Thank you for making our grants possible!

A ranger smiling. Rangers save rhinos each day.
Credit: Tristan Vince

Click on the sections below to see the grants we’ve sent so far this year (our financial year runs April 2024 – March 2025).

Further down, you’ll see all of the grants we sent between April 2023 and March 2024.

More information on how we spend money can be found in our Audited Accounts on the Charity Commission’s website and Impact reports (latest copy viewable here).

If you’d like to understand more about our funding priorities, take a look at our grant-making policy. Further guidelines on applying for a grant can be found here.

Grants 2024-2025

Ujung Kulon National Park, Indonesia

Way Kambas National Park, Indonesia

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya – For Rangers

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya – 51 Degrees Ltd

  • $1,819 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) via Project UPTICK paid the salary of 51 Degrees’ Intelligence Assistant for March 2024, who analyses intelligence and prepares reports for site managers

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • $2,675 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) via Project UPTICK paid for intelligence gathering & analysis during March 2024; $1,000 for the biannual site-visit and on-site training; and $4,408 for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during March 2024

Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya

  • $18,813.90 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) via Project UPTICK paid for ongoing IT support during March 2024 for KWS sites using EarthRanger: the KWS HQ in Nairobi, nine national parks (Tsavo West, Lake Nakuru, Aberdare, Meru, Ruma, Mt Kenya, Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary, Amboseli & Shimba Hills), and seven regional headquarters (Western, Mountain, Tsavo, Southern, Coastal, Central Rift (Lake Nakuru) & Eastern)

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $2,675 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) via Project UPTICK for intelligence gathering & analysis during March 2024

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $2,675 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) via Project UPTICK paid for intelligence gathering & analysis during March 2024; $1,000 for the biannual site-visit and on-site training; and $4,408 for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during March 2024

Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya

  • $2,675 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) via Project UPTICK for intelligence gathering & analysis during March 2024

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • £86.65, from the legacy from Ania Wanda Wasilewski, was used to pay Marey Upholstery for repairs to the canvas of the Rhino Recovery Vehicle’s canopy and to tents used during annual rhino operations
  • We sent several payments from Y3 of the 5-year USFWS grant: $12,716.29 to Namibia Helicopter Services for chopper hours during annual rhino operations; $1,648.17 (N$ 30,000) to advance funds to Piet Beytell, the National Rhino Coordinator, for fuel for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used during annual rhino dehorning operations; $27,248.84 to pay Namibia Helicopter Services for chopper hours during annual rhino operations; and $56.38 to cover subsistence and travel for Park Warden Natalie Barry during dehorning ops in March in Etosha NP

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • €4,000 from Zoo de Montpellier – Parc de Lunaret were sent to be used on an as-needed basis. Typical emergency requirements include: Equipment repairs and maintenance (e.g. boreholes, pumps, generators, geysers and water filters); repairs to vehicles that get damaged, as departmental budgets are severely constrained; perimeter fence repairs (whether due to flooding or vandalism); replacement of small items of equipment needed to keep Park operations functional (e.g. camera-trap batteries, cables); repairs to the repeaters in the Park, and cement to patch potholes; transport costs to obtain routine services, quotes, callouts; fixing emergency electrical issues; and any occasional needs for which there is no allocated budget, e.g. procuring rifle safes, in order to be compliant with Park safety rules
  • $15,137.79 from Ardea Cares’ grant of $75,000 was sent to pay Tacticom Pty Ltd for the hardware needed for automatic number-plate recognition (APNR) cameras operating in and around Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, which has experienced an upsurge in poaching during the last 18 months

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • $7,864.42 from the Wildcat Foundation was sent to help pay for law-enforcement activities in North Luangwa National Park: salaries for Village Game Scouts and the Strategic Law-Enforcement Technical Advisor; training; incentives for excellent performance; vehicle fuel maintenance; and aerial surveillance (Cessna fixed-wing aircraft and helicopter)

Lowveld Rhino Trust, Zimbabwe

Follow-the-money investigation, Africa

  • £10,000 from the Mark Leonard Trust was used to help cover continued work (during the period January-March 2024) on Project Blood Orange, the follow-the-money investigation into a major rhino-poaching and rhino-horn-trafficking network

Indian Rhino Vision 2.0, India

Ujung Kulon National Park, Indonesia

Way Kambas National Park, Indonesia

Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, Indonesia

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya – Administrator

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

Lowveld Rhino Trust, Zimbabwe

  • We sent several payments from misc. restricted donations to cover the Lowveld Rhino Trust’s rhino-monitoring costs: £820 to pay Caton Schutte for work from January-March 2024 inclusive on inputting rhino-monitoring data; £760 to pay Beth Lambert for work from November 2023-March 2024 inclusive on inputting rhino-monitoring data; and £600 to pay Touran Reddaway for work from January-March 2024 inclusive on website maintenance on behalf of the Lowveld Rhino Trust

Education for Nature-Vietnam, Viet Nam

Environmental Investigation Agency, China

African Rhino Specialist GroupPachyderm

Canine units, Africa

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya – 51 Degrees

  • $970 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) via Project UPTICK paid for 51 Degrees’ trainer to write up reports on training courses delivered for rangers in Laikipia-Meru conservancies

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya – ForRangers

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • We sent £2,000, donated by Joe and Minnie MacHale, towards the medical care and expenses of five rangers injured in an ambush while responding, at the request of a neighbouring community, to reports of livestock theft. They have responded well to surgery and treatment, and are now being monitored as outpatients by the Borana Mobile Health Clinic
  • $21,000 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) via Project UPTICK paid for 30 of Borana’s rangers to undergo the 10-day Rhino Tactical Refresher course, when key skills are taught and each ranger’s aptitude and progress since the previous course are assessed

Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya

  • $4,461 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) via Project UPTICK paid for 2 x 2-day Ops Room and EarthRanger User refresher training courses (one at the KWS Tsavo West HQ, the other at the South Conservation rea HQ: $2,900 for the trainer’s fees, and $1,561 for travel and subsistence costs incurred during the training

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $10,000 raised by participants in the 2023 ForRangers Ultra was awarded to improve the welfare of rangers working at Ol Jogi. The grant will pay for: law-enforcement equipment; uniforms; training sessions on snake handling and identification that will equip rangers with the necessary skills to mitigate risks and respond effectively to snake encounters, ensuring both their safety and the preservation of wildlife; cross-fit training sessions (the rangers want to learn how to use the gym equipment properly to get the best out of what has been provided, to prevent injury, and to be guided on what programmes are best for optimal fitness and strength); and smartphones to increase communications efficiency and connectivity
  • $21,000 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) via Project UPTICK paid for 30 of Ol Jogi’s rangers to undergo the 10-day Rhino Tactical Refresher course, when key skills are taught and each ranger’s aptitude and progress since the previous course are assessed

Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya

Sera Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

Rhino Resource Center, UK

  • We sent €1,500 from our core funds to help cover the cost of maintaining the Rhino Resource Center’s website. This is a very valuable site that has pdfs of research papers and images collated over decades, which are invaluable for scientists, researchers, academics, students and field programme managers alike

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • £250 donated by Piers Winton, and another £250 donated by Charlie Brough, was sent to Borana Conservancy, which is managing a multi-year project at neighbouring Lokusero Primary School, whose facilities are being upgraded: solar power, improved ablutions blocks, elephant-proof fence, a garden and playground etc.
  • We also forwarded a grant of £7,500, following Borana’s winning of an award from OutThere Magazine, to be allocated to the Mobile Health Clinic, including upgrading the Clinic building in line with Kenyan Ministry of Health regulations

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • Thanks to a grant of $50,000 from Conservation Nation, we were able to support the Y2 (calendar year 2024) costs of the project entitled “Breaking barriers to create female participation in natural resource management”. Specifically, this project seeks to increase female representation in the wildlife protection sector in North Luangwa by focusing on: Salaries of Community Conservation Educators ($2,400); Travel for meetings, spousal visits into the Park etc. ($23,820); Training – train-the-trainer fitness instruction, girls’ clubs, gender-based violence training, and menstrual hygiene management ($5,000); Supplies – office and admin supplies, design and printing of awareness materials and Ufulu period pads ($11,130); and fitness clothing for trainers, staff, spouses’ fitness groups and vulnerable groups ($7,650).

Lowveld Rhino Trust, Zimbabwe

  • We paid £28.99 from miscellaneous donations received for LRT to renew its website domain name for the period 1 April 2024-31 March 2025

Grants 2023 - 2024

Ujung Kulon National Park, Indonesia

  • We sent grants and donations from a number of donors to support the costs of the Rhino Protection Units, which patrol the Park to look for signs of Javan rhinos (footprints, faeces, mud wallows and browse activity) and also to deter, detect and detain any illegal trespassers within the Park: £4,500 from an anonymous donor; £115 received in misc. donations via our website; $1,110.26 (including $259.58 and $247.70 from Sanctuary); and £5,000 from the Simon Gibson Charitable Trust
  • We sent another series of grants to support the costs of the RPUs in Ujung Kulon NP : £3,835 (£3,000 from the Marjorie Coote Animal Charity Trust; £750 raised by Bethany Hahn; and £85 received in misc. donations via our website); and €10,000 from Wilhelma Zoological and Botanical Garden, Stuttgart

Way Kambas National Park, Indonesia

  • We sent £225 received in misc. dons, to be allocated to the Rhino Protection Unit (RPU) programme in Way Kambas NP in the southeast of Sumatra. As well as being home to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary’s captive population of rhinos, there are thought to be a handful of animals surviving in the wild in Way Kambas. The RPUs patrol the Park to look for signs of rhinos (spoor, dung, browse, wallows) and also retrieve and destroy any snares they find, and report any illegal activities, e.g. logging
  • We sent another £100 received in misc. donations via our website

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya – For Rangers

  • We allocated £6,200 from ForRangers Ultra funds to buy surveillance equipment, to assist Mogwooni’s rangers with dealing with security threats. The runners go through Mogwooni Conservancy on the last day of the Ultra
  • We awarded £32,328 from funds raised by the 2023 ForRangers Ultra, to pay for surveillance equipment for the rangers working at Lolldaiga, Ole Naishu, Mugie, Sosian and Suyian conservancies. It is hoped that, eventually, some of these will become rhino guardians, to expand the rhino range across the Laikipia landscape

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya – 51 Degrees Ltd

  • $3,638 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs via Project UPTICK to help cover the salary of 51 Degrees’ Intelligence Assistant
  • $13,925.45 from INL via Project UPTICK to help cover the salary of 51 Degrees’ Intelligence Assistant (backdated for a period of months, following a change request that was approved), who analyses intelligence and prepares reports for site managers
  • $1,819 from INL via Project UPTICK to help cover the salary of 51 Degrees’ Intelligence Assistant for January 2024, and again in February 2024, who analyses intelligence and prepares reports for site managers

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • We sent $2,675 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs’ (INL) grant for Project UPTICK to cover the cost of intelligence gathering and analysis during March 2023, and another $4,408 for LoRa WAN and EarthRangerTM support costs during March 2023
  • We sent $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during April 2023, and $4,408 for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during April 2023
  • We sent $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during May 2023, and $4,408 for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during May 2023
  • $2,675 from INL paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during June 2023 , and another $4,408 from INL covered LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during June 2023
  • Thanks to a grant from the ForRangers Ultra funds, we were able to send £6,200 to buy surveillance equipment, to assist Borana’s National Police Reservists with dealing with security threats
  • $2,675 from INL paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during July 2023; another $2,675 for work during August, and $1,000 for the biannual site-visit and on-site training by 51 Degrees’ Intelligence Assistant
  • $4,408 from INL paid for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during July 2023; and the same again for August 2023
  • $4,408 from INL paid for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs, and another $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during during September 2023
  • £16,000 received from an anonymous donor via Wild Philanthropy will cover the rest of the cost (in addition to Ardea Cares’ grant) of a new Land Cruiser for the NPR team
  • INL’s grant via Project UPTICK covered the following: $4,408 for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during October 2023, and the same again in November; $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during October 2023, and the same again in November
  • We sent $9,025 from USFWS (part of its Y3 grant covering calendar year 2024) to pay for 95 new MotoTRBO digital radios @ $95. Communications are key to effective patrolling, and all radios are linked to the EarthRanger system, so that the ops room can immediately see where each ranger is
  • $4,408 from INL paid for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during December 2023, and another $2,675 from INL covered intelligence gathering and analysis during December 2023
  • INL’s grant via Project UPTICK covered the following: $4,408 for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during January 2024, and the same again in February; $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during January, and the same again in February

Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya

  • We sent $15,493.80 from the INL 4-year grant for Project UPTICK to pay for ongoing IT support during March 2023 for KWS sites using EarthRanger: the KWS HQ in Nairobi, nine national parks (Tsavo West, Lake Nakuru, Aberdare, Meru, Ruma, Mt Kenya, Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary, Amboseli and Shimba Hills), and seven regional headquarters (Western, Mountain, Tsavo, Southern, Coastal, Central Rift (Lake Nakuru) and Eastern)
  • We sent another $15,493.80 from INL to pay for ongoing IT support during April 2023 as above
  • $5,148 from INL via Project UPTICK went towards the installation of EarthRanger: $3,786 for the set-up of an operations room in Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary, within Tsavo West National Park; and $1,380 to buy computers for KWS Regional Headquarters in Rumuruti and Narok
  • We sent $17,153.85 from INL to pay for ongoing IT support during May 2023 for KWS sites using EarthRanger: the KWS HQ in Nairobi, nine national parks (Tsavo West, Lake Nakuru, Aberdare, Meru, Ruma, Mt Kenya, Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary, Amboseli & Shimba Hills), and seven regional headquarters (Western, Mountain, Tsavo, Southern, Coastal, Central Rift (Lake Nakuru) & Eastern); and $4,848 for the installation costs of EarthRanger in Ruma NP ($2,173 for hardware, and $2,675 for staff time)
  • As above, we sent $17,707.20 from INL to pay for ongoing IT support during May 2023 for KWS sites using EarthRanger
  • We sent $17,707.20 from INL to pay for ongoing IT support during July 2023 for KWS sites using EarthRanger: the KWS HQ in Nairobi, nine national parks (Tsavo West, Lake Nakuru, Aberdare, Meru, Ruma, Mt Kenya, Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary, Amboseli & Shimba Hills), and seven regional headquarters (Western, Mountain, Tsavo, Southern, Coastal, Central Rift (Lake Nakuru) & Eastern); and $18,813.90 for from INL to pay for ongoing IT support during August 2023 for KWS sites
  • We also sent $816 from INL to pay for equipment for the operations room in Shimba Hills NP
  • $18,813.90 from INL paid for ongoing IT support during September 2023 for KWS sites using EarthRanger
  • INL’s grant for Project UPTICK paid $18,813.90 for ongoing IT support for Kenya Wildlife Service sites in October 2023, and again in November; and another $2,675 enabled the finalisation of the installation of the Ops Room in Ruma NP
  • $18,813.90 from INL paid for ongoing IT support during December 2023 for KWS sites using EarthRanger: the KWS HQ in Nairobi, nine national parks (Tsavo West, Lake Nakuru, Aberdare, Meru, Ruma, Mt Kenya, Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary, Amboseli and Shimba Hills), and seven regional headquarters (Western, Mountain, Tsavo, Southern, Coastal, Central Rift (Lake Nakuru) and Eastern)
  • We sent $18,813.90 from INL to pay for ongoing IT support during January 2024, and again in February, for the KWS sites using EarthRanger

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • We sent $2,675 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs’ (INL) grant for Project UPTICK (Uniting Protection, Training and Intelligence in Central Kenya) to cover the cost of intelligence gathering and analysis during March 2023
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during April 2023
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during May 2023
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during June 2023
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during July 2023
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during August 2023, together with another $1,000 for the biannual site-visit and on-site training by 51 Degrees’ Intelligence Assistant
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during September 2023
  • $2,675 from INL paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during October 2023, and again in November
  • $2,675 from INL paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during December 2023
  • We sent €2,500 from Rotterdam Zoo, together with $10,000 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, to help cover the annual operating costs of its K9 unit
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during January 2024, and again in February

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • USFWS Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund awarded extra grants in 2023, in recognition of the increased costs as a result of the war in Ukraine: food and fuel prices have particularly suffered. $3,463.57 (from a total additional grant of $29,091.89) will cover the increased cost of a new Landcruiser for the general security team, since we submitted the original 5-year proposal and budget in 2021.Another $4,335.16 will pay for bush modifications for the new Landcruiser
  • Once Ol Jogi had renewed its registration in US government records, we were able to reimburse the Conservancy for costs incurred via Project UPTICK during the 6-month period October 2022-March 2023: $17,050 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis; and $26,448 for LoRa WAN and EarthRangerTM support costs during the 6-month period Oct 2022-Mar 2023 Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • We then resumed normal monthly reimbursements: $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis, and $4,408 from INL for for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during April 2023
  • We sent $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during May 2023 and another $4,408 for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during May 2023
  • We sent €2,500 from Rotterdam Zoo to pay for Bennie van Zyl, who runs the K9 unit in North Luanga National Park in Zambia, to visit Ol Jogi to review its K9 unit: to undertake an assessment of the unit, develop new Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) and protocols, and provide some recommendations and training etc.. Any surplus will be used to procure new equipment for the unit
  • $2,675 from INL paid for intelligence gathering and analysis, and another $4,408 paid for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support during June 2023
  • £6,200 from funds raised by the ForRangers Ultra runners paid for surveillance equipment, to assist Ol Jogi’s National Police Reservists in dealing with security threats
  • $2,675 from INL paid for intelligence gathering and analysis, and another $4,408 for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during July 2023
  • $2,675 from INL paid for intelligence gathering and analysis, $1,000 for the biannual site-visit and on-site training by 51 Degrees’ Intelligence Assistant, and another $4,408 for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during August 2023
  • $4,408 from INL paid for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs, and another $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during September 2023
  • INL’s grant via Project UPTICK paid $4,408 for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during October 2023, and again in November; and $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during October 2023, and again in November
  • $4,408 from INL paid for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during December 2023, and another $2,675 paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during December 2023
  • We sent $4,850 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust for new LoRa sensors for Ol Jogi
  • INL’s grant via Project UPTICK covered the following: $4,408 for LoRa WAN and EarthRanger support costs during January 2024, and the same again in February; $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during January, and the same again in February

Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya

  • We sent $2,675 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs’ (INL) grant for Project UPTICK to cover the cost of intelligence gathering and analysis during March 2023
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during April 2023 as above
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during May 2023
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during June 2023
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during July 2023
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during August 2023; $1,000 for the biannual site-visit and on-site training; and another $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during September 2023
  • INL’s grant via Project UPTICK paid $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during October 2023, and again in November
  • $2,675 from INL paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during December 2023
  • $2,675 from INL paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during January 2024, and again in February 2024
  • $5,000 raised by the 2023 ForRangers Ultra runners was sent to buy a motorcycle ($4,100) for OPC’s wildlife rangers, 5 new batteries for rangers’ radios ($400) and $500 for OPC’s project administration

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • We paid $138.55 (N$ 2,480) from our own core funds to pay Lazaret Upholstery for new matting for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle, used during all rhino ops
  • The 5-year grant from US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Fund enabled a number of payments on the Ministry’s behalf: $37,389.10 to pay for 80 sealed drums of JetA-1 fuel for the helicopter and 15 sealed drums of AvGas for the fixed-wing used in annual rhino dehorning operations; $351.59 to pay Pupkewitz for vehicle service and spare parts; and $1,103.39 paid for a fuel advance for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used in annual rhino operations
  • We paid $839.25 (N$ 15,210) from USFWS to pay for accommodation for a member of NamPol tasked with the security of the rhino horns removed during annual dehorning operations
  • We sent $1,630.21 (equivalent of N$ 30,000) from USFWS to advance funds to Piet Beytell, the National Rhino Coordinator, for fuel for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used during annual rhino dehorning operations
  • We sent $24,944 awarded by our sister organization, Save the Rhino International Inc., to pay for an intelligence and informants operation in the Kunene and Erongo Regions during the period 1 July 2023 to 31 March 2024
  • And we sent $833.90 from USFWS funds to pay Waltons Namibia N$14,646.59 for lab equipment used during rhino immobilizations
  • $1,901.46 from USFWS for repairs to the rhino truck before the rhino operations taking place in Etosha NP
  • $480.79 from USFWS to pay for repairs to a generator used during annual rhino operations, to power the chainsaw used to dehorn rhinos, the fridge used to store genetic samples etc.
  • $1,649.30 (N$ 30,000 equivalent) from USFWS funds to pay for a fuel advance for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used in annual rhino operations
  • $5,301.64 from USFWS to pay Etzold Auto Repairs for repairs / spare parts / labour etc. for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used during annual rhino operations
  • $1,833.25 from USFWS to pay the Namibia Carnivore Research Trust for consultants’ daily fees, travel and subsistence while working on the Ministry’s Prediction Model, which aims to highlight potential poaching-risk areas
  • $1,601.38 from USFWS funds was sent to Piet Beytell as an advance for fuel for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle during annual rhino operations scheduled for October and November 2023
  • $28,397.49 from USFWS paid Namibia Helicopter Services for chopper fuel used during September-October 2023 operations
  • Thanks to Year 2 of the 5-year grant from the US Fish and Wildlife Service, we were able to make multiple payments on behalf of MEFT for law-enforcement-related activities: $1,632.01 to National Rhino Coordinator Piet Beytell for fuel for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle during annual rhino operations in November 2023; $10,652.97 to pay MES Investments the balance of the cost of constructing the rhino cow and calf release camp within Etosha NP; another $2,194.97 for fuel for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used during annual rhino dehorning operations; $290.44 to pay Radio Electronics for a MotoTrbo (radio) single charger for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle; $569.21 to pay Etzold Auto Repairs for labour and spare parts for a service of the Rhino Recovery Vehicle; $9,024.67 to pay Commercial Vehicles WHK for services of the trucks used in annual rhino operations; $1,900.44 to pay Autohaus T/A Truck & Bus for services of the trucks used in annual rhino operations; $7,795.52 from USFWS to pay Namibia Helicopter Services for chopper hours during annual rhino operations; $7,000 to pay DMP Statistical Solutions for work on the modelling software to predict poaching hotspots; $1,430.89 to pay Cymot for a chainsaw, blades, and fridge in which to store genetic samples collected during annual rhino ops; $4,748.24 to pay Puma Energy for 10 x 200-litre drums of Avgas; $11,388.86 to pay Skycore Aviation for labour and spare parts (propeller, radar altimeter) for the Ministry’s fixed-wing aircraft used during annual rhino ops; $1,078.98 to pay Jowes Oceanzia for a new seat cover for the MEFT helicopter used during annual rhino ops; $28,600.01 to pay Namibia Helicopter Services for chopper hours for annual rhino dehorning operations; and $8,580 from to pay Intricode Solutions for tracking devices to predict poaching hotspots
  • $25,000 (the second instalment from the total grant of $49,944 from Save the Rhino International Inc.) was sent to pay for an intelligence and informants operation in the Kunene and Erongo Regions during the period 1 April to 31 December 2024
  • £127.98 from the legacy from Ania Wanda Wasilewski paid for accommodation for four members of MEFT staff while on rhino operations

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • We sent funding from a number of donors to cover a range of law-enforcement-related equipment: €3,750 from SafariPark Beekse Bergen; €3,000 from Zoo Boissière de la du Doré; €15,400 (from the total grant of €15,900) from Zoo Zlin; and €2,000 from Parco Natura Viva & Fondazione A.R.C.A. These funds will be spent on camera traps and setup, including the associated infrastructure; on generator repairs and new portable generators, together with general electrical repairs and maintenance; on fence materials, including energisers, poles, polywire electrics and tools; and ration packs for field rangers on camping deployments
  • At the same time, we sent over funds received in sterling: £1,000 from the Betty Lawes Foundation; £400 from Chessington World of Adventure; £12,420.22 raised by our Save KZN Rhinos Appeal; and £1,000 from Richard Hollington. As with the euro grant, the funds will be spent on law-enforcement-related equipment; the remainder will be used to cover emergency needs
  • We sent the remaining €500 euros from the total grant of 15,900 euros received in February 2023 from Zoo Zlin, to be used as needed for anti-poaching work, rhino-monitoring or ranger welfare. To this we added €4,000 from Parc de Lunaret – Zoo de Montpellier, and €15,000 from Réserve Africaine de Sigean
  • An additional grant of $29,837 from USFWS, in addition to its previous grant for work in the Park during 2023, was sent to buy tyres for the vehicles operating within the Park, as EKZNW’s budgets have been further strained by the rising prices of fuel and supplies generally
  • We sent $32,000 (from the $50,000 total grant) from Ardea Cares, to improve responses to poaching incidents. c. $29,611 will be used to renovate and upgrade twin safari tents for SAPS officers based at the TACJOC. The remaining $2,389 is for Wildlife ACT’s administration costs in managing the implementation of this project. Having a fully operational Tactical Joint Operations Command (TACJOC, staffed by SAPS) adjacent to Nerve Centre (staffed by EKZNW), in HiP will facilitate the effective integration of responses to wildlife-crime incidents specifically in HiP and for 10 other rhino reserves in KZN
  • We sent $6,637.66 from Ardea Cares’ grant, and another $1,467.01 from core funds, to improve the accommodation provided for SAPS members at the TACJOC in HiP, specifically to pay CJ D’Offay Plumbing: to remove, supply & install existing collapsed tank with new reinforced calcamite tank; connect to overflow from black & grey water pipes; brick up and install 2x manhole covers; connect overflow of new tank to new emergency soak-away; and install existing submersible pump. All manholes will be exposed high enough, so no storm water can enter chambers. As an extra measure a bund wall will be built to further ensure no water enters the manholes. Another $5,596.32 from Ardea Cares paid Parkhomes Modular Units for air-conditioning / heating units x 6, plus the electrical wiring needed, for the TACJOC
  • $2,176.12 from Ardea Cares was used to pay Pietermaritzburg Electrical for solar lights and electricals for the helipads; and $2,287.11 from Ardea Cares paid NiteCore SA for 100 x helicopter landing beacons, to facilitate night-time deployments in response to reported incursions
  • $1,302.79 from Ardea Cares paid Onsite Computers for a laptop and associated software for a data analyst to monitor and evaluate responses to incidents within the Park
  • We sent £8,180.69 raised by Bradley Schroder, supported by Greg Canning, via the “Running Rhinos” challenge, that saw him running seven marathons in seven continents in rhino costume. Part of the funds ($6,725) will be used to cover aerial surveillance costs during 2024; the rest will be used for general purposes as needed in the Park, together with other donations as follows: £500 from Ansie Earle; £750 from Andrew Mackay; and £1,071.50 received in misc. donations via our website
  • We sent $37,000 from the Woodtiger Fund for Y2 of the 3-year $97,000 project entitled: “Increasing the effectiveness of Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park’s K9 Unit”. These funds will be used to pay for: the salary of the K9 Unit Coordinator; ongoing training of dogs and handlers; maintaining the K9 unit vehicle; replacing vehicle tires as necessary; maintaining the K9 unit’s camp; purchasing veterinary supplies as needed; providing and replacing equipment; and administering and reporting on the project
  • $23,291.10 from USFWS (part of its Y3 grant covering calendar year 2024) was sent to pay for tyres and repairs for vehicles deployed throughout the five Sections of the Park, as well as for miscellaneous spares and repairs to the Park’s equipment items
  • We sent $6,725 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust towards the aerial surveillance costs of the Savannah S light aircraft during 2024
  • A grant of £7,068.04 from Colchester Zoo – Action for the Wild, will pay for: repairs to motorbikes (£1,340.21) and quadbikes (£1,340.21); high-lift jacks (£1,298.97); mobile air compressors (£346.39); repairs to or replacements of vehicle seat covers (£1,010.31); and new Landcruiser pick-up canopies (£1,731.96)

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • We forwarded €10,188 from Wildlands Adventure Zoo Emmen, to pay for law-enforcement remote monitoring systems: R51,000 for FLIR Latitude 9.2 VMS remote camera monitoring software to update 2 x FLIR remote live stream cameras; R70,000 for 200 x 6V lead acid batteries for camera traps; R14,000 for 200 x rechargeable batteries; R4,050 for 3 x smart battery chargers; and R62,700 for management hardware required for the continued upkeep and maintenance of the Smart Park Network, including a WiFi router, touch screen and server cabinet. With restrictions on recruiting and training more rangers, uMkhuze makes excellent use of technology as a ‘force multiplier’ to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of its ranger force, but the technology needs regular maintenance and updating
  • We sent $8,476.50 (from the total additional grant from USFWS of $14,143) to pay for five extra sets of tyres for the Reserve’s vehicles
  • €1,840.05 from core funds was awarded to cover the salary of Jannie Lombard, Logistical Support Officer for uMkhuze Game Reserve, until another funder’s grant begins in October 2023. A critical component of uMkhuze’s effort to develop and maintain its objective as becoming one of the leading Smart Park implementers, is the need for technical capacity to support management in this development, and Jannie has proved invaluable assistance
  • We sent $4,450.12 from USFWS (part of its Y3 grant covering calendar year 2024) to pay for tyres for vehicles deployed throughout the Reserve

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • We forwarded $374,575 from Wildcat Foundation’s Y1 grant towards law-enforcement activities in North Luangwa National Park: salaries for Village Game Scouts and the Strategic Law-Enforcement Technical Advisor; training; incentives for excellent performance; vehicle fuel maintenance; and aerial surveillance (Cessna fixed-wing aircraft and helicopter)
  • We sent $300,000 from the Wildcat Foundation to help cover the cost of law-enforcement activities in North Luangwa National Park as above
  • We sent $100,000 from Wildcat Foundation towards law-enforcement activities in North Luangwa National Park as above
  • A grant of $12,500 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust was allocated to NLCP’s fuel and diesel requirements: specifically, through the provision of vehicle fuel for the Rhino Monitoring Unit to carry out vital monitoring patrols in the Rhino Conservation Area (RCA) for the full 2024 calendar year
  • We sent a total of $625,000 from the Wildcat Foundation towards law-enforcement activities in North Luangwa National Park: salaries for Village Game Scouts and the Strategic Law-Enforcement Technical Advisor; training; incentives for excellent performance; vehicle fuel maintenance; and aerial surveillance (Cessna fixed-wing aircraft and helicopter)

Lowveld Rhino Trust, Zimbabwe

  • We arranged for the delivery of $5,000 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, and £8,000 (£7,857.73 from the International Rhino Foundation, and £142.27 from misc. restricted donations via our website) for the Lowveld Rhino Law-Enforcement Task Force (LRLETF), which operates to integrate intelligence to prevent rhino poaching and improve prosecutions when poaching events have occurred. It is independently managed at an interface with the Zimbabwe Republic Police, while being supported financially and logistically by a consortium of support agencies

Follow-the-money investigation, Africa

  • We paid £1,326.25 from core funds (£1,579.50 inc VAT) to pay for the design of a case review for Project Blood Orange, to be circulated to stakeholders and to those who registered for the webinars held in March 2023, to share the key lessons learned to-date from the follow-the-money investigation
  • We paid a total of $134,429.19, thanks to a donor who wishes to remain anonymous, to pay KPMG for its work on Project Blood Orange, the follow-the-money investigation into a South African rhino horn poaching and trafficking syndicate
  • $1,242.05 from an anonymous donor paid the invoice from Accountancy Management Services Ltd for the Project audit for the IWTCF grant
  • We sent a series of grants to pay KPMG for its work during July-September 2023 on Project Blood Orange 1.0: the final $16,660.88 remaining from the anonymous donor’s grant of $150,000; $75,000 received from Ardea Cares; and $75,000 from the Woodtiger Fund’s total grant of $150,000
  • We sent £5,000 from The Mark Leonard Trust towards continuing work on Project Blood Orange; to help cover costs incurred during the period July-September 2023
  • We sent $50,000 from a grant from Ardea Cares, and $849.66 from our own core funds, to pay for continuing on Project Blood Orange 1.0 during the period July-December 2023 inclusive

Indian Rhino Vision 2.0, India

  • €2,500 from Rotterdam Zoo for Greater one-horned rhino conservation efforts was allocated to habitat restoration in Manas NP in Assam
  • €5,000 from Parc animalier et botanique de Branféré, and $12,000 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation, was sent to help cover the remaining unfunded needs of habitat maintenance work in Manas NP; any remaining funds will be allocated to the Wildlife Crime Training Courses

Ujung Kulon National Park, Indonesia

  • We sent £261 received in misc. donations via our website, together with $2,538.37 from Sanctuary, to be allocated to Arenga palm removal. This invasive plant chokes out the indigenous plants found in Ujung Kulon NP that are eaten by the Critically Endangered Javan rhino; by increasing the amount of browse available, conservationists are effectively increasing the carrying capacity of the Park

Way Kambas National Park, Indonesia

  • We were able to send £19,903.81 raised by the “Room to rhino” appeal for Way Kambas NP, held during November and December 2023, to be used for the reafforestation project that will restore degraded habitat in and around the Park, as well as provide fodder for the breeding population of rhinos in the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary

Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, Indonesia

  • We sent grants from a number of sources to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, located in Way Kambas NP in southern Sumatra, Indonesia, which is home to a captive breeding population of Sumatran rhinos. This comprised: £2,322.32 from West Midland Safari Park; £987.12 received in misc. donations via our website; €8,000 euros from Odense Zoo; €2,422.50 from Zoo Hodinin; and €260 from Tallinn Zoo – Fondation Lutreola
  • €12,805 from Tallinn Zoo – Fondation Lutreola was sent to help cover Sanctuary running costs
  • We sent £416 received in misc. donations via our website, and £3,500 from West Midland Safari Park, to help cover Sanctuary running costs
  • We sent €52,800 from Wilhelma Zoological and Botanical Garden, Stuttgart, and another €3,000 from Dublin Zoo, to help cover the running costs of the Sanctuary, where two Sumatran rhino calves were born in late 2023: female calf named Anggi born in September, and a male calf named Indra, born in November

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya – Administrator

  • We sent $153.47, from the grant of $25,000 from the Donald & Maureen Green Foundation, to reimburse the AfRSG’s Scientific Officer, Dr Sam Ferreira, for misc. costs associated with his participation in workshop to develop a new habitat-assessment protocol, to inform rhino range expansion in Kenya

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • $30,500 (from the total grant of $75,000) received from Ardea Cares was sent to help cover Borana’s continual rhino-monitoring programme: $27,000 for an Electric Polaris for rhino monitoring scouts; and $3,500 for 10 x pairs of binoculars for the monitors
  • A further grant from USFWS for Y2 of its 5-year grant was allocated as follows: $2,250 from USFWS for the predator-proof fence bordering Ngare Ndare to mitigate Human-Wildlife-Conflict. Since we submitted our original proposal to USFWS in 2021, the price has now increased to $13.75/metre (including materials and labour), x 3,000 meters. $4,500 from USFWS for the repair of Gaitano dam. Fuel prices have increased from Kes 110/liter in Jan 2022 to Kes 165/liter in Jan 2023, i.e. a 50% increase in fuel costs. Fuel is generally 30% of the cost of repairing dams, which takes the original quote of $15,000 per dam to $19,500, including hire of bulldozer, diesel, delivery of bulldozer to site and back, and driver’s subsistence allowance. Another $20,000 will pay for the creation of an additional borehole, since the rains have been enough for grass cover but not to replenish dams. These funds will cover the drilling, and Borana will seek matching funds for the pumps and troughs
  • A grant of $19,200 from our sister organisation, SRI Inc., will pay for the construction of 5,300m of pipeline and four additional waterpoints in several locations across Borana. This will expand the habitat available for wildlife across the Conservancy, and improve resilience in times of drought
  • Will Taylor very kindly donated £8,000, as a birthday present for a friend. In response, Borana invited the friend to name a 3-year-old black rhino calf, born to rhino Lou: the calf is now named Stevie. The funds will help cover Borana’s ongoing rhino-monitoring costs, as will another £34 received in misc. donations via our website

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • An additional grant of $35,787.55 from USFWS’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund will help cover the biological management and monitoring of its black and white rhino populations during 2023. $2,354.55 to cover the increased cost of training rhino monitors. The rise in the daily rate is due to the boarding facility designated for the training, and the increased cost of fuel for transferring the 33 rangers from their respective outposts to the training venue, since we submitted the original 5-year proposal and budget in 2021. $2,000 to cover the increased cost of buying SMART camera traps , since we submitted the original 5-year proposal and budget in 2021. This was necessitated due to a change of price from the supplier side and an increase in the shipping/clearing cost of electronic devices occasioned by an increase in taxation. $14,528 to cover the increased cost of rhino operations (ear-notching and collaring rhinos), since we submitted the original 5-year proposal and budget. This is due: to the increase in costs of helicopter, fixed-wing and vehicle fuel; higher KWS personnel costs following per diem adjustments to cater for inflation; and finally the prolonged drought has led to more rhinos moving into forest areas and as far as the Ethi area, resulting in more flying hours while the pilots search for candidate animals. And $16,905 to cover the increased cost of creating the elephant inclusion zones. Fencing has increased from $7.42/meter to $12.25/meter due to the increased cost of labour and materials
  • We sent $2,205 from USFWS (part of its Y3 grant covering calendar year 2024) to pay for training for rhino monitors working in the Lewa-Borana Landscape; another $5,600.92 from USFWS to pay for repairs to Dam Kubwa, prior to the onset of the dry season (he recent rains have silted up many of the dams in Laikipia); and $5,194 from USFWS to pay for fencing for the elephant-exclusion zones designed to allow preferred rhino browse to recover

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $330 from the National Geographic Society’s grant reimbursed Jamie Gaymer for the venue costs of a meeting with personnel from the Wildlife Research and Training Institute in Kenya to discuss the black rhino eye project and findings to date. Another $1,607.98 paid for the costs (personnel and transport) of the PIC-MAT workshop held in January 2023, which involved participants from Kenya’s Wildlife & Research Institute
  • A total of €5,260 from Erlebnis Zoo Hannover was sent to Ol Jogi to help pay for LoRa WAN sensors. All of Ol Jogi Conservancy’s fences will have LoRa voltage sensors, which will enable management to track all the livestock within geofenced grazing areas to better improve the rotation and improve pasture quality, as well as to track vehicles and/or rangers for more efficient fleet management / patrolling. In the future, Ol Jogi hopes to get more of the vehicle / ranger trackers as well as LoRa rain gauges; there are also opportunities lie with the LoRa bracelet for rhinos that is being tested and/or LoRa horn sensors
  • We sent £2,105.68 from donations restricted for the APLRS Emergency Fund, to reimburse Ol Jogi for 50% of the veterinary costs incurred in treating black rhinos during the period April 2022-March 2023. Four animals required interventions: Bobby was injured in a fight with a black rhino and recovered after anaesthesia and treatment; Lari was injured in a fight with another black rhino and, despite three interventions and being transferred to the bomas, died of sepsis; Ahti required anaesthesia and treatment after a fight with a black rhino; and, lastly, “Namunyak’s calf” was found in an immobile state, alone, significantly dehydrated and with injuries sustained from a predator. The calf was moved to the bomas and will now be hand-reared until it is old enough to be released into the wild

Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya

  • We sent £1,979.78 from donations restricted for the APLRS Emergency Fund, to reimburse Ol Pejeta for 50% of the veterinary costs incurred in treating black rhinos during the period April 2022-March 2023. Six animals required interventions. Schola, a young rhino cow, was treated after sustaining injuries in a fight with a male; however her prognosis was poor and she died of her wounds. Nargis and her calf were immobilized; tests on the calf’s eyes revealed that she was partially blind and unable to fend for herself. Mother and calf have been moved to a predator-free enclosure within OPC. Uhuru, a male, suffered a deep laceration during a fight with another bull; he made a full recovery. Kai’s calf was severely wounded by hyenas and was found alone; it received emergency treatment before being moved to the animal orphanage in Nairobi. And rhino cow Jo was found unable to stand. Supportive therapy was given (fluids, vitamins and antibiotics) but she died anyway. The post-mortem revealed a torsion in the colon

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • We sent £876.03 (N$19,574) from the Ania Wanda Wasilewski legacy to pay Cymot for a generator and battery for Mangetti NP to pump water for the Park’s rhinos
  • We sent $13,266.96 from USFWS to pay for 31 x LoRa rhino horn implants to aid rhino tracking in Namibian national parks
  • $2,806.12 from USFWS paid for board and accommodation for 12 people carrying out the 2023 block count (a method of surveying an area to determine how many rhinos, or other species) in Etosha National Park. Block counts are effective and efficient ways of doing surveys of very large areas and populations, where monitoring at individual level is not possible
  • $103,983.29 from USFWS paid Namibia Helicopter Services for chopper time and fuel while carrying out the block count in Etosha NP during August. The MEFT does a block count every 2 years in order to obtain accurate estimates of the Park’s black and white rhino populations, which then inform management decisions, e.g. whether to translocate animals in or out of particular areas
  • $907.20 from USFWS funds paid wildlife veterinarian Rob Jackson for assistance during annual rhino operations
  • $395.42 from USFWS was used to reimburse veterinarian Dr Axel Hartmann for fuel and subsistence incurred during recent rhino operations in Etosha NP
  • $3,103.38 from USFWS paid Africa Wide Veterinary Solutions for seven days of vet fees, flights from Hoedspruit, accommodation while in Namibia, and darts used to anaesthetise rhinos during annual dehorning operations
  • $5,896.91 from USFWS was sent to pay for construction materials (roof, doors, posts and labour) for a black rhino cow-and-calf release camp in Etosha NP. When rhinos are translocated, they can scatter out of the intended area while they adjust to new surroundings, and it’s important, particularly for cow and calf combinations, that they have a chance to settle first in a safe environment
  • Thanks to Year 2 of the 5-year grant from the US Fish and Wildlife Service, we were able to make multiple payments on behalf of MEFT for rhino-monitoring and -management activities: $590.35 to pay for laboratory supplies for rhino samples (pipettes, sample tubes, cryoboxes etc.); $1,000.92 to pay Pupkewitz Nissan for repairs and spare parts for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used for rhino operations in the field; $3,866 to pay TyrePro for five new tyres for the truck used to translocate rhinos between sites; $6,239.10 to pay veterinarian Dr Markus Hofmeyr for assistance during dehorning operations in the Kunene Region, together with international flights from South Africa and car hire in Namibia; $220.69 to pay Marey Upholstery for repairs to the canvas seats and awning in the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used during rhino operations; $3,688.17 to pay IGL Afrox for oxygen used during rhino immobilisations; $1,980.32 to pay Swavet for drugs (Thianil / Trexonil) used during rhino immobilisations; $2,661.34 to pay Pupkewitz Megabuild for misc. equipment and supplies used during annual dehorning operations; $23,053.74 to pay Africa Wildlife Tracking for a range of iridium satellite collars, horn implants and service fees, to aid the monitoring of rhinos, particularly in poaching hotspots and/or post-translocation; $3,811.05 to pay Swavet for microchips to be implanted into rhinos during annual operations   ; and $185.55 from USFWS to pay Ferdinand Tjombe Consultancy for assistance in obtaining a business visa for veterinarian Dr Markus Hofmeyr
  • We used £710.84 from the legacy from Ania Wanda Wasilewski to pay Dimension Data Namibia for the configuration of the rhino database desktop
  • $2,890.20 from USFWS was used to pay veterinarian Dr Markus Hofmeyr for assistance during dehorning operations, together with international flights from South Africa and car hire in Namibia, and a further $498.03 from USFWS paid IGL Afrox for oxygen used during rhino immobilisations

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • $15,200 (from a total additional grant of $30,000 for 2023 from USFWS) was sent to cover the increased cost of fuel since we submitted the original 5-year proposal and budget in 2021. SRT has 13 vehicles that are used by staff to deploy into the field, for staff welfare trips for food shopping and hospital visits, and for general administration purposes in Swakopmund
  • We sent a series of grants to Save the Rhino Trust to pay for increased water provision for the Kunene Region’s black rhinos: US $5,000 from the Reid Burns Foundation; £2,500 from the Betty Lawes Foundation; £1,000 from Paddy Walker / the J Leon Group; £913.04 received in miscellaneous donations; and €1,200 from Zoo Krefeld. SRT had originally considered digging a new borehole, but in the event, the Ministry advised that it did not want to go ahead with artificial boreholes, but rather to dig out natural springs that had become clogged up, to allow the water to flow again. For example, one area used to have several rhinos moving through it but, since its main spring dried up, they have moved out. The water is very close to the surface, so SRT will need to use a jack-hammer (which it already possesses), some cement, and lots of manpower; eventually it will install a solar-powered pump
  • We sent £3,087.76 (including funds raised by Berry White via the Solstice party, and £435.76 raised by Kenneth Donaldson via the Desert Ultra) for SRT; to be used for security operations in the festive season December 2023 / January 2024
  • We sent $35,653.33 from USFWS (part of its Y3 grant covering calendar year 2024) to help pay for ongoing rhino monitoring patrols done by SRT’s trackers: $15,653.33 for their salaries, and $20,000 for vehicle fuel
  • £11,311.77 (which includes £5,250 raised from the November dinner via the sale of three auction lots, £903.56 received from Andy and Mamju Banerjee, funds raised through Kenneth Donaldson’s participation in the Desert Ultra, and Berry White’s Mucky Weekend, as well as other misc. restricted donations) were allocated to rations, vehicle fuel and any other urgent need
  • $20,000 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, together with another $94.36 received in misc. donations, was sent to help pay for the purchase of a new vehicle for SRT’s rhino tracking teams; the remainder will come from trade in of one of its old vehicles
  • A grant of €17,500 from Zoo Krefeld was sent to pay for SRT’s Chief Operating Officer, Andrew Malherbe, to gain his Private Pilot’s Licence. Now that SRT is supporting the Rhino Rangers in Nyae Nyae Conservancy, in the northeast of Namibia, which is some 12 hours’ drive from Palmwag, and further from Swakopmund, it makes sense for Andrew to be able to fly between the sites for the monthly visits, saving valuable staff time and vehicle wear. Furthermore, the aerial capacity will aid rhino monitoring and anti-poaching patrols in both the Kunene Region and Nyae Nyae Conservancy

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • We sent a total of €31,250, received from several donors (€5,000 from Safari de Peaugres, €3,000 from Zoo de la Boissière du Doré, €3,000 from Parco Natura Viva and Fondazione A.R.C.A, €10,000 from Kiezebrink Focus on Food, and €10,250 from Stichting Wildlife) to to be allocated to a new, 3-year, rhino-monitoring project in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park. These funds will help to cover the Y1 costs of: Employing two extra rhino monitors, to create a team of three (so that two people will always be present and operational, relieving pressure on field rangers); providing fuel for the vehicles that will deploy them throughout the Park; buying 20 x VHF tracking pods, to be fitted to black rhinos, for improved monitoring in priority areas; and renovating or building accommodation for the monitors at a rhino monitoring base camp, to be located within HiP

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • We sent £5,650 from West Midland SP and another £412.50 received in misc. donations, to help cover rhino monitor Joshua Rogers’ salary during 2024

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • We sent a series of grants to help cover black rhino monitoring costs (salaries, rations, uniforms, transport costs etc.) in North Luangwa National Park: £25,000 from The Estate of Betty and Nancy Liebert; £6,235.65 raised by the dinner held in February 2022 in Cambridge; and £4,460.81 received in misc. donations via our website, and raised by the London Marathon 2022 and 2023 teams

Lowveld Rhino Trust, Zimbabwe

  • We were pleased to award $12,000, thanks to a grant from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation, to be used to help cover general rhino monitoring costs in Bubye Valley Conservancy: salaries, rations, and vehicle fuel and maintenance etc.
  • €7,000 from Dublin Zoo was awarded, split as follows: €3,000 towards the salary of the Rhino Operations Coordinator (Lovemore Mungwashu) and €4,000 towards LRT’s general office running costs (legal advice, accounting, and administration)
  • £480 from core funds was used to pay Beth Lambert for work during January-September 2023 on updating LRT’s extensive database on rhino sightings in Bubye Valley Conservancy

Education for Nature-Vietnam, Viet Nam

  • We sent €8,000 from Zoo de la Barben; to be allocated to Education for Nature-Vietnam’s Wildlife Crime Hotline through a series of short, catchy, humorous, and clear Public Service Announcements. The Hotline receives an average 10 reports/ day of wildlife crimes involving different species

Environmental Investigation Agency, China

  • We sent $25,000 from Ardea Cares to help cover the costs of Y3 of the “Changing China” project. This aims to strengthen the legal regime in China pertaining to wildlife protection, through support of local actors, direct advocacy and provision of expertise, with the eventual aim of stopping all trade in rhino and tiger parts in China. Its objectives are: to advocate for the adoption of a new State Council order and/or amendments to China’s wildlife laws; to encourage and amplify diverse voices calling for an end to trade in threatened wildlife; and to undertake research and produce analysis to support policy recommendations

African Rhino Specialist GroupPachyderm

  • We sent £5,611.93 from The Pachyderm Journal Fund established by the estate of Esmond Bradley Martin and managed by the Royal Geographical Society as sole Trustee towards the cost of producing issue 64 of Pachyderm is an international, peer-reviewed journal that deals primarily with matters related to African elephant and African and Asian rhino conservation and management in the wild. It is also a platform for dissemination of information concerning the activities of the African Elephant, the African Rhino, and the Asian Rhino Specialist Groups of the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC). Pachyderm provides immediate open access to its content, on the principle that making research freely available to the public supports a greater global exchange of knowledge
  • A further $1,982 from Save the Elephants, and $1,504.35 from Oak Philanthropy UK Ltd paid the balance of an invoice for the cost of producing issue 64 of Pachyderm
  • $2,070 from Oak Philanthropy UK Ltd was used to pay for editing costs for an article for issue 64 of Pachyderm that required a lot of input
  • We sent the remaining $4,225.65 from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Ltd’s grant to pay towards the costs of producing issue 64
  • We sent £500 from the sale of a painting by Robert Bateman painting to pay the final invoice relating to the production of issue 64 of Pachyderm
  • We awarded €1,500 from Save the Rhino’s core funds towards the editing and production costs of issue 65 of Pachyderm
  • We sent £1,961.19, being the remainder of the sum raised from the sale of a painting of a black rhino by Robert Bateman, towards the editing and production costs of issue 65 of Pachyderm
  • We sent $11,900 (from the total grant of $11,982) from Save the Elephants, for the production of issue 65 of Pachyderm

Canine units, Africa

  • We sent $7,799.02 (from the total grant of $65,000 awarded by our sister organisation, SRI Inc., to pay the deposit to secure the South African Wildlife College as the venue for the fourth canine workshop, to be held in September 2023. The workshop will involve participants from a wide range of rhino programs across southern and eastern Africa and expert speakers from all over the world, and will include practical training, detection, and tracking sessions, veterinary care, welfare, husbandry, conditioning and fitness and law-enforcement
  • We sent $665 from Save the Rhino International Inc.’s grant to pay Natasha van Zyl for her administrative and logistics support during June for the fourth canine workshop
  • $1,085 from SRI Inc.’s grant paid Natasha van Zyl for her administrative and logistics support during July for the fourth canine workshop; and another $1,225 her work during August
  • $21,672.83) from SRI Inc. for flights for 22 participants in the K9 workshop held at the South African Wildlife College in South Africa in September 2023; and then another $3,169.93 to pay for the flights for attendees of the K9 workshop who received travel bursaries
  • $204.09 from the SRI Inc. grant to reimburse Save the Rhino’s Operations Manager, who is leading this workshop, for her travel to Heathrow to attend the K9 workshop
  • $686.39 from the SRI Inc. grant to pay for hotels needed by K9 workshop attendees on their way to/from the South African Wildlife College
  • And Save the Rhino donated £17.16 worth of wristbands for participants in the K9 workshop, and £174.21 worth of Tshirts, as thank you presents for the speakers and as prizes for the raffle
  • $2,827.02 from SRI Inc.’s grant was used to pay Natasha van Zyl for her administrative and logistics support during September, as well as to reimburse her for stationery items and travel costs. Another $5,843.50 paid the balance charged by the South African Wildlife College, which acted as the venue for the fourth canine workshop. And £64.14 from the SRI Inc. grant reimbursed SRI staff member Yasmin Morowa for cellphone data and anti-malarial medication while she was delivering the K9 workshop in September
  • We received a refund of £886.42 from Key Travel for cancelled flights for the September 2023 K9 Unit workshop

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya – 51 Degrees

  • We sent $1,455 from INL via Project UPTICK for 51 Degrees’ trainer to write up reports on training courses delivered for rangers in Laikipia-Meru conservancies. These reports are tracked via EarthRangerTM, and show progress at unit and individual ranger levels, and help inform Conservancy Managers and HR departments of any issues that need addressing, or of individuals that merit promotion
  • $970 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for 51 Degrees’ trainer to write up reports on training courses delivered for rangers in Laikipia-Meru conservancies
  • We sent $970 from INL via Project UPTICK for 51 Degrees’ trainer to write up reports on training courses delivered for rangers in Laikipia-Meru conservancies
  • $485 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for 51 Degrees’ trainer to write up reports on training courses delivered for rangers in Laikipia-Meru conservancies
  • $970 from INL via Project UPTICK for 51 Degrees’ trainer to write up reports on training courses delivered for rangers in Laikipia-Meru conservancies
  • $970 from INL via Project UPTICK for 51 Degrees’ trainer to write up reports during September on training courses delivered for rangers in Laikipia-Meru conservancies
  • $485 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for 51 Degrees’ trainer to write up reports in October 2023 on training courses delivered for rangers in Laikipia-Meru conservancies, and the same again in November
  • $485 from INL via Project UPTICK for 51 Degrees’ trainer to write up reports on training courses delivered for rangers in Laikipia-Meru conservancies in February 2024

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya – ForRangers

  • £16,387.59 from funds raised by the ForRangers Ultra 2022 runners, to pay for 100 x Camelbaks, bladders and chestrigs, and 32 pairs of binoculars, for rangers based at Sosian Ranch, Suyian Ranch, Ol Maisor, Mugie Conservancy, Lolldaiga and Ole Naishu Conservancy
  • We sent £9,500 (ZAR 1,106,910) to the Game Rangers’ Association of Africa, from ForRangers res funds, to pay for life insurance for 2,456 rangers at field programmes in East and Southern Africa, from 1 July 2023 to 30 June 2024. The rangers work at sites in Angola, Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Tanzania, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe
  • We also sent a total of 62,705.73 to renew life insurance for rangers working at multiple conservancies in Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia and Nigeria: £42,401.37 of this came from funds raised by the ForRangers Ultra; the other £20,304.36 came from funds raised for the ForRangers initiative generally
  • $40,000 from funds from an anonymous donor for ForRangers’ initiatives was allocated towards the cost of a 2-year ranger training programme across Lolldaiga, Ole Naishu, Mugie, Sosian and Suyian conservancies. It is hoped that, eventually, some of these will become rhino guardians, to expand the rhino range across the Laikipia landscape
  • We sent £20,475 from the Tristan Voorspuy Conservation Trust, and another £2,325 from ForRangers’ funds, to pay for 105 pairs of high-quality Altberg boots for rangers working for Borana, Suyian and Sosian Conservancies in Laikipia County, Kenya
  • $5,000 from ForRangers’ funds was sent to the Local Ocean Trust, to pay for: 8 x waterproof jackets; 10 x branded shirts; 5 pairs of boots and reef shoes; 5 branded sunhats; 1 spotlight torch; 4 x headtorches; 2 night-movement cameras; 1 pair of night-vision binoculars; 4 waterproof slate boards; 5 x field aid trainings; gym equipment and training sessions; improvements to the mess / kitchen facility; repairs to window and doorframes in the rangers’ accommodation; annual medical checks; a new computer screen; 6 x staff lockers for onsite ranger accommodation and the LOC office; and 2 x Keysafe locks
  • Another $5,000 from funds raised by the 2023 ForRangers Ultra was awarded to the Taylor Ashe Antivenom Trust, to pay for: staff uniforms (shirt, trousers, boots & shipping $1,050); motorbike helmets x 3 ($100); medical insurance and AMREF Flying Doctors ($1,850); and staff training allowances across 30 courses ($2,000)
  • $90,000 from funds donated to the ForRangers initiatives was allocated towards the cost of a 2-year ranger training programme across Lolldaiga, Ole Naishu, Mugie, Sosian and Suyian conservancies. It is hoped that, eventually, some of these will become rhino guardians, to expand the rhino range across the Laikipia landscape

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • $34,285 (from the total grant of $75,000) from Ardea Cares went to pay for uniforms: for NPR armed rangers @ $10,112; and Rhino Monitors @ $24,173
  • $1,260 from INL paid for 4 of Borana’s rangers to undergo a 6-day Patrol Medic training course, when they are taught how to deal with wounds / injuries to themselves and/or their colleagues while on duty
  • We awarded £15,925 raised via the ForRangers Ultra 2022 to pay for new accommodation for its three Senior Commanders. Currently, one Commander oversees all general security on the Conservancy, which includes all rhino monitors and the fence-line teams. Borana also has a Commander in charge of the NPRs and his deputy second-in-command. The team would like to improve the accommodation for these individuals and build three new private rooms for them. Once these have been built the two lead rhino monitors, Wilson and Kiloku, will move into the current Commanders’ accommodation. These individuals work incredibly hard day and night, and the Conservancy would like to recognise this by providing them with improved accommodation
  • $1,680 from INL paid for four of Borana’s rangers to undergo a second 6-day Patrol Medic training course, when they are taught how to deal with wounds / injuries to themselves and/or their colleagues while on duty
  • $11,443 from INL paid for Borana’s general security rangers to undergo training with 51 Degrees Ltd. These courses are an excellent way for Borana’s management to identify rangers, who may currently be working on gateposts or fenceline maintenance, but are capable of more advanced law-enforcement roles
  • $21,000 from INL paid for Borana’s rangers to undergo the Rhino tactical refresher course; and another $1,747.20 was sent to reimburse Borana for the VAT charged on last month’s general security training course$1,750 from INL paid for some of Borana’s NPRs to undergo shared-asset training
  • $3,500 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for five of Borana’s to undergo a 5-day shared-asset training course
  • $23,598.60 from USFWS (part of its Y3 grant covering calendar year 2024) to pay for uniforms: each ranger will receive: 2 x green shirts; 2 x green trousers; 1 x pair boots; 2 x green hat; 1 x belt; 1 x green jumper; 1 x green heavy padded jacket; and 5 x pairs socks
  • $10,046 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust for a new 3-man accommodation block for the security commanders based at Borana HQ
  • $10,000 from ForRangers’ funds to pay for 32 x chest rigs, 10 x Garmin Foretrex and 30 x IFAK First Aid kits. The chest rigs allow the rangers to carry tactical equipment (such as first aid kits and trauma bandages) on their person easily, allowing the rangers maximum mobility while out in the field. The Garmins have been requested so that a team can call in a specific location to be relayed to the Joint Operations and Communication Centre (JOCC) based at Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, to another patrol or an aircraft. These are needed because there are some areas that do not have coverage either through LoRa or EarthRanger, so the watches can provide the specific locations in these areas

Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya

  • We paid $1,160 for Management refresher training for Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) staff in the use of EarthRangerTM at one of the National Parks supported via Project UPTICK
  • $7,540 from INL paid for user refresher training in the use of EarthRanger at one of the National Parks supported via Project UPTICK, and for user and management basic training in Ruma NP. Another $730 covered subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ trainers when delivering the courses for KWS staff in Ruma NP
  • $1,160 from INL paid for a Management basic training course in the use of EarthRanger at KWS HQ. $3,480 paid for a User refresher training course in the use of EarthRanger at one of the national parks involved in Project UPTICK, and another $2,320 from INL paid for Management refresher training in the use of EarthRanger at one of the national parks; and finally $927 from INL covered subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ trainer when delivering the courses for KWS staff
  • $3,480 from INL paid for a User refresher training course, and $2,320 for a Management refresher course in the use of EarthRanger in Aberdare and Tsavo West NPs
  • $1,740 from INL paid for a User basic training course, and another $1,160 for a Management basic training course, in the use of EarthRanger at Shimba Hills NP
  • $2,970 from INL via Project UPTICK covered subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ trainers when delivering the above courses for KWS staff
  • $1,740 from INL to pay for a User refresher training course in the use of EarthRanger at Tsavo West NP; and another $6,534 pay for a User refresher training course, in the use of EarthRanger at Ngulia Rhino Sanctuary, Mt Kenya NP and Ruma NP
  • $9,860 from INL to pay for EarthRanger training courses at KWS sites: User Basic in Narok, User Refresher in Nairobi NP, Meru NP and Shimba Hills NP, and Management Refresher in Amboseli NP; another $2,307 from INL via Project UPTICK to cover subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ trainers while delivering the courses for KWS staff
  • $2,948.28 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for training in EarthRanger for KWS staff: $2,320 for User refresher training at KWS HQ, and another $628.28 for 51 Degrees’ S&T costs while on site
  • $2,920 from INL paid for 2 x 2-day Ops Room EarthRanger Refresher training courses, one at the KWS Coastal Conservation Area in Malinda, the other at the KWS Central Rift Conservation Area in Hell’s Gate NP: $2,320 for the trainer’s fees, and $600 for travel and subsistence costs incurred during the training
  • Another $4,996 covered 3 x 2-day Ops Room and EarthRanger User refresher training courses (one at the KWS Laikipia HQ in Nanyuki in the Mountain Conservation Area, the second at the KWS Eastern Conservation Area HQ in Meru NP, and the third at the KWS Tsavo Conservation HQ in Voi): $3,480 for the trainer’s fees, and $1,516 for travel and subsistence costs incurred during the training

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • We sent $21,000 from INL’s 4-year grant to pay for 30 of Lewa’s rangers to undergo the Rhino Tactical Refresher course
  • $1,260 from INL paid for 4 of Lewa’s rangers to undergo a 6-day Patrol Medic training course, when they are taught how to deal with wounds / injuries to themselves and/or their colleagues while on duty
  • $1,680 from INL paid for 4 of Lewa’s rangers to undergo a second 6-day Patrol Medic training course, when they are taught how to deal with wounds / injuries to themselves and/or their colleagues while on duty
  • $11,443 from INL paid for Lewa’s general security rangers to undergo training with 51 Degrees Ltd. These courses are an excellent way for Lewa’s management to identify rangers, who may currently be working on gateposts or fenceline maintenance, but are capable of more advanced law-enforcement roles
  • $21,000 from INL paid for Lewa’s rangers to undergo the Rhino tactical refresher course; plus $1,747.20 reimbursement for the VAT charged on last month’s general security training course; and $1,750 for shared-asset training
  • $3,500 from INL paid for five of Lewa’s rangers to undergo a 10-day commanders’ training course
  • We sent $15,038 from USFWS (part of its Y3 grant covering calendar year 2024) to pay for uniforms: Each of the 82 rangers (general security and rhino monitors) will receive: 2 x green shirts; 2 x green trousers; 1 x green jumper; 1 x green heavy padded jacket; and 5 x pairs socks
  • $10,000 from ForRangers’ funds was awarded to pay for 100 x Camelbak hydration systems for Lewa’s rangers, and c. 185 pairs of tough boots that will withstand the demands of the terrain they patrol
  • $21,000 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for 30 of Lewa’s rangers to undergo the Rhino Tactical Refresher course in February 2024

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $2,878.80 (from total additional grant of $29,091.89 from USFWS) went to cover the increased cost of rations for Ol Jogi’s rangers. Due to the rising costs of rations, Ol Jogi had scrutinized the prices of foodstuffs from various suppliers to try to obtain the best prices and identified two suppliers. Ol Jogi has negotiated a contract with one supplier for a single payment with monthly deliveries for perishable goods and the opportunity to review the price fluctuations every quarter. If Ol Jogi had had to stick to the original budget, that would have significantly reduced the quantities of foodstuffs ordered compared to 2022 provision; this would have a direct negative consequence for its rangers. Thanks to these additional funds from USFWS, Ol Jogi can order the same quantities as it did in 2022, the additional cost @ 2023 prices is $239.90/month. Another $17,768.77 will supply rations for the new rangers’ canteen, built with support from the ForRangers’ initiative. This had been requested by Ol Jogi’s ranger team for a number of years but the funding was not available at the time. All the other rhino conservancies in Laikipia-Meru have canteens, which are greatly appreciated by the rangers. The facility allows them to receive meals and focus on their work, rather than having to cook for themselves every day, greatly improving morale and ultimately helping to conserve biodiversity better. And $645.60 will cover the increased cost of building three new ranger stations, since we submitted the original 5-year proposal and budget
  • $1,260 from INL paid for 4 of Ol Jogi’s rangers to undergo a 6-day Patrol Medic training course, when they are taught how to deal with wounds / injuries to themselves and/or their colleagues while on duty. And another $21,000 from INL paid for 30 of Ol Jogi’s rangers to undergo the 10-day Rhino Tactical Refresher course, when key skills are taught and each ranger’s aptitude and progress since the previous course are assessed
  • $1,680 from INL for 4 of Ol Jogi’s rangers to undergo a second 6-day Patrol Medic training course, when they are taught how to deal with wounds / injuries to themselves and/or their colleagues while on duty
  • $11,443 from INL for Ol Jogi’s general security rangers to undergo training with 51 Degrees Ltd. These courses are an excellent way for Ol Jogi’s management to identify rangers, who may currently be working on gateposts or fenceline maintenance, but who are capable of more advanced law-enforcement roles
  • $1,750 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for shared-asset training, plus $1,747.20 reimbursement for the VAT charged on last month’s general security training course
  • $23,100 from INL paid for 30 of Ol Jogi’s rangers to undergo the annual rhino tactical refresher course
  • £750 from Andrew Mackay, together with another £240 received in misc. donations via our website, was allocated to buy a large screen TV for the new canteen, which can be used to show training (and other) films, to build staff morale
  • $3,500 from INL paid for five of Ol Jogi’s rangers to undergo a 10-day commanders’ training course
  • We sent $14,953.56 from USFWS (part of its Y3 grant covering calendar year 2024) to pay for rations for the rangers. Ol Jogi secures a 12-month contract with the respective suppliers for monthly delivery. 103 pax receive monthly rations of rice, sugar, red wairimu beans, tea leaves, cooking oil & wheat flour, and 64 security-focused rangers also receive monthly rations while deployed of army biscuits, corned beef, tinned pineapple and tinned githeri. These rations not only improve motivation amongst the rangers but allow them to undertake the work for which they are employed, without the financial burden in this economic climate. Another $5,500 from USFWS will pay for a new housing unit for Ol Jogi’s rangers

Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya

  • $1,260 from INL paid for 4 of Ol Pejeta’s rangers to undergo a 6-day Patrol Medic training course, when they are taught how to deal with wounds / injuries to themselves and/or their colleagues while on duty
  • $1,680 from INL paid for 4 of Ol Pejeta’s rangers to undergo a second 6-day Patrol Medic training course, when they are taught how to deal with wounds / injuries to themselves and/or their colleagues while on duty
  • $21,000 from INL paid for 30 of Ol Pejeta’s rangers to undergo the 10-day Rhino Tactical Refresher course, when key skills are taught and each ranger’s aptitude and progress since the previous course are assessed
  • $10,920 from INL paid for OPC’s general security rangers to undergo training with 51 Degrees Ltd. These courses are an excellent way for OPC’s management to identify rangers, who may currently be working on gateposts or fenceline maintenance, but who are capable of more advanced law-enforcement roles
  • $1,747.20 from INL was sent to reimburse Ol Pejeta for the VAT charged on last month’s general security training course, while another $1,750 from INL paid for some of OPC’s NPRs to undergo shared-asset training
  • $3,500 from INL paid for five of Ol Pejeta’s rangers to undergo a 10-day commanders’ training course
  • $21,000 from INL paid for OPC’s National Police Reservists to undergo the Rhino tactical refresher training course during December 2023

Sera Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • A grant of $20,000 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust was awarded to pay for rations for Sera Wildlife Conservancy’s rhino monitors and anti-poaching teams. This will cover just over 50% of the annual cost for rations

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • We spent £883.37 from the Ania Wanda Wasilewski legacy, to pay MultiChoice Namibia for two annual TV packages for the K9 unit. The unit is based in a remote part of Namibia, and it’s important to maintain the morale of the K9 unit handlers
  • We sent another £4,474.31 from the Ania Wanda Wasilewski legacy, to pay the Universidad de Andalucia for tuition fees for Masters student Ms C. Louw, who works in Namibia’s CITES office, and whose research is on the genetics of the private Custodian properties’ rhino population. This will assist in management of the population in terms of parentage

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • £6,150 (£5,600 donated by the Tim Holmes’ trekking group and £550 raised via the Justgiving page) will be used to pay for Maigoha and Axab (mule camp) upgrades to improve ranger welfare
  • $14,800 (from the total additional grant of $30,000 from USFWS) was sent to cover the increased cost of rations, since we submitted the original 5-year proposal and budget in 2021. SRT provides rations for its own staff patrols (10 per month) & Rhino Rangers’ patrols (14 per month) = 24 patrols / month. A partner organisation did not confirmed its contribution to field rations for Rhino Rangers during calendar year 2023, which had left a gap in SRT’s field rations budget
  • We sent another £640 raised by Tim Holmes’ trekking group to help pay for Maigoha and Axab (mule camp) upgrades to improve ranger welfare
  • £2,000 from the Betty Lawes Foundation, at the request of David Neville, was sent to pay for gas stoves, pots, pans and cutlery for the new communal kitchen and dining area for SRT’s trackers and the members of NamPol that go out on patrol with them to cook and eat in. Any surplus was to be allocated to the Security Operations planned for Dec-23 / Jan-24
  • $4,409 from USFWS (part of its Y3 grant covering calendar year 2024) will help pay for rations for SRT’s rangers, who are deployed out into the vast 25,000 sq km Kunene Region to look for the Key 1 population of desert-adapted black rhinos

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • $18,931.86 from USFWS (part of its Y3 grant covering calendar year 2024) will help improve the living and working conditions of rangers working in HiP: the grant will pay for ration packs, for camping equipment, and for repairs to accommodation and ablutions blocks

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • Thanks to an additional grant from USFWS for Y2 (calendar year 2023) of its 5-year grant, we were able to send $2,200 to pay for the increased costs of refurbishing four camps (Nsumo, Mkhumbe and Mahlabeni picket camps, and Corporal South’s accommodation), together with another $3,466.50 to pay for the additional costs involved in the maintenance and refurbishment of the Conservation Manager’s kitchen
  • $26,000.03 from USFWS (part of its Y3 grant covering calendar year 2024) will help improve the living and working conditions of rangers working in the Reserve, specifically, to maintain and refurbish of three picket camps’ kitchens and ablutions blocks (Mshopi, Diza and Mbulaweni), and the Staff Sergeant’s kitchen

Rhino Resource Center, UK

  • We sent our annual grant of £1,300 from core funds towards the cost of the RRC’s website and uploading new rhino research publications. It is an excellent reference base, used by students, researches and rhino conservation professionals alike

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • £915.01 from the Wildcat Foundation’s grant was used to book a return flight for Technical Advisor Claire Lewis from Lusaka-London to attend meetings

African Rhino Specialist Group, Africa

  • We sent an additional grant of $24,000, from the USFWS Rhino & Tiger Conservation Fund, to pay for further days’ work by Dr Sam Ferreira, the AfRSG Scientific Officer, during 2023
  • We were able to award $11,988.80 from the Scott & Jessica McClintock Foundation (originally $12,000 but $11.20 was lost in transfer fees on the way to us, which we topped up from our own core funds), for the work of the AfRSG’s Scientific Officer
  • We sent $12,931 from USFWS (part of its Y3 grant covering calendar year 2024) towards the daily consultancy fees of the AfRSG’s Scientific Officer (Dr Sam Ferreira) and Ms Keit Mosweu (Programme Officer)

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • We sent $5,248.74 from USFWS (part of its Y3 grant covering calendar year 2024) to help cover the salary of the APLRS Administrator, John Gitonga, during 2024. John is currently studying for a Masters degree that will assist his work in analysing rhino population performance
  • We also donated £26-worth of SRI wristbands, given out in January 2024 by CEO Jo Shaw during her visit to the Kenyan field programmes that SRI supports

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • We sent $192 from Y2 of USFWS’s 5-year grant for subsistence and travel costs incurred by National Rhino Coordinator Piet Beytell, who travelled to Zambia to advise on potential rhino reintroductions

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • We paid £2,000 from core funds, £675.57 from a donation from Kenneth Donaldson and £44 from misc. donations via our website, towards the total grant of £2,719.57, to reimburse consultant Richard Hennery for daily fees, flight, visa and anti-malarials incurred during his visit to Borana in May 2023 to review the progress of Mazingira Yetu, the conservation education programme targeting schools and villages around the Conservancy. Key recommendations arising from his visit revolved around: reallocating the funds for community events during 2023 to redirect them towards teacher workshops and exchange visits; focusing on Mazingira Yetu’s Theory of Change (knowledge – Attitude – Competency – Behaviour) and working out how to scale interventions to appropriate levels for local communities; reducing the number of bus visits per week to allow time to reflect and evaluate; and the importance of matching monitoring and evaluation to the Theory of Change
  • We sent $288.13 (originally $300 but bank charges deducted en route to us) from Francis & Sandi Blake for Borana’s Mobile Health Clinic, in memory of Tony & Rose Dyer
  • We forwarded $10,215 (from the total grant of $75,000) received from Ardea Cares towards the Y2 (calendar year 2023) costs of Mazingira Yetu, the conservation education programme
  • £1,500 received from the Hart Family, following a visit to Borana Conservancy, was restricted for Mazingira Yetu; specifically, to help cover the costs of the salaries of the Conservation Education Officer and Assistant
  • We sent £5,000 from the CHK Foundation for the Mobile Health Clinic, for the period July 23-June 2024
  • We sent a couple of donations for the Borana Education Support Programme, made in honour of Ralph Winter’s birthday: $1,000 from Mark and Carrie Sisson; and another $1,000 from Raphael and Katherine Sidelsky
  • €15,000 from the Stichting Suzuki Rhino Club was assigned to the transport costs involved in delivering Mazingira Yetu, the conservation education programme; while another €20,000 from Paris Zoo helped cover the costs of the fitout of the Centre: misc. fitout (materials and materials and labour); misc. equipment for the classroom; school meals for students @ $340/month; and infographics (design and printing costs)
  • We sent $25,000 from the Springhouse Foundation, for projects at Lokusero Primary School, a boarding and day government school located in the Mukogodo Forest, which neighbours Borana Conservancy. The School is home to 370 students and 10 teachers, current enrolment is from PP1 to Grade 8. Borana Conservancy has been supporting the school with the construction of classrooms, teachers’ salaries and student scholarships. The Foundation’s grant will be allocated as follows: $3,500 to create a playground for the children; $500 to buy equipment including soccer balls; $5,000 to convert the borehole from diesel- to solar-powered; and $16,000 to use for priority needs, e.g. solar-power upgrades, new toilets etc.) Springhouse Foundation

North Luangwa – Lolesha Luangwa Programme, Zambia

  • We sent £1,073.01 received in misc. donations via our website for Lolesha Luangwa, the conservation education programme that targets the schools in the Game Management Areas surrounding North Luangwa National Park

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • Thanks to a grant from the CHK Foundation, we were able to send £10,000 to Borana for the renovation of the tourist lodge at Tassia, on the neighbouring Lekurruki Conservancy. Lekurruki may one day host rhinos, via the Laikipia Rhino Range Expansion Project, but in the meantime it is vital that the community sees the benefits of living alongside wildlife. The Lodge has already brought many benefits to the community, e.g.: many children have been sent to school; women have been empowered through employment as well as having a market for their beaded goods, arts and crafts; and young men have benefitted from being employed as guides and displaying their abilities with cultural tools such as fashioning metal objects, throwing spears and enjoying entertaining the guests

As always, our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.