIA will advocate for the adoption of a new State Council order and/or amendments to China’s wildlife laws; to encourage and amplify diverse voices calling for an end to trade in threatened wildlife; and to undertake research and produce analysis to support policy recommendations

Indian Rhino Vision, 2020

  • $3,969 from Wilhelma Zoo Stuttgart to be used for the wildlife crime investigation and enforcement programme in Assam

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • $11,349 from For Rangers’ restricted funds to pay for rangers’ rations at Lewa, Borana, Ol Jogi, Ol Pejeta and Sosian Conservancies: tea, sugar, rice, maize meal flour, baking flour, cooking fat and soap
  • $9,270 from For Rangers’ restricted funds to pay for rations ($1,620), rebuilding Bingham camp after floods washed it away ($2,000), radio batteries ($150), solar power maintenance ($1,000) and communications (airtime and internet etc.) ($4,500) at Enonkishu Conservancy in the Masai Mara
  • $24,280 from For Rangers’ funds to pay for rangers’ salaries and rations, and then another $720 to pay for rations for Sosian Ranch’s rangers: tea, sugar, rice, maize meal flour, baking flour, cooking fat, beef mix and soap
  • $13,596 and another $13,681 from For Rangers’ restricted funds to pay for rangers’ rations at Lewa, Borana, Ol Jogi, Ol Pejeta and Sosian Conservancies as well as Loisaba, Il Ngwesi Community and Il Mamusi Conservancies and the Ngare Ndare Forest Trust : tea, sugar, rice, maize meal flour, baking flour, cooking fat and soap
  • $28,593 from For Rangers’ funds to pay for renewal of Viva365 life insurance policy for Kenyan rangers from 13 June 2020 to 12 June 2021
  • $7,323 from For Rangers’ funds to pay for rangers’ salaries, rations, training and radios at the Ngare Ndare Forest Trust
  • $1,371 from ForRangers’ to pay for rations for community conservancies in Laikipia, including Naibunga, Il Mamusi, Il Ngwesi and Ngare Ndare Forest Trust

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • $3,250 from core funds and $54,500 from US Fish & Wildlife Service to pay Invictus K9 for their instructors’ training of dog handlers
  • $54,550 from USFWS funds to pay Invictus K9 for instructors’ training of dog handlers

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • $11,100 from For Rangers’ restricted funds was use to buy rations for SRT’s trackers, who are out in the field for many days each month in an extremely remote and inhospitable environment

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • $500 from the Bernard F. and Alva B. Gimbel Foundation for camp maintenance
  • $22,647 from US Fish & Wildlife Service for ranger camp maintenance
  • $16,985 from USFWS for ration packs, used by Field Rangers when on extended (i.e. multi-day-night) patrols in remote parts of the Park
  • $12,739 from USFWS in July 20 for camouflage overalls for the Park’s Field Rangers
  • €10,000 from Réserve Africaine de Sigean and €3,000 from Safari de Peaugres; to be used to buy a quadbike and some law-enforcement / maintenance equipment, including rifle cleaning kits, oils and pepper spray, and to make repairs to vehicles, pumps, electricals etc.

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • $22,575 from US Fish & Wildlife Service was used to pay for four more solar power installations in ranger picket camps, which will provide light at night and power to charge cellphones and radios
  • USFWS
  • $9,200 from USFWS was used to buy uniforms for uMkhuze’s Field Rangers and Section Rangers
  • $17,693 from USFWS was allocated to ranger tactical training. Budgets have been severely cut at the managing agency, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, and financial problems have been exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic, so this funding for ranger training is particularly welcome
  • $9,383 from core funds went towards misc. camp equipment and for solar-power installation at rangers’ camps

Rhino Fund Uganda, Uganda

  • $10,000 from For Rangers’ restricted funds was awarded to RFU to help cover ranger salaries and rations at Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary, home to Uganda’s only breeding population of Southern white rhino. Covid-19 has seen all tourism to Ziwa cease, with consequent lack of income

Rhino Resource Center, UK

  • As in previous years, we awarded £1,000 from our core funds to the Rhino Resource Center, which is an invaluable online reference source for rhino conservationists, field practitioners and students alike. http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • £8,673 from Peter and Birgit Lawrence helped pay for improved ablutions and water provision (a soak-away extension, tank stand and solar-powered hot-water geyser) at the Rhino and Elephant Protection Unit base in North Luangwa NP, as well as fodder for one of the rhinos that needed boma care, ranger salaries etc.
  • £1,000 from core funds was sent as a reward for two of NLCP’s scouts, Paimolo and Cosmas, for exceptional dedication shown during an emergency rhino operation

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • €4,000 donated by long-time supporter Ales Weiner was used to help cover the salary of the APLRS Administrator, John Gitonga, for the period July 2020-June 2021. John is based in the Rhino Programme Coordinator’s office in the KWS headquarters in Nairobi, and works alongside the RPC to monitor and encourage the implementation of Kenya’s Black Rhino Action Plan

Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary, Tanzania

  • £11,761 from core funds and £260 received in miscellaneous restricted donations were used to pay for Dr Rob Brett and Dr Rob Small, both of Fauna and Flora International, to conduct a review of the Sanctuary’s black rhinos’ breeding performance and to make recommendations for the future management of Mkomazi, following the handover of the Sanctuary’s management from the George Adamson Wildlife Preservation Trust to the Tanzanian National Parks Authority. With the publication of a new national rhino strategy, it is excellent timing to be thinking about the role that Mkomazi can play in national meta-population management, as Tanzania’s third-largest black rhino population

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • $25,000 from the Disney Conservation Fund, the second instalment of a 2-year grant of $50,000, went to NLCP for Lolesha Luangwa, the conservation education programme that targets 21 schools in the Game Management Areas surrounding the Park. This is part of a “hearts and minds” approach, which builds knowledge, empathy and responsibility for the Park’s black rhino population, and which is partly responsible for NLCP’s zero-poaching record. This grant will help cover Lolesha Luangwa’s running costs for the period July 2020 to June 2021
  • $20,000 from For Rangers’ restricted funds was used to help pay salaries for the community scouts working in the Game Management Areas surrounding North Luangwa National Park. Covid-19 has meant that all trophy hunting in the GMAs has ceased and, with it, all income for the community scouts. NLCP has taken on the task of funding the salaries throughout the pandemic, to ensure that the scouts are not driven to poaching through loss of income

As always, our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.