Credit: HIP

A huge thank you to all of our supporters and donors for making the following grants possible

Here are the grants that Save the Rhino has made to programmes within the last 12 months.

Click on the months below to find out more about our recent grants.

More information on how we spend money can be found in our Audited Accounts on the Charity Commission’s website and Impact reports (latest copy viewable here).

If you’d like to understand more about our funding priorities, take a look at our grant-making policy. Further guidelines on applying for a grant can be found here.

We awarded £138,230 in grants, which broke down as follows:

We sent a total of US $8,375 for the production of the next issue of Pachyderm, the Journal of the African Elephant, African Rhino and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups, thanks to grants from the Oak Foundation and Save the Elephants.

We were able to award a total of £22,396 to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, for its rhino monitoring and community calf incentives programmes in Save and Bubye Valley Conservancies, thanks to grants of €14,340 from Dublin Zoo, €2,000 from Rhino’s energy, £1,000 from David Hale, and donations to our Great Land Share appeal.

We paid $65,717, thanks to a grant from USFWS RTCF, for veterinary and helicopter support for the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, for its annual rhino management operations that include dehorning, ear-notching, micro-chipping and DNA-sampling.

We sent another $56,300 from USFWS and $1,500 from our core funds to pay for the establishment of a canine unit in Namibia. Invictus K9 is providing the initial training, handler selection and then 8-week detection and 6-week tracking dog courses.

$18,627, again thanks to a grant from USFWS RTCF, paid for part of the costs of a Working Dogs conference that we, together with coordinator Kirsty Brebner, are organising in Johannesburg in early April. Some 45 people from wildlife conservation programmes in central, eastern and southern Africa, together with training providers and vets, will convene for a 4-day workshop to share best practice on canine husbandry, training, live deployments and interaction with a range of stakeholders, from the judiciary to local communities.

We sent £1,200 to the Rhino Fund Uganda, thanks to a grant from For Rangers and misc. dons. Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary recently saw the birth of the fifth calf to white rhino Kori, and another four calves are due in 2018.

Finally, we sent a total of £5,466 to the Long Run in Kenya, thanks to a donation by Andy Parker and to funds raised at the 2017 For Rangers dinner.

We sent out £25,070 in grants, which was split as follows:

£1,828 for Big Life Foundation in Kenya, to pay for a solar power upgrade for one of the outposts in the Chyulu Hills National Park, thanks to a donation of £1,460 from Camilla le May in honour of the For Rangers initiative and other misc. donations.

ZAR 17,000 from our core funds for Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, for anti-poaching work. KwaZulu-Natal has been hit particularly hard by poachers as security measures in Kruger National Park have been tightened.

£74 for Greater one-horned rhinos in Assam, India, as part of the Indian Rhino Vision 2020 project, for which we route donations via our friend and partner, the International Rhino Foundation.

£634 (including a donation of £401 received from Mareike Poelzer) for the Javan Rhino Conservation and Study Area in Indonesia. This will be used to help clear the invasive Arenga palm, which is adversely impacting the growth of plant species used as food by Javan rhinos.

We awarded another £60,700 in grants, which broke down as follows:

We sent a total of £6,977 to the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya, for its Emergency Fund for black rhinos, which reimburses conservancies for 50% of the costs incurred in treating orphaned calves or those needing veterinary care. $2,600 of this came from GreaterGood.org, £2,000 from the Marjorie Coote Animal Charity Trust and £3,000 from the Swire Charitable Trust. A small surplus will carry forward to help cover costs incurred during 2017-18, in that claims are necessarily made retrospectively.

We sent $1,439 from core funds to pay for travel expenses incurred by 10 rangers from the Kenya Wildlife Service in attending the managing informants course in October.

We forwarded $1,000 to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, thanks to a generous donation by long-time supporter Walt Brown. (We are holding other funds for the Lowveld Rhino Trust and will forward them once the banking situation is resolved; the currency issues have made transactions particularly difficult.)

We sent $48,722 from a USFWS grant and added another $3,978 from core funds to pay for new satellite and tag bracelets for the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia.

We sent $840 from Wildcat Foundation’s large grant to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, to pay for patrol equipment and accessories.

We awarded a lovely £10,106 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, thanks to donations received from Cotswold Wildlife Park (£1,000, for rations / vehicles), Journeys by Design (£6,100), which donated a holiday that we auctioned at our annual dinner, and other funds received via SRT’s online fundraising page and raised by Terry Driscoll, who is climbing Mt Kilimanjaro to raise funds for SRT.

Finally, we donated £1,200 to The Long Run, a UK-based charity that works with conservation programmes around the world, linked by the 4 ‘C’s: conservation, commerce, culture and community, thanks to the auction of two donated lots at our annual dinner in September.

Our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

We sent out a pleasing £107,888.36 in grants, which broke down as follows:

£11,510 to Pachyderm, the Journal of the IUCN SSC African Elephant, African Rhino and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups, thanks to grants from Save the Elephants ($4,869), the African Fund for Endangered Wildlife ($7,500) and the Oak Foundation ($2,795). These grants completed the funding for the editing, production, printing and mailing of issue no. 58 of Pachyderm.

We sent $5,763 from USFWS to trainer Wayne Evans, for equipment for participants in the course on managing informants, delivered in Kenya in October 2017. Run through the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries, the course included participants from the Kenya Wildlife Service as well as from programmes in Uganda, Rwanda and Zambia.

We sent £3,179 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, which is home to important populations of black and white rhino. Our thanks to Niel Joubert for his donation of £1,500, to the Zoo de la Boissiere du Dore for its grant of 1,500 euros, and to other donors for their support for the purchase of law enforcement and monitoring equipment.

We gave £400 from our core funds to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, to pay for four months’ worth of rhino monitoring data entry from Save Valley Conservancy and Bubye Valley Conservancy. Keeping on top of rhino sightings data means that any ‘missing’ animals can quickly be identified and followed up.

The North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia received a total of £19,168, thanks to a grant of $23,705 (the first installment from a total 2-year grant of $48,100) from Disney Conservation Fund for Lolesha Luangwa ongoing costs during 2017-18. Lolesha Luangwa is a black-rhino-focused environmental education programme that targets children living in villages surrounding the national park. We also sent $1,571 from core funds to pay the travel and visa costs for 4 NLCP officers to attend managing informants course in Kenya.

We sent £5,256 to the Rhino Fund Uganda, which included a grant from core funds of $1,255 to cover the travel costs incurred by the two Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary staff attending the managing informants course in Kenya, a total of £4,020 raised via the auction of two volunteer experiences at our annual dinner in September, and another £275 received in miscellaneous donations via our website.

Finally, we sent a total of £63,923 to the Zambezi Society in Zimbabwe, thanks togrants and donations from WildCRU, the Balmain Foundation, Peter Taylor, Decon Laboratories, Ken Wachs and other individual donors.

Our thanks to everyone who made these possible.

Thanks to our amazing donors and supporters, and especially the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund, we were able to give out more than half a million pounds in September: a total of £511,838. This was made up as follows:

We sent a total of £73,931 to 51 Degree Ltd for its anti-poaching work in Kenya that benefits a wide range of conservancies. $85,835 of this came from USFWS and £2,979 from long-term partner Chester Zoo, while the remaining $8,583 was from our own core funds.

We awarded £11,932 to the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries for the role of Administrator, Lincoln Njeru, thanks to grants of $8,054 from USFWS, £3,021 from Chester Zoo and $3,793 from our core funds. Lincoln works alongside the Kenyan national rhino programme coordinator in the Kenya Wildlife Service’s HQ, and plays a valuable part in ensuring that the private and public sector work together effectively on implementing the country’s black rhino strategy.

Big Life Foundation in Kenya received a total of £47,274 for its work monitoring and protecting the small but important population of black rhinos in the Chyulu Hills, based partly in the National Park and partly on community land. Our thanks to USFWS for its grant of $45,090, to misc. donors who gave $735 via our sister non-profit, SRI Inc, and to the Ernest Kleinwort Charitable Trust for its latest grant of £10,000, to which we added $4,509 from our own core funds.

We sent £37,013 to Borana Conservancy in Kenya, which co-manages a large population of black rhino together with neighbouring Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, for ranger training during 2017. Our thanks to USFWS for its grant of $44,100 and to misc. donors who gave $735 via our sister non-profit, SRI Inc., to which we added $4,411 from our core funds.

We were very happy to be able to send a grand total of £69,676 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, which has been hit hard by poaching this year as criminal gangs have sought out targets perceived as “softer” than Kruger National Park. Our thanks to USFWS for its grant of $84,269, to misc. donors of $30 via our sister non-profit, SRI Inc.; we also sent $8,427 from our core funds.

Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania received £57,591, thanks to a grant of $72,432 from USFWS and another $4,211 from our own core funds. These grants will help pay for a new water tanker to refill the artificial water pans in the Sanctuary, as well as help cover ongoing running costs.

We sent £61,016 to Ol Jogi in Kenya, which is home to both black and white rhino populations. The $71,200 from USFWS and $10,000 from our core funds will pay for a new Landcruiser to aid deployment of Ol Jogi’s anti-poaching unit, and help cover the cost of annual ranger refresher training.

We sent £5,074 to Kirsty Brebner, part-time regional canine coordinator. Kirsty has been liaising with canine units throughout subSaharan Africa and will be organising a dedicated workshop in March 2018 in Johannesburg.

Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, one of the programmes we have supported since our formation in 1994, received a total of £75,042, thanks to a grant of $90,795 from USFWS and $9,080 from our core funds. These grants will help cover tracker salaries, rations and vehicle running costs.

We sent £17,200 to TRAFFIC in Viet Nam; the last installment of £17,120 from the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund that had supported a three-year phase of TRAFFIC’s Chi campaign, which aims to change rhino horn consumer behaviour. An article on the Chi campaign by Save the Rhino’s Managing Director, Susie Offord, has been published in the latest edition of Pachyderm.

Finally, we sent a total of £56,078 to uMkhuze Game Reserve in South Africa, which, like nearby Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, has white and black rhinos and has been subject to a series of poaching attempts. USFWS gave $56,403 and we allocated a further $9,231 from our core funds.

As ever, huge thanks to our fantastic donors, supporters and conservation partners for enabling us to make these grants.

We sent out a total of £22,457, split out as follows:

10,000 euros from Zoo-Berlin and Tierpark Berlin for Education for Nature-Vietnam, for its demand reduction work to counter the illegal trade in rhino horn.

A total of £3,920 for Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa. ZAR 2,865 from our core funds was used to cover the travel costs of two field staff going to meet staffers from the US House of Representatives in Joburg in August, to discuss US government support for HiP and uMkhuze. £954 (comprising £545 from Hamilton Zoo in New Zealand and other misc. donations) + 851 euros from Zoo Schwerin will be used to help refurbish the canine unit’s equipment, while £2,000 from the Zoological Society of East Anglia-Africa Alive! will be used for the purchase of kit and equipment for Park rangers.

$10,000 donated by SUKULU + £154 from our core funds was sent to the Lowveld Rhino Trust for its rhino monitoring work in the Lowveld Conservancies of Bubye and Save Valley.

And £1,541 was sent to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, to help cover its annual operating costs during the period November 2016-October 2017.

We awarded a total of £97,862, broken down as follows:

$5,000 from our sister non-profit, Save the Rhino International Inc., went to 51 Degrees Ltd for its work on intelligence gathering and analysis, in the effort to reduce poaching and the trafficking of ivory, rhino horns etc.

£5,000 from our core funds was sent to the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya, for its Emergency Fund for black rhinos, to help cover the cost of veterinary interventions needed furing the period April 2016-March 2017.

A total of £59,436 for the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, again thanks to the Wildcat Foundation. $20,382 paid for a fourth round of ranger training by ESPA; $43,675 for expenditure on the construction of an armoury, and procurement of law enforcement equipment and the new Cessna; and the remaining $13,211 for Cessna running costs.

Long-term supporter Ales Weiner donated a wonderful £9,408, which he agreed we cut put towards the costs of importing new digital radios for Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya.

A total of £12,616 for Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, thanks to grants of $5,000 from our sister non-profit, Save the Rhino International Inc., and $11,392 from the American Association of Zoo Keepers Inc. for vehicle maintenance and running costs for SRT’s Proactive Patrol Section’s Land Cruiser.

A total of £7,539 went to uMkhuze Game Reserve in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, thanks to a series of grants from different donors: 2,000 euros from Rhino’s energy; 5,000 euros from Stichting Vrienden in Beekse Bergen; and 1,500 euros from Zoom Torino. These will support the purchase of jumpsuits and boots for uMkhuze’s rangers and help cover vehicle running costs for ranger deployments.

We sent out a grand total of £281,369, broken down as follows:

$10,804 from USFWS towards the conference package, board and lodging for participants in a course on managing informants, being held at Lion’s Court in Nanyuki, Kenya in October 2017. The host organisation is the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries, which works closely together with the Kenya Wildlife Service to implement Kenya’s national black rhino conservation strategy.

$52,000 from the ForRangers initiative for the Laikipia Wildlife Forum in Kenya, which is managing the training and equipping of National Police Reservists throughout Laikipia County.

$24,000 for 51 Degrees Ltd, thanks to a grant from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, for its work on intelligence gathering and analysis, in the effort to reduce poaching and the trafficking of ivory, rhino horns etc.

$760 from the ForRangers initiative went to Borana Conservancy and $2,470 to the Northern Rangelands Trust in Kenya, to cover the cost of helicopter medevac after rangers were caught in an ambush, after their help was requested by the local community to retrieve stolen livestock.

$10,000 for the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, thanks to a grant from the International Rhino Foundation, for its rhino monitoring programme in the Lowveld Conservancies; together with another £987 for work on the delayed Darwin Initiative project entitled “Harmonising land use in Save Valley Conservancy” and £400 for rhino monitoring data entry from our core funds.

$22,471 from USFWS went to the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania for its wonderful environmental education programme, Rafiki wa Faru, which targets 13-14 year-old schoolchildren based in the 14 villages nearest to the Park.

A total of £181,462 went to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia. $139,366 from the Wildcat Foundation was used to pay for Village Game Scout salaries, Rhino and Elephant Protection Unit in-service training; North Luangwa in-service training; performance awards, incentives and motivation packages for the Park’s rangers; and law enforcement equipment. $24,460 from USFWS will help cover the costs of Lolesha Luangwa, the fantastic environmental education programme that targets 22 schools in the Game Management Areas surrounding the Park. £7,283 was raised by Ed Sayer, NLCP’s Project Leader, through him running the 2017 Virgin London Marathon, and will be used to complete the provision of a water tank, stand and pump at Mano village. Another $20,382 from the Wildcat Foundation paid for a further round of ranger training by ESPA, and Wildcat Foundation funding of $38,586 was used to buy a Toyota Landcruiser for NLCP.

Finally, £1,950 received from misc. donations was sent to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, to pay for uniforms for Ministry of Environment and Tourism staff who accompany SRT on patrol in the Kunene Region: 12 x trousers, 12 x shirts, 9 x shoes and boots, 6 x jackets and 24 x pairs socks.

Our thanks to all the donors who made this grants possible.

We sent out a total of £135,001 as follows:

£2,725 went to a project hosted by the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya, to pay for flights for four Zambian rangers who will be attending a course on managing informants, being held in Nanyuki, Kenya in October 2017. Kenyans, Zambians, Ugandans and a Rwandan will participate, and we hope that this will foster long-term international cooperation. The cost of the training course is being funded by USFWS, with an additional contribution from our core funds.

£2,645 for Big Life Foundation in Kenya, to help cover ranger wages and incentives, thanks to a grant of £2,500 from the Treasure Charitable Trust and misc. donations. Big Life monitors and protects a small but important population of black rhinos in the Chyulu Hills.

£11,629 for Borana Conservancy in Kenya, made up of a grant of $15,000 from ForRangers for the purchase of new ranger uniforms, as well as other misc. items.

£4,377 for Education for Nature-Vietnam, for its campaigning work to reduce the demand for illegal rhino horn in Viet Nam, thanks to grants of 4,000 euros from Zoo de la Barben and other misc. donations spurred by Paul Blackthorne’s campaign.

$30,600 for the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe (of which $30,000 was from the International Rhino Foundation and the rest from our core funds) for its rhino monitoring programme in the Lowveld conservancies of Bubye and Save Valley.

A total of £25,151 for the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia. This included another payment of $20,382 from the Wildcat Foundation for ranger training by ESPA; £7,800 from the ForRangers initiative for the provision of a water tank, stand and pump at Mano village, to provide clean fresh water for 20 rangers’ families (c. 120 people); and £825 from Chester Zoo and the International Rhino Keepers Association (IRKA) and £738 from Rhudy Holly towards the cost of sending Claire Lewis, Technical Advisor at NLCP, to the IRKA’s Rhino Keeper Workshop in August 2017 in Denver, Colorado.

$40,000 to Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya, thanks to the ForRangers initiative. This was used to cover the cost of training National Police Reservists throughout Laikipia County.

$15,000 for the ForRangers initiative went to Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, to buy new sets of uniforms for rangers.

And £22,066 for Save the Rhino Trust, which works in the Kunene and Erongo Regions of Namibia, thanks to grants of $25,000 from the Glen & Bobbie Ceiley Foundation ($3,846 for the North West Security Workshops; $6,154 for rations; and $15,000 for Landcruiser running costs, and £2,688.50 from Niki Barbery Bleyleben for the ongoing costs of SRT’s rhino monitoring work.

We sent out a total of £57,725, which broke down as follows:

£8,424 for Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, home to important populations of black and white rhino. This included a grant of £6,294 from Colchester Zoo’s Action for the Wild for hydration packs and First Aid training for the Park’s rangers, and 2,500 euros from Parc de Lunaret – Zoo de Montpellier to be put towards the cost of a FLIR (thermal-imaging camera) + Gimble for night-time patrols.

£22,600 for the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, which comprised a grant of $20,382 from the Wildcat Foundation + $915 from our core funds for the first of five phases of ranger training, delivered by the Endangered Species Protection Agency, and another $7,227 from the Wildcat Foundation for costs associated with the import of a new Cessna and operating costs during the period January-March 2017.

£21,184 for Ol Jogi Conservancy in Kenya. Zoo-Berlin and Tierpark Berlin donated 5,000 euros each for ranger training delivered by 51 Degrees Ltd; and Yorkshire Wildlife Park donated a total of £14,388, of which £5,000 went towards covering the import duty on Ol Jogi’s new digital radios that will greatly increase the security capability, and £9,388 for constructing additional bomas in which to care for and hand-rear orphaned, injured or blind rhinos.

We sent £1,000 to the Rhino Resource Center, for its excellent work in making available to the world lots of online publications about rhino conservation, taxonomy, anatomy etc. Visit http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/ to search the extensive reference base,

And finally we sent £4,512 donated by Vanessa Buxton to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, to help cover rations, salaries and vehicle running costs for its patrol teams that must cover some 25,000 sq kms.

In March, we sent out another £95,363 worth of grants, taking our total for the year to a wonderful £1,702,204, which broke down as follows:

$1,175 from Save the Elephants for Pachyderm magazine, issue 58.

£198 raised by Team Travis, who walked across the Two Moors (Dartmoor and Exmoor) for the Dambari Wildlife Trust in Zimbabwe.

We sent a grand total of £10,673 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa to pay for the purchase of two quadbikes, which was made up of a range of grants and donations: the remaining $462 from a grant of $35,957 from USFWS RTCF; £795 received in misc. donations via SRI Inc.; £3,841 from Zoologicka Garden and Chateau Zlin-Lesna; $2,821 from Just Wheels And Tires TSW Black Rhino Wheels; £153.62 from Boras Djurpark; £1,005 received in misc. donations; 1,000 euros from Zoo Boissiere; and 1,512 euros from Knuthenborg Safaripark.

2,000 euros for Indian Rhino Vision 2020, thanks to a grant from Rotterdam Zoo.

£1,873 to Lewa Wildlife Conservancy in Kenya, to help cover the cost of its canine unit, thanks to continued donations to our 2015 appeal in aid of the Rhino Dog Squad (with particular thanks to Real Africa.

A total of £27,562 for the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, made up of: £326 in misc. donations and £24,482 from Peter Lawrence, which will be used to help cover the cost of rhino translocations later this year; and $3,381 from the Wildcat Foundation via SRI Inc., to pay 4th and final installment of Cessna purchase costs.

A total of £2,790 to Ol Jogi in Kenya, thanks to: donors’ (particularly Real Africa) continued support for our 2015 appeal in aid of the Rhino Dog Squad; and 1,030 euros received from Tallinn Zoo and Foundation Lutreola for the expansion of Ol Jogi’s rhino bomas.

£1,873 to Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, to help cover the cost of its canine unit, thanks to continued donations to our 2015 appeal in aid of the Rhino Dog Squad (with particular thanks to Real Africa.

A total of £17,503 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, thanks to: £6,308 in misc. donations (including those prompted by J Anthony West in lieu of 60th birthday presents); 5,000 euros from Zoo Krefeld; 350 euros from Zoo Bassin d’Arcachon; £1,174 raised by Henry Stratford and Jessica Cairns for SRT via justgiving.com in lieu of wedding presents; and £5,015 raised by the staff and visitors of West Midland Safari Park.

A total of £5,566 to uMkhuze Game Reserve in South Africa, thanks to a grant of £4,100 from Woburn Safari Park; £148 in misc. donations and 1,500 euros from Fundacion Parques Reunidos in Madrid. These funds will be put towards a helicopter white-box comms set up or a water-pump plus generator.

Finally, we sent $24,880 to African Parks, to pay for 2 sets of uniform and 1 bush hat for each of 120 rangers working in Liwonde National Park, Majete Wildlife Reserve and Nkhotakota Wildlife Reserve, Malawi; and £4,000 to Bioken Snake Farm / the James Ashe Antivenom Trust in Kenya, to pay for anti-venom supplies for Kenyan conservancies. Both grants were made possible by the For Rangers initiative.

In February, we sent out a grand total of £125,776 in grants, which broke down as follows:

$11,960 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust for Pachyderm magazine, issue 58

$10,000 for the core secretariat work of the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group, during the period January-June 2017, of which $7,500 came from USFWS RTCF and $2,500 from Save the Rhino International Inc.’s donors

$14,000 and £1,296 towards the costs of a course entitled “Informant- and crime-management training course for rhino program field managers and investigators in Kenya, Uganda and Zambia”, to be held in Nanyuki, Kenya, in October 2017.

$25,847 for Borana Conservancy from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, for the construction of 1 x accommodation & ablution block for Borana’s ranger forc.

$10,000 for Borana Conservancy’s Education Support Programme, thanks to a grant for the For Rangers initiative. This will be used to cover the education costs of the children of one of Borana’s rangers, who was killed in a motorbike accident in 2016.

A total of £15,350 for the Javan Rhino Conservation and Study Area in Ujung Kulon National Park in Indonesia, thanks to a grant of £15,000 from Paignton Zoo via its Great Big Rhinos initiative, and £350 received from misc. donors. The funds will be used to help clear arenga palm, an invasive species that has reduced the amount of available plant food for the Javan rhinos.

We sent £412 from core funds and misc. donations to pay for rhino monitoring data entry during the period Dec-16 to Feb-17 inclusive and for the LRT website’s annual domain name registration

£4,562 to the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania for replacement of the Sanctuary fence, made up of $2,406 from the Lubin Family Foundation, $3,166 from USFWS RTCF and $124 from our core funds.

£2,172 for Rafiki wa Faru, the black-rhino-focused environmental education programme run by Mkomazi, thanks to a donation of £2,000 from longstanding supporter Ales Weiner and other small donations received via our website.

$11,752 for Ol Jogi in Kenya, to construct expanded rhino bomas, thanks to a grant from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust. These bomas are used for any orphaned calves or injured rhinos requiring hand-rearing or veterinary treatment.

$6,754 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust, being the first installment of funding for the new post of Regional Canine Coordinator, held by Kirsty Brebner. Kirsty will liaise between rhino programmes using tracker and detection dogs on best husbandry, training etc. in order to share lessons learned.

$17,800 from the Community Foundation for the Greater Capital Region’s Drilling for Hope Fund, for borehole construction at the Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary in Uganda. We also sent £188-worth of baseball caps and badges etc. for Ziwa’s rangers.

£15,100 for the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia, thanks to a grant of £15,000 from Paignton Zoo via its Great Big Rhinos initiative, and £100 received from misc. donors. The funds will be used to expand the Sanctuary so that it has room for up to 10 rhinos in an intensive management situation, to optimise breeding chances.