Thank you for making our grants possible!

A ranger smiling. Rangers save rhinos each day.
Credit: Tristan Vince

Click on the sections below to see the grants we’ve sent so far this year.

Further down, you’ll see all of the grants we sent between April 2021 and March 2022.

More information on how we spend money can be found in our Audited Accounts on the Charity Commission’s website and Impact reports (latest copy viewable here).

If you’d like to understand more about our funding priorities, take a look at our grant-making policy. Further guidelines on applying for a grant can be found here.

Grants so far, 2022-2023

Indian Rhino Vision RV2020, India

  • We sent €2,000 from Parc animalier et botanique de Branféré; to be used for habitat maintenance work in Manas National Park, which is home to a growing population of Greater one-horned rhinos, thanks to Indian Rhino Vision 2020’s reintroductions of the species

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • $1,819 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) paid for the salary for the Intelligence Assistant during March 2022 through Project UPTICK. Another $690 paid for cellphone contracts for two staff members during Q1, 2022
  • $1,819 from INL paid the salary of the Intelligence Assistant during April 2022, funded through Project UPTICK
  • $1,819 from INL for the salary for the Intelligence Assistant during May 2022, funded by INL through Project UPTICK
  • $1,819 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) paid for the salary for the Intelligence Assistant during June 2022 through Project UPTICK. Another $690 paid for cellphone contracts for two staff members during Q2, 2022

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • $5,618 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) paid for aerial surveillance ($5,067 for fixed-wing; $551 for helicopter) over Borana and its neighbours during March 2022, through Project UPTICK. A further $2,675 paid for for intelligence gathering & analysis during March 2022
  • £316 received in misc. donations via our website was transferred to help cover general Conservancy operating costs
  • $2,361 from INL paid for fixed-wing aerial surveillance of Borana and its neighbours during April 2022 and another $2,675 covered the cost of intelligence gathering and analysis, funded through Project UPTICK
  • $3,822 from INL paid for fixed-wing aerial surveillance of Borana and its neighbours during May 2022 and another $2,675 paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during May, and $385.20 for food for source handlers during a training course
  • $4,123 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance of Borana and its neighbours during June 2022, and $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during June, funded by the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs

Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya

  • $5,034.79 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) paid for IT support provided during March 2022 by 51 Degrees Ltd on the use of EarthRangerTM, a situational-analysis tool that allows live tracking and monitoring of all assets in the protected area
  • $5,034.79 from INL paid for IT support provided during April 2022 by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRangerTM
  • $5,034.79 from INL paid for IT support provided during May 2022 by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRangerTM
  • $5,034.79 for IT support provided during June 2022 by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRangerTM

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $2,675 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during March 2022. Another $8,271.10 paid for aerial surveillance ($2,236.30 for fixed-wing; $6,034.80 for chopper) over Lewa and its neighbours during March 2022, again through Project UPTICK
  • We sent grants / donations from several donors to help cover the cost of Lewa’s canine unit (two dogs and five handlers): £325 received in miscellaneous donations via our website, €1,000 from Rotterdam Zoo, and £1,250 from the Betty Lawes Foundation. Lewa’s canine unit was involved in 14 live deployments during 2021, as well as training sessions six times a week
  • $8,859.60 from INL paid for helicopter surveillance of Lewa and its neighbours during April 2022 and another $2,675 covered the cost of intelligence gathering and analysis
  • $13,445.62 from INL paid for fixed-wing and chopper time during May 2022: $11,941.20 for helicopter flying time during shared-asset training and aerial surveillance over Lewa and its neighbours; and $1,504.42 for fixed-wing flying time. Another $2,675 covered the cost of intelligence gathering and analysis during May
  • $10,462.46 from INL paid for fixed-wing and chopper time during June 2022: $10,015.20 for helicopter flying time for aerial surveillance over Lewa and its neighbours; and $447.26 for fixed-wing flying time. Another $2,675 covered the cost of intelligence gathering and analysis during June

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • We sent $3,045 for fixed-wing surveillance over Ol Jogi and its neighbours during March 2022, funded by the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) through Project UPTICK. A further $2,675 paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during March 2022
  • We sent grants / donations from several donors to help cover the cost of Ol Jogi’s canine unit: €150 euros and £642 received in misc. donations via our website; €1,000 euros from Rotterdam Zoo; and £1,250 from the Betty Lawes Foundation. There are currently five dogs in Ol Jogi’s canine unit: four working detector dogs (all Bloodhounds) and one retired attack dog (a Belgian Malinois). Two of the Bloodhounds are puppies that were bred at nearby Ol Pejeta Conservancy. They are now one year old and are progressing well with their training
  • $2,033 from INL paid for fixed-wing aerial surveillance of Ol Jogi and its neighbours, and another $2,675 paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during April 2022, funded by INL through Project UPTICK
  • $2,033 from INL paid for fixed-wing aerial surveillance over Ol Jogi and its neighbours during May 2022; $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during May, and $385.20 for food for source handlers during a training course
  • $2,675 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during June

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • The Woodtiger Fund’s grant paid for several invoices connected with rhino operations (dehorning for security purposes) on private and community custodian properties: $3,771.03 (N$ 57,300) paid Piet Beytell an advance for fuel for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle for rhino ops in June 2022, and for subsistence and travel allowances for 5 x MEFT personnel involved in the operations; $3,280.78 paid Etzold Auto Repairs CC for repairs (labour and parts) to the Rhino Recovery Vehicle; and $2,151.40 paid for new tyres for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle
  • The grant from USFWS paid other invoices for upcoming rhino operations: $11,619.65 paid for 30 drums of fuel for the Ministry’s helicopter; $18,600 paid for 10 x scavenger tracking devices to aid carcass detection; and $36,078.53 paid for 15 satellite bracelets for rhinos and five collars for predators to aid carcass detection, plus the annual satellite fees

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • We sent $27,544 awarded by our sister organization, Save the Rhino International Inc., $1,000 from the Bernard F. and Alva B. Gimbel Foundation, €1,000 from Monde Sauvage Safari Parc, and $6 from our own core funds to help pay for a new Toyota Hilux, to be used by the anti-poaching teams in Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park. Providing a new vehicle will: allow consistent and reliable vehicle support for patrol teams operating on foot during reactions and medical emergencies; reduce maintenance costs; and allow vehicle access to a larger proportion of the Wilderness Area. Vehicles are the lifeline in HiP, and can often mean the difference between success and failure, or between life and death
  • £5,000 from the Betty Lawes Foundation completed the fundraising campaign for the cost of a new Toyota Hilux 2.4GD-6 4×4 SR, plus summit bull bar (Toyota ARB) and cattle railings

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • £1,098.12 from core funds and £312.56 from misc. restricted donations received via our website covered the cost of the renewal of annual insurance policy for uMkhuze’s Foxbat light aircraft

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • We sent $200,000 from the Wildcat Foundation towards law-enforcement activities in North Luangwa National Park: salaries for Village Game Scouts and the Strategic Law-Enforcement Technical Advisor; training; incentives for excellent performance; vehicle fuel maintenance; and aerial surveillance (Cessna fixed-wing aircraft and helicopter)

Follow the money investigation, Africa

  • We sent a series of transfers to pay for a follow-the-money investigation into a rhino-poaching and rhino-horn-trafficking syndicate operating in sub-Saharan Africa: ZAR 65,487.76 from core funds; ZAR 142,646.84 from MalaMala Game Reserve (PTY) Ltd; £52,257.02 funded by the UK Government through the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund; and another ZAR 21,664.66 from MalaMala Game Reserve (PTY) Ltd
  • £63,383.71 from the UK Government’s IWTCF paid for Y2Q2 work on the follow-the-money investigation

Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area, Indonesia

  • We sent £565.51 received in miscellaneous donations via our website, and a $1,790.32 donation from Sanctuary, to help pay for Arenga palm eradication in Ujung Kulon National Park and the adjacent Gunung Honje area. The work will take place in Q4 2022

Rhino Protection Unit programme, Indonesia

  • We transferred £1,167.50 received in misc. donations via our website for the reafforestation project around the boundary of Way Kambas National Park in Lampung Province in southern Sumatra. This project provides employment for local villages while improving habitat for wildlife and birds in the National Park

Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, Indonesia

  • We sent a series of grants to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Way Kambas National Park, where the third captive-bred Sumatran rhino calf was born on 24 March 2022, giving new hope for the survival of the species: €16,062.46 euros from Fondation Lutreola; £958.04 received in misc. donations via our website; £2,341.92 from Speake-Marin; £6,235.65 raised by the Cambridge dinner for the SRS (25% of total income), hosted by former Trustee Tim Holmes; £1,250 from West Midland Safari Park; and €1,454 euros from Zoo Hodonín. The funds will help pay for the SRS’s running costs: staff salaries, Sanctuary maintenance, and daily fresh browse for the growing population of rhinos

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • We sent $28,861.19, funded by the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, to pay for helicopter and fixed-wing flying hours over Ol Jogi and its neighbours during June 2022. During the month, Ol Jogi carried out ear-notching operations so that sub-adults can be identified after they leave their mothers. The ability to ID individual animals is crucial not only for monitoring rhino population performance, but also to identify any ‘missing’ animals that might have been poached, when early detection is vital if rangers are to be able to follow up via intelligence, canine units etc.

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • $1,127.30 from the Woodtiger Fund paid for maintenance and replacement parts for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used in annual dehorning and translocation operations
  • We sent a series of grants from the Woodtiger Fund to pay for items needed for the Ministry’s annual rhino operations: $2,350.69 to pay Pupkewitz for misc. consumable items (chisel set, tape measure, hacksaw steel frame, claw hammer etc.); $9,643.69 to pay TyrePro for new tyres for the trucks used in the operations; a total of $628.04 to Piet Beytell, Hans Swartbooi, Hermanus Benjamin Le Roux and De Wet Simasiku for travel and subsistence; $1,689.72 to pay Mast’s Garage for repairs to the truck; $2,244.77 to pay Fo-Sho Auto Repairs for repairs to another truck; and $974.65 to Piet Beytell for fuel for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle
  • The Woodtiger Fund also paid $83.32 for five magnetic stickers for the rhino crates used in rhino translocations, and $1,927.02 to Piet Beytell for fuel for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used for rhino ops
  • $1,756.44 from the Valerie G Merrin 2006 Trust paid for a new solar pump and installation at one of the waterholes used by rhino in Etosha NP
  • $1,336.94 from the 5-year USFWS grant paid veterinarian Ortwin Aschenborn for his fees for leading rhino dehorning ops during May 2022
  • $12,000 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation was sent to support rhino monitoring in Nyae Nyae Conservancy. Originally intended to be used to pay for rhino monitoring equipment in Nyae Nyae Conservancy, we agreed that it could be spent on rations, salaries and rhino / field-day bonuses for Nyae Nyae’s trackers
  • $719.12 from the Woodtiger Fund was advanced to the National Rhino Coordinator for subsistence and travel costs for Piet, Hans Swartbooi, Hermanus Benjamin Le Roux, Nicolas Hafeni, Festus Lihuhwa, Erik Kahare and Abiniel Nekandu during annual rhino operations in rhino custodian properties

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • We sent £1,500 received from Jim and Tammy Patton, and another £3,024.27 from them via matching funds from Apple, to be used to cover CEO Simson Uri-Khob’s expenses while at the Africa’s Protected Area Congress in Kigali, with the surplus to be used for rations for SRT’s trackers. Another £386.08 received in misc. restricted donations via our website was also sent to pay for rations for SRT’s trackers while out on patrol

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • $2,081.30 from core funds and $4,005.47 from the Woodtiger Fund paid for chopper hours during annual ear-notching operations in April 2022; and another $692.24 from Woodtiger paid for the drugs and darts needed to anesthetise the rhino. It’s important to be able to individually identify 1-2 year-old calves before they separate from their mothers, for future monitoring and genetic analysis of the health of the population, and to identify suitable candidates for establishing new populations elsewhere

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • We sent $2,818 awarded by our sister organization, Save the Rhino International Inc. (part of a total $9,899 grant) to help cover the cost of the rhino monitor’s (Joshua Rogers) salary for the last 2.5 months of 2022

African Rhino Specialist Group, Africa

  • Thanks to a grant from Save the Elephants, we sent $3,100 towards the production of Issue 63 of Pachyderm, the journal of the African Rhino and Elephant Specialist Groups and the Asian Rhino Specialist Group

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • The donors and fundraisers supporting the ForRangers initiative have enabled the renewal and expansion of our insurance cover for rangers working in Africa. A grant of £57,881.58 to the Game Rangers Association of Africa paid for life insurance for 1,757 rangers at field programmes in East and Southern Africa, from 1 July 2022 to 30 June 2023. Another $78,209.66 paid for a life insurance policy from 13 June 2022 to 12 June 2023 via Viva-365 to cover rangers working for the following organizations: Borana Conservancy, El Karama, Il Mamusi, Il’Ngwesi, Loisaba, Lolldaiga, Mara Elephant Project, Mt Kenya Trust, Mugie, Ngorare, Ol Jogi Conservancy, Ol Maisor, Ole Naishu, Segera, Sosian and Suyian in Kenya; Gashaka Gumti National Park in Nigeria; Big Life Foundation and Grumeti Reserve in Tanzania; and the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia. ForRangers’ fundraising efforts now protect a total of 3,263 rangers in 62 protected areas in 11 African countries: Angola, Botswana, Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, South Africa, Tanzania, Zambia and Zimbabwe

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • $19,260 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) through Project UPTICK paid for Borana’s rangers to undergo annual ‘Rhino Tactical Refresher Training’, delivered by 51 Degrees Ltd
  • $1,299.20 from INL paid for shared-asset training for Borana’s rangers during May 2022
  • $2,085.22 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for three of Borana’s senior National Police Reservists to undergo Commanders’ training during June 2022

Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya

  • We sent $4,698 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) via Project UPTICK for 3 refresher courses for KWS staff in national parks’ Ops Rooms on the use of EarthRangerTM, together with another $802 for subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ staff while training KWS staff
  • $4,831.40 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for user refresher training for KWS staff in national parks’ Ops Rooms on the use of EarthRangerTM, and another $416 covered subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ staff while training KWS staff

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $15,536.40 from Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) paid for helicopter hours during ranger training courses (for staff from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa) held at Lewa during March 2022, through Project UPTICK
  • $8,184.96 from INL funds for ranger training: Advanced course for some of Lewa’s National Police Reservists (NPRs)
  • $1,299.20 from INL funds paid for shared-asset training for Lewa’s rangers during May 2022, via Project UPTICK
  • $2,780.29 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for four of Lewa’s senior National Police Reservists to undergo Commanders’ training during June 2022

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • A grant of $25,000 from the ForRangers initiative was awarded to pay for a new canteen for Ol Jogi’s rangers, and for 10 ‘rhino dinners’, at which the rangers choose names for calves born during the previous 12 months. Any surplus will go towards buying a mobile water bowser that can be towed behind a 4WD to deliver water to ranger outposts
  • $24,450.48 from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) paid for a Rhino tactical refresher course for Ol Jogi’s NPRs, and one of the rangers was sent on an Advanced course held at Ol Pejeta Conservancy
  • $1,299.20 from INL paid for shared-asset training for Ol Jogi’s rangers during May 2022
  • $2,085.22 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for three of Ol Jogi’s senior National Police Reservists to undergo Commanders’ training during June 2022

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • We sent £65 worth of 100 pin badges and 50 wrist bands, delivered by Darion & Jimmy during field site visit, to distribute to SRT’s own trackers and to the Rhino Rangers in the Kunene Region

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • We sent funds from a range of donors to pay for new lithium-ion batteries to replace the old deep-cycle ones used for solar-power systems in uMkhuze: £493.43 received in misc. donations via our website; €1,000 euros from Monde Sauvage Safari Parc; $1,850 raised by Shaini Hirawat via her “Aaryav Hirawat – Help me Save the Rhinos” campaign; $1,000 from The Bernard F. and Alva B. Gimbel Foundation; and £1,250 from West Midland Safari Park. The lithium-ion batteries are more expensive but are expected to last for c.10 years
  • We sent another $7,081 awarded by our sister organization, Save the Rhino International Inc. (part of a $9,899 grant) to help cover the cost of replacing deep-cycle batteries with lithium-ion batteries at ranger outposts
  • And we sent £5,000 received from the Betty Lawes Foundation towards the cost of 5kVa lithium-ion batteries for ranger camps @ ZAR 35,000 each plus ZAR 10,000 for installation. This is a critical need for the continued supply of power to remote field ranger camps, where the system was upgraded from an old, and now redundant, two-battery system to a state-of-the-art solar system that allows camps to run more efficiently on solar power and replace expensive LP gas systems. The initial system opted for the supply of 8 x 105 Ah deep-cycle batteries, since the lithium-ion batteries were too expensive for the funder at the time. However, these deep-cycle battery systems have a limited lifecycle of c. three years depending on the number of cycles, and they now need replacing. The proposed lithium-ion batteries are more expensive but have more capacity and a guarantee of 10 years, making them far more cost-effective

Rhino Resource Center, UK

  • We sent our annual grant of £1,000 from core funds towards the cost of the RRC’s website and uploading new rhino research publications. It is an excellent reference base, used by students, researchers and rhino conservation professionals alike

Rhino Fund Uganda

  • We awarded $13,000 from core funds to cover two months’ administrative costs for the RFU, while it rebrands, restructures, and develops a revised constitution and new Cooperation Agreement with Uganda Wildlife Authority, to enable RFU to create a new rhino sanctuary in Uganda

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • We used $6,653.88 from a Wildcat Foundation grant to pay for hotel nights for North Luangwa’s London Marathon team who will be competing in October 2022. These overseas trips are an important part of NLCP’s ranger welfare and incentives programme, encouraging and supporting physical fitness and rewarding those who have performed exceptionally well
  • We spent $2,232.95 from Wildcat Foundation funds to pay for further hotel nights for the NLCP London Marathon 2022 team in October 2022

Canine units, Africa

  • We paid $733.47 from a grant from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs (INL) to pay for airport transfers & transport to/from the venue for the detection and tracking demonstrations in Lusaka, during the K9 workshop in May 2022
  • We spent a total of $7,777,53 on international flights for 12 participants attending the K9 workshop in May 2022 in Lusaka, thanks to the INL grant
  • £65.22 worth of Save the Rhino T-shirts and pin badges were given out at the workshop held in Lusaka in May 2022. $9,402.64 from INL paid the balance for the venue costs (accommodation, food, conference facilities) for the K9 workshop. $3,082.41 from INL was paid to Natasha van Zyl: $2,880 for her consultancy fees to plan and deliver the workshop, and the remaining $202.41 for associated incidental expenses (stationery etc.). And finally we received a refund of $525.43 from a company that missed the pick-up for the transfer of participants back to Lusaka airport
  • We received a refund of $653.20 from Key Travel for a flight we had booked that no longer made the right connections and had to be rebooked; this was credited back to the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, which had originally paid for the flight

 

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • We used $1,021.17 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust to pay for the printing of Namibia’s White Rhino and Black Rhino Species Management Plans

Lowveld Rhino Trust, Zimbabwe

  • We paid £39.60 for the final tweaks to the layout and design of the Rhino Management Strategy for Zimbabwe 2020-2024. 100 hard copies are being printed and shipped to Zimbabwe for onwards distribution

African Rhino Specialist Group, Africa

  • We paid $300 from core funds for the registration fee for the AfRSG’s Scientific Officer, Sam Ferreira, to attend and participate in the IUCN Africa Protected Areas Congress (APAC), being held in July 2022 in Kigali, Rwanda. The AfRSG will be presenting a panel discussion entitled “Thriving people, thriving rhinos: Protected areas leveraging human and nature well-being”. Summary: Rhino conservation and benefits for people needs moving beyond sustainability as poaching degraded rhino status in the previous decade. Even so, rhinos under management other than pure-state performed best. It seems that devolving responsibility to local people may be a key requirement. At Laikipia in Kenya, planning aimed to foster a resilient socio-economic-ecological system conserved by an empowered civil society. Additional case studies elsewhere in Africa help set the context for reflection on the benefits of integrating conservation, human rights and responsibilities. A panel discussion focuses on key enabling requirements to meet the objective of thriving local people and rhinos. Another £270.90 from core funds paid for a return flight for Sam from Johannesburg to Kigali
  • Another $400 from core funds paid the registration fee for SRT’s CEO, Simson Uri-Khob, to attend and participate in APAC, and £632.70 from core funds paid for his return flights from Windhoek to Kigali
  • Finally, we sent $2,222.22 from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Limited to pay for catering costs associated with the AfRSG’s panel event at APAC

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • We sent grants from Molly Stewart (£1,000) and Spooner/Nelson (£2,000) for work in Mukugodo Forest, an area of community-owned forest that lies between Borana Conservancy and Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, and acts as an important wildlife corridor as well as providing ecosystem services for the community
  • We also sent £1,000 from Tara Ward in January 2022 for this year’s Days for Girls campaign, which aims to buy menstrual kits for girls in the villages neighbouring Borana so that they can continue to attend school uninterrupted
  • We sent $2,746.99 (from a larger grant awarded by our sister organization, Save the Rhino International Inc.) to reimburse consultant Richard Hennery for further costs relating to his visit to Borana in February: PCR test; internal transfers; and nine days’ consultancy fees for his input into the development of Borana’s new conservation education programme
  • £1,600 received from Tom and Alice Aubrey-Fletcher, and another £10 donated via our website, was sent to help pay for a teacher’s salary via the Borana Education Support Programme
  • We sent a grant of £16,000 received from the Rothes Charitable Trust for Lokusero Primary School, a boarding and day government school located in the Mukogodo Forest. The School is home to 370 students and 10 teachers, and current enrolment is from PP1 to Grade 8. Borana Conservancy has been supporting the School with the construction of classrooms, teachers’ salaries and student scholarships. In recent years, these standards have fallen behind, with significant investment going to the adjacent secondary school. Borana will address this by providing support in the form of fencing (to keep out shoats and elephants), water-storage tanks, rainwater-harvesting systems, an ablutions block and cooking stoves
  • $20,000 from Untamed Planet via WildArk, and another $10,000 from Illuminarium in partnership with WildArk, was sent to help cover the Year 1 costs of Mazingira Yetu. This Conservation Education Programme (CEP) has made incredible progress since 1 January 2022: a CE Officer and CE Assistant have been recruited, an Education Centre built, a special bus (the Mazingira Express) bought and adapted, and a curriculum developed with the assistance of consultant Richard Hennery and in consultation with local Headteachers and the Ministry of Education. The first group, from a local primary school, visited Borana on 29 July 2022

Grants during 2021-2022

Indian Rhino Vision RV2020, India

  • We sent €2,000 from Rotterdam Zoo for IRV2020, where our focus in recent years has been on supporting intelligence and investigations work to combat rhino poaching and support prosecutions

Rhino Protection Unit programme, Indonesia

  • We sent £325 received in misc. restricted donations to help pay for patrols by the Rhino Protection Units in Way Kambas NP on the island of Sumatra. Way Kambas is believed to have a viable population of Sumatran rhinos in the wild, as well as being home to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary. The RPUs look for signs of rhinos (dung, wallows, browsing etc.) as well as detecting any illegal activity, such as snaring or logging. Each RPU comprises three members of staff from YABI, and Indonesian NGO, and one member of staff from the Forest Department, who is armed
  • We sent another £4,500 received from an anonymous donor, plus £365 in misc. donations via our website, for RPU operations in Way Kambas NP, Sumatra

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • $2,170 from INL funds: $1,700 from INL for Project UPTICK: monthly (March) salary for the Intelligence Assistant, and again for his April salary, and $470 for three months of cellphone contract x two personnel. 51 Degrees Ltd supports conservancies throughout Laikipia and other wildlife-rich areas of Kenya by gathering and analysing intelligence and warning conservancies of poaching threats. Another $2,487.50 paid for board and lodging and internal transfers between Nairobi and three sites in Laikipia by 51 Degrees’ Intelligence Trainer, who visits Kenya three times a year
  • $1,700 from INL for Project UPTICK covered the monthly (May) salary for the Intelligence Assistant
  • $2,170 from INL funds paid for the monthly (June) salary for the Intelligence Assistant and $470 covered three months’ worth of cellphone contracts for two personnel
  • Another $4,985 from INL paid for the intelligence trainer’s international flights, internal transfers and subsistence and travel while in Kenya
  • $3,400 from INL funds for Project UPTICK paid the monthly (July and August) salary for the Intelligence Assistant
  • $6,890 from INL funds for Project UPTICK: $1,700 from INL for the monthly (September) salary for the Intelligence Assistant; $4,500 for the Intelligence Trainer;s consultancy fees; and and $690 for 3 months of cellphone contract x 2 personnel
  • $1,819 from INL for Project UPTICK: the monthly (October) salary for the Intelligence Assistant
  • $5,000 from For Rangers to Local Ocean Trust in Kenya to pay for 3 x night-time beach monitors’ salaries
  • $1,819 from INL for Project UPTICK paid the monthly (November) salary for the Intelligence Assistant
  • US2,509 from INL for Project UPTICK paid the monthly (December) salary for the Intelligence Assistant; and for three months of cellphone contract for two personnel
  • $1,819 from INL for Project UPTICK for the monthly (January 2022) salary for the Intelligence Assistant; and another $1,819 from INL for the monthly (February) salary

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • $4,700 from INL funds via Project UPTICK: $3,800 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $900 for helicopter patrols to detect and deter any potential threats, whether from poachers or livestock rustlers, during March and April 2021
  • $5,360 from INL funds: $5,000 for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during March and April 2021, and $360 for Source Handler training course expenses
  • $1,900 from INL funds paid for fixed-wing aerial surveillance during May 2021, and another $2,500 paid for monthly intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd
  • A £2,000 donation from Robert Devereux, and another £2,195 from misc. restricted donations received was sent to help cover general Conservancy operating costs
  • $4,610 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for aerial surveillance during June 2021: $1,900 fixed-wing and $2,710 helicopter, while another $2,500 paid for intelligence gathering and analysis support during June 2021
  • $4,846.40 from INL for Project UPTCIK paid for aerial surveillance during July 2021: $1,900 fixed-wing and $2,946.40 helicopter; and $2,500 from INL funds paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during July 2021
  • $4,000 from INL funds paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during August, and a site visit by the intelligence trainer; while another $3,822.40 from INL funds paid for aerial surveillance during August 2021: $2,500 towards fixed-wing hours and $1,322.40 for helicopter flying time
  • $2,500 for intelligence gathering and analysis during September 2021, thanks to INL
  • $9,510.56 from INL funds for aerial surveillance during September 2021: $1,575 for the fixed-wing and $7,935.56 for the helicopter
  • $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during October 2021, again from INL funds
  • $6,296.60 from INL funds for aerial surveillance during October 2021: $4,226 for the fixed-wing and $2,070.60 for helicopter hours
  • $6,039 from INL funds paid for fixed-wing aerial surveillance during November 2021
  • $2,675 paid for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd, again thanks to the US government’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • US2,675 from INL funds paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during December 2021, and US3,579 for paid for fixed-wing aerial surveillance during December 2021
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis during January 2022
  • $11,630.70 for aerial surveillance during January 2022: $4,148 for fixed-wing, and $7,482.70 for chopper time, thanks to funding from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • $5,901 from INL for fixed-wing aerial surveillance during February 2022
  • $4,280 from INL for intelligence work: US $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during February 2022 and $1,605 for Source Handler training

Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya

  • $13,456 from the US government’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs’ grant for Project UPTICK paid for IT support provided by 51 Degrees Ltd for the KWS Operations Room in Tsavo East National Park. The Ops Room is now equipped with hardware and software to support Earthranger™ that allows live situation analysis and facilitates the coordination of reactions
  • $6,728 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for IT support provided during June 2021by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRanger™
  • $6,728 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for IT support provided during July 2021 by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRanger™. Another $890 from INL funds paid for a new laptop for KWS staff at one of the eight regional headquarters being equipped with EarthRanger™ via Project UPTICK
  • $6,728 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for IT support provided during August 2021 by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRanger™. Another $5,237 paid for new laptops / desktops for KWS staff at HQ’s Command Centre, which is being equipped with EarthRanger™ via Project UPTICK
  • $9,400 from INL was used to equip the main KWS HQ with servers on which to run EarthRanger
  • $6,728 for IT support provided during September 2021 by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRanger, via the INL-funded Project UPTICK
  • $10,934.96 from INL for IT support and equipment for KWS to use EarthRanger
  • $3,834.96 from INL was used to pay for IT support provided during November 2021 by 51 Degrees Ltd regarding EarthRanger™
  • We awarded £1,846.96 from core funds to buy two Trovan microchip readers for the Kenya Wildlife Service. One will be allocated to the Veterinary Unit and the other to the Investigations Unit, to assist with the sampling of rhino horns and carcasses in order to get the DNA comparisons needed for improved investigations
  • $3,834.96 from INL for IT support provided during January 2022 by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRanger
  • $9,834.10 for IT support provided during February 2022 by 51 Degrees Ltd for KWS regarding EarthRanger, thanks to the INL-funded Project UPTICK

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $5,000 from INL funds via Project UPTICK paid for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during March and April 2021
  • $10,864 from INL paid for aerial surveillance during March and April 2021: $2,584 for fixed-wing; and $8,280 for helicopter patrols
  • $8,788 from INL funds: $1,900 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $6,888 for helicopter patrols; and another $2,500 for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during May 2021
  • €500 euros from Rotterdam Zoo was allocated towards Lewa’s canine unit, which is ably managed by Joseph Piroris
  • $13,742 from INL via Project UPTICJ paid for aerial surveillance and shared-asset training during June 2021: $2,174 fixed-wing and $11,568 helicopter. Another $4,000 for intelligence support covered $2,500 for intelligence gathering and analysis support during June 2021, and $1,500 for a site visit and training
  • $14,212 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for aerial surveillance during July 2021: $2,128 fixed-wing and $12,084 helicopter. Another $2,500 covered intelligence gathering and analysis
  • $4,000 from INL funds paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during August 2021, as well as a site visit by the Intelligence Trainer. $4,815.64 from INL funds paid for aerial surveillance during August 2021: $570.24 fixed-wing aerial surveillance; $1,322.40 helicopter aerial surveillance; and $2,923 chopper use during ranger training course Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • $2,500 for intelligence gathering and analysis during September 2021, via the INL-funded Project UPTICK
  • $11,209.20 from INL funds for aerial surveillance during September 2021: $316.80 fixed-wing and $10,892.40 helicopter (included chopper use during ranger training exercises)
  • $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during October 2021 (INL funds)
  • $14,006.66 from INL funds for aerial surveillance during October 2021: $3,016.06 fixed-wing and $10,990.60 helicopter (included chopper use during ranger training exercises)
  • $17,595.08 from INL funds for Project UPTICK paid for aerial surveillance during November 2021: $1,545.08 fixed-wing and $16,050 chopper
  • $2,675, also from INL, paid for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during November 2021
  • US13,437.42 from INL paid for aerial surveillance during December 2021: $2,009.82 for fixed-wing; and $11,427.60 for chopper hours. Another US2,675 paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during December 2021
  • $2,675 from INL for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during January 2022
  • $5,576.84 for aerial surveillance during January 2022: $569.24 for fixed-wing; and $5,007.60 for chopper time, thanks to funding from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • $11,363.40 from INL for aerial surveillance during February 2022: $1,219.80 for fixed-wing; and $10,143.60 for chopper time
  • $4,536.80 from INL for intelligence work: US $2,675 for intelligence gathering and analysis during February 2022; $1,605 for a site visit; and $256.80 for the costs of Source Handler training

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $505.73 from INL funds reimbursed Ol Jogi for the transport of uniform items (bought in the UK) from Nairobi to Borana
  • $6,040 from INL funds via Project UPTICK: $5,000 for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during March and April 2021; $1,500 for onsite visit and training by the Intelligence Trainer; and $540 incurred in course expenses for Source Handler training
  • $6,719.50 from INL funds: $1,900 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $4,819.50 for helicopter patrols during March 2021
  • Another $6,660 from INL funds: $1,900 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $4760 for helicopter patrols during April 2021
  • $6,660 from INL funds: $1,900 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance and $4,760 for helicopter patrols during May 2021
  • $509.74 from INL funds to reimburse Ol Jogi for the transport of rangers’ equipment items shipped from the UK from Nairobi to Borana for onwards distribution
  • $2,500 for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during May 2021, thanks to the grant from the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • €500 euros from Rotterdam Zoo and €786.27 euros from Fondation Lutreola (Tallinn Zoo) was sent to help cover the costs of Ol Jogi’s canine unit
  • INL funds via Project UPTICK enabled grants of: $6,660 for aerial surveillance during June 2021 ($1,900 fixed-wing and $4,760 helicopter); and $2,900 for intelligence gathering and analysis during June 2021 ($2,500 for monthly support and $400 for training course expenses)
  • Another $284.55 remaining from a donation by Bradley and Kristen Garlinghouse was sent to help cover Conservancy operating costs
  • $6,731.40 from INL funds for Project UPTICK paid for aerial surveillance during July 2021: $1,900 fixed-wing and $4,831.40 helicopter. Another $2,500 covered intelligence gathering and analysis during July 2021
  • $9,202.20 from INL paid for aerial surveillance during August 2021: $1,900 fixed-wing and $7,302 helicopter flying time. Another $4,000 supported the costs of intelligence gathering and analysis during August 2021, and a site visit by the Intelligence Trainer
  • $2,500 for intelligence gathering and analysis during September, and another $2,675 for October, via Project UPTICK funded by INL
  • $6,697.80 aerial surveillance during September 2021: $1,900 fixed-wing and $7,302 helicopter; and $975.84 for fixed-wing aerial surveillance during November 2021, thanks to the INL grant
  • $975.84 from INL paid for aerial surveillance during November 2021 (all fixed-wing)
  • $2,675 from INL paid for intelligence gathering and analysis during November 2021
  • US30,000 from US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Fund (part of total $78,557.35 grant) was awarded to help maintaining the Conservancy’s radio infrastructure. Another US15,208.55 will be used for security equipment: five x fence energizers @ $385 / unit; five x solar-power / batteries for the fence energizers; and four x thermal-imaging units
  • US2,675 from INL for Project UPTICK was sent to pay for intelligence gathering and analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during December 2021, and another US16,034.20 for aerial surveillance during December 2021: $2,033 for fixed-wing and $14,001.20 for chopper time
  • $2,033 from INL for fixed-wing aerial surveillance during January 2022
  • $4,280 for intelligence gathering and analysis during January 2022, together with a site visit to meet with Ol Jogi’s head of security and key personnel
  • $4,498 from INL for aerial surveillance during February 2022: $2,033 for fixed-wing; and $2,465 for chopper time
  • $2,675 from INL via for intelligence gathering & analysis by 51 Degrees Ltd during Feb 2022 Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • $1,617.28 from core funds and $25,845.63 from USFWS to pay for helicopter hire for dehorning operations in two of Namibia’s national parks, to reduce the risk of poaching in areas of high rhino density
  • $839.99 from USFWS funds to pay the Off-Road Center in Windhoek for new shock absorbers for the vehicles used in annual dehorning operations
  • $239.64 from USFWS to pay for Covid-19 tests for the SMART consultant travelling from Lusaka to Windhoek
  • $16,000 from USFWS to pay Invictus K9 for refresher training (12 weeks) of canines and handlers. The introduction of K9 units in Namibia has had a significant impact on arrests of poachers from hot scent trails and for searching vehicles at roadblocks
  • $20,000 from USFWS to pay Invictus K9 for refresher training (12 weeks) of canines and handlers, topped up with $633.07 from core funds
  • $1,010.15 from the Woodtiger Fund as a fuel advance for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used by MEFT personnel involved in annual dehorning operations (locations kept confidential)
  • $754.24 for fuel for the K9 unit vehicle, and for accommodation for two vets during upcoming dehorning operations (locations kept confidential), thanks to the Valerie G Merrin 2006 Trust
  • $1,825.38 from the Valerie G Merrin 2006 Trust for four drums of AvGas for upcoming dehorning operations
  • $68,109.80 from USFWS to pay for 66.8 hours of helicopter time for dehorning operations (location confidential), to reduce the risk of rhinos being poached for their horns
  • $1,955.68 from USFWS funds to pay for a service to the chopper used in dehorning operations during March 2022; and another $393.90 from USFWS to pay for accommodation and food for the mechanics servicing the helicopter

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • $3,500 from an anonymous donor was sent to help cover the work of SRT’s Wildlife Crime Coordinator, who works closely with colleagues in other agencies to gather and analyse intelligence from informers
  • $5,000 (part of a $40,000 grant from the Glen and Bobbie Ceiley Foundation) went towards payments to informers, whose information leads to the arrest of those involved in rhino-poaching / horn-trafficking

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • £2,740 received from misc. restricted donations to help cover infrastructure maintenance and repairs in the Park. The managing agency, Ezemvelo KZN Wildlife, has imposed budget freezes for several years, and Covid-19 has reduced income from park entry fees and tourism lodges, so all of the provincial state parks are in need of basic equipment
  • A total of €6,000, thanks to grants of €1,500 from Zoo de la Boissière du Doré; €4,000 euros from Parc de Lunaret – Zoo de Montpellier; and €500 from Parco Natura Viva (ARCA Foundation) will be used to help cover essential repairs and maintenance
  • And another $5,666 from The Bernard F. and Alva B. Gimbel Foundation will also be used to help cover the purchase of uniform and rations etc., as well as routine repairs and maintenance
  • €15,000 from Kiezebrink will be used procure new thermal-imaging security cameras to monitor the fence perimeter and warn against any illegal incursions. This early detection system will enable rangers to respond quickly and proactively to illegal incursions, increasing their chances of successfully apprehending criminals before they have a chance to poach a rhino. In addition, Kiezebrink’s support will enable a solar energy system to be installed to power each camera, and fencing to be erected to safeguard the new equipment against theft and damage from wildlife in the area
  • $10,112 from the Woodtiger Fund paid for six sets of tires for HiP’s patrol vehicles (one each for the five Sections plus the Reaction Unit). Another $2,171 from the Woodtiger Fund was sent to help cover the costs of vehicle maintenance for HiP’s patrol vehicles during the 6-month period July-December 2021
  • €500 euros from Parco Natura Viva (ARCA Foundation) was sent to pay for more camera traps, used to detect wildlife but also human incursions
  • US$34,656.08 from the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Fund (part of a $82,538.20 total grant) was sent to buy 88 tyres for the Park’s law enforcement vehicles and cover maintenance costs for three vehicles in Manzibomvu Section and three in Makhamisa Section, where much of the driving is offroad, and another $10,719.98 will be used to pay for small items of equipment to be repaired / replaced as necessary
  • €4,000 from Parc de Lunaret – Zoo de Montpellier, together with €1,500 from Zoo de la Boissière du Doré; and £1,508.19 received in miscellaneous donations via our website, to pay for thermal-imaging binoculars and an Infrared pointer, to be used from a helicopter during emergency responses

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • A second and final instalment of €25,000 from WILDLANDS Nature and Education Fund was awarded to help cover the costs of constructing a hangar for the light aeroplane to be deployed in uMkhuze to assist with aerial surveillance, Personal Pilot Licence training for two members of staff, a drone kit, electric vehicle for patrolling the fence line, binoculars and tyres for law enforcement vehicles x 3
  • £1,250 from West Midland Safari Park, £787 received in misc. donations via our website, and £213 from core funds was sent to uMkhuze to be allocated to the upgrade of its aircraft hangar: gutters and a 10 000-litre rainwater tank; i-Weather station Airfield Weather monitoring; IP link for security camera and weather-station monitoring; and CCTV camera with live feed
  • US$44,231 from Ardea Cares, plus a previous $17,400 received from Ardea Cares, originally intended for ranger training but now reallocated, was awarded for a project entitled “Security equipment to support uMkhuze’s law-enforcement operations”. uMkhuze aims to build up its technological law-enforcement capability, to act as a force-multiplier for its hard-pressed rangers. Specifically, the grant will help pay for 2 x repeater back-up systems for the Victron 3kVa systems, a Kestrel Dual Stream Optical software for the Forward Looking InfraRed (FLIR) Remote Monitoring System, FLIR PT 606 HD Camera, and an interactive 65″ screen Ardea Cares
  • These grants were supplemented with US$500 from The Bernard F. and Alva B. Gimbel Foundation; US$12,000 from Save the Rhino International Inc.; and €5,000 euros from Fondation le Pal Nature, which completed the funding needed for the surveillance equipment wish-list
  • US$8,072.75 from the US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Fund (part of a larger $67,006.14 total grant) was awarded to pay for five sets of new Landcruiser tyres

North Luangwa Conservation Project, Zambia

  • £31,984.68, including funds from the Estate of Betty Liebert, a legacy from Mat Thompson, from David Back’s memorial, misc. donations via our website, and those raised by the NLCP London Marathon team, were sent to pay for helicopter hours for aerial surveillance over North Luangwa National Park in the first quarter of 2022
  • $120,220.72 from Wildcat Foundation grant for law-enforcement equipment and anti-poaching operations, ranger salaries, bonuses and incentives, specialist and in-service training and vehicle running costs for North Luangwa National Park’s rangers, and towards a new aeroplane engine for aerial surveillance
  • Another $7,809.54 from Wildcat Foundation to pay fees for and expenses incurred by a trainer from Big 5 Protection, for Specialist tracking trainer course for REPU scouts in North Luangwa NP in November and December 2021
  • US$200,000 from the Wildcat Foundation grant was sent to help pay for law-enforcement equipment and anti-poaching operations, ranger salaries, bonuses and incentives, specialist and in-service training and vehicle running costs for North Luangwa National Park’s rangers
  • $25,210.70 from Wildcat funds to pay for law-enforcement equipment for the Dept of National Parks and Wildlife scouts in North Luangwa National Park
  • $59,754.57 from the Wildcat Foundation grant for law-enforcement equipment and anti-poaching operations, ranger salaries, bonuses and incentives, specialist and in-service training, and for vehicle-running costs for North Luangwa National Park’s rangers

Wildlife Crime Prevention, Zambia

  • A grant of $27,000 from Save the Rhino International Inc. was sent to pay for investigations into traffickers operating between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda, which will enable government agencies to conduct successful law-enforcement operations in order to disrupt key trade routes, deter traffickers and reduce local demand

Follow the money investigation, Africa

  • ZAR 100,000 from Hleka Bafazi Holdings and ZAR 35,688.50 from MalaMala Game Reserve (PTY) Ltd helped to pay for the costs of a follow-the-money investigation into a major rhino-poaching syndicate
  • £28,706.57 was used to pay for work during the period April-September 2021 on a follow-the-money investigation into a major rhino-poaching syndicate, which is being funded by the UK Government through the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund
  • £73,255.41 was used to pay for work during the period October to December 2021 inclusive, on a follow-the-money investigation into a major rhino-poaching syndicate, which is being funded by the UK Government through the Illegal Wildlife Trade Challenge Fund

Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area, Indonesia

  • We sent £310 received in misc. restricted donations to help cover the costs of Arenga palm eradication in Ujung Kulon NP, on the island of Java, Indonesia. Javan rhino numbers are now up to 75, following the birth in 2021 of four calves to date, and the death of three animals (natural mortalities). For Javan rhino numbers to continue to grow, and in the absence of an agreed plan to create a second, secure habitat in which to introduce a founder population, it is essential that the Ecological Carrying Capacity of Ujung Kulon NP is maximised. Arenga palm is an invasive species, which is not eaten by Javan rhinos, and there has been a real problem with Arenga palm forcing out native plants that are in Javan rhinos’ diets
  • Another £225.00 received in misc. donations via our website also went to Arenga palm eradication in Ujung Kulon NP, Java

Rhino Protection Unit programme, Indonesia

  • A grant of $10,500 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation was awarded for the reafforestation programme adjacent to Way Kambas National Park in Sumatra. Our implementing partner, the International Rhino Foundation, and Park authorities are working in partnership with local communities on this innovative conservation programme that will benefit Sumatran wildlife, and the people that share their habitat for years to come. Together, by reforesting two large plots of degraded land within Way Kambas National Park, we are creating new habitat for Sumatran rhinos and generating income in surrounding villages. Local farmers’ groups are employed to grow seedlings and people with disabilities are given income opportunities to plant seedlings, trim invasive species and maintain the new growth areas by hand. Local schools and scout troops are rolling up their sleeves as well. On visits to the sites, the children learn about the plants that rhinos like to eat and plant seedlings in the nursery to grow and be replanted, recovering more of the rainforest
  • Another $12,000 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation to pay for satellite phones and radio telecommunications for the operational needs of the patrol teams in Gunung Leuser NP in northern Sumatra

Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, Indonesia

  • We sent several grants towards the ongoing operating costs of the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary, based in Way Kambas NP in Sumatra, where the conservation breeding efforts are underway with a handful of Sumatran rhinos. The SRS has seen the births of Andatu in 2012 and Delilah in 2016, the only births to date of Sumatran rhinos in captivity apart from the three at Cincinnati Zoo in the first decade of the 21st Our thanks to the Simon Gibson Charitable Trust, which awarded £5,000; to Speake Marin that donated £4,628.20 from the sale of a particular watch design; and to other donors who gave £629.85 in misc. restricted donations for the ongoing running costs of the SRS
  • £1,250 from West Midland Safari Park and another £362.77 in misc. donations via our website were sent to help cover the SRS’s running costs

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • $5,014 from the Bently Foundation’s grant and $696 from core funds was awarded to Conservation Alpha to help the Kenya Wildlife Service clean up historical rhino-sighting data from rhino sites (national parks and private and community conservancies) across Kenya. It is now possible to generate a full historic analysis of Kenya’s entire black rhino population performance, initially on a site-by-site basis, and eventually at national meta-population level. For example, site managers will be able to finally answer biological questions like “Do we lose more calves to predation than we expect”, and “Do we have density dependence in all or only some sanctuaries”, in other words, “What biological management actions do we need to take?”

Big Life Foundation, Kenya

  • $2,000 from the WildAid grant of $50,000, a continuation of the APLRS Core Critical Operating Costs appeal, was allocated to rhino monitors’ salaries. There is a small remnant population of Eastern black rhinos in the Chyulu Hills National Park and adjacent Mbirikani Group Ranch, which is monitored and protected by Big Life Foundation

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • We sent £878.35 from APLRS Emergency Fund to pay for the immobilization (helicopter, vet and drugs) of an injured male black rhino to evaluate the extent of his injuries following fights with a dominant male. Unfortunately, the injured bull had to be euthanized as his foreleg was found to have a complete fracture
  • $30,000 received from the Holtzman Wildlife Foundation, the second instalment of a 2-year grant totalling $60,000) was sent for the water reticulation project, which aims to expand the area used by Borana’s growing black rhino population. The provision of additional water sources has already resulted in rhinos moving into areas that were previously under-utilized
  • $5,000 from the Taliaferro Family Fund was sent to help cover general rhino monitoring costs on Borana
  • $10,000 from Tom and Molly Bedell was also sent to help pay for rhino monitoring and Conservancy running costs. One of Borana’s black rhinos, Kai Suen, has been named in honour of their son, Ren Suen Bedasbad
  • $3,275 from the WildAid grant totalling $50,000, for the continued APLRS CCOC Appeal, was allocated to Borana to help cover the cost of rhino monitors’ salaries
  • $10,000 from Lou DeLisser was sent to help cover general Conservancy operating costs
  • $39,960 from USFWS’s Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Fund (part of a $60,460 total grant) was sent to help cover the cost of Borana’s rhino monitors’ salaries. Another $5,500 from USFWS paid for the purchase of 10 x SMART camera traps to monitor wildlife movement and/or detect any human incursions; and $15,000 will be used to pay for repairs to one of Borana’s dams: Sieku dam. Maintaining water provision across the Conservancy is crucial in allowing rhinos and other wildlife to disperse across the entire landscape and ease density-dependence issues

Il Ngwesi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $2,000 from the WildAid grant totalling $50,000, for the continued APLRS CCOC Appeal, was allocated to Il Ngwesi to help cover the cost of rhino monitors’ salaries

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $13,546 from the WildAid grant of $50,000 for the continued APLRS CCOC Appeal was allocated to Lewa to help cover the cost of rhino monitors’ salaries
  • $16,022 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust was awarded to buy camera traps, rechargeable batteries, SD cards and binoculars, to support Lewa’s rhino monitoring effort
  • $39,320 from USFWS’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund (from a total grant of $71,702.21) was allocated towards the cost of Lewa’s rhino monitors’ salaries ($33,960). $3,360 will pay for 12 pairs of binoculars (11 monitoring blocks and the supervisor). $2,000 will pay for annual in-house refresher training for rhino monitors and update of Master ID files across the Lewa-Borana Landscape: 5 days @ $400 / day for food and associated costs. And $3,547.25 will pay for the repair of Dam ya mama repair, including the cost of the bulldozer, diesel, delivery of the bulldozer to the site and back, and subsistence for the driver

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $48,000 from Year 2 of a USFWS grant will buy a new vehicle, plus necessary bush modifications, for Ol Jogi’s rhino monitoring teams; while another $32,973 was awarded for water reticulation to improve the water supply for the Conservancy’s wildlife and rangers: Island Dam at HQ; Msitu ya Simba at Simba Trough; and T12 at HQ
  • $280 from APLRS Emergency Fund was used to reimburse Ol Jogi for 50% of the cost involved in treated a black rhino cow that had a suspected dislocated hip. She was immobilized, radio-graphed and treated with antibiotics and pain medication, and subsequently made a full recovery
  • $8,336 from the WildAid grant of $50,000 for the APLRS CCOC Appeal was sent to help cover rhino monitors’ salaries
  • A series of payments were made from a grant of $29,981 by the National Geographic Society for a research project: a study regarding the incidence of developed cataracts and significant visual impairment in Eastern black rhinos in Kenya. The field research will establish normal anatomy of the black rhino eye, and detect and classify ocular pathology in a wild population. By establishing whether cataracts are heritable and detecting associated genetic variants, the findings will help to inform management strategies for rhino in Kenya. $4,083.03 paid for 1 x TonoVet Probe and 2 x Tonometer Plus; and $3,711.16 reimbursed Dr Eleanor Milne for expenses related to the project: flights, fit-to-fly PCR tests and eVisas x 2, travel insurance x 1, and various equipment items (inc. ophthalmoscope, ultrasound gel, blood tubes, external hard drives, batteries, marker pens, and iPhone 6 refurbishment for panoptic photos
  • €5,000 euros from Erlebnis Zoo Hannover was sent to Ol Jogi to help cover the expansion of the Conservancy’s LoRaWAN project
  • $1,895.24 from USFWS (part of a total $78,557.35 grant) will be used to buy a new motorbike for the rhino monitoring unit. Motorbikes are much cheaper to run and maintain, and are an effective way for getting rangers to the right spot quickly

Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya

  • $13,843 from the WildAid grant of $50,000 for the APLRS CCOC Appeal was sent to help cover rhino monitors’ salaries

Sera Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $2,000 from the WildAid grant totalling $50,000, for the continued APLRS CCOC Appeal, was allocated to Sera to help cover the cost of rhino monitors’ salaries

Ministry of Environment, Forestry and Tourism, Namibia

  • $10,298.84 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust paid for a solar pump and accessories to provide 40,000 litres / day, from a depth of 83m, for a waterhole in Khaudum NP; and another $2,838.19 from the Trust paid for additional hire fees for the 6×6 and flatbed trucks used during rhino translocations carried out to relieve pressure on Ecological Carrying Capacity
  • $743.83 was advanced from the Woodtiger Fund’s 2-year grant to Chief Conservation Scientist and National Rhino Coordinator Piet Beytell for fuel for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used in rhino translocations taking place in mid-June
  • $1,873.50 from the Woodtiger Fund paid for six new tyres for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle, while another $114.74 from the Valerie G. Merrin 2006 Trust paid for repairs to the RRV’s air-to-ground radio
  • $1,056.43 from the Woodtiger Fund was sent to Piet Beytell for fuel for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used in rhino translocations. Piet was driving during operations in August and September . Another $5,358.83 from Woodtiger Fund paid for six new tyres for one of the 6×6 rhino-capture trucks
  • $1,208.46 from USFWS funds paid for batteries for SMART devices being used in Waterberg Plateau Park
  • $999.39 from The Woodtiger Fund was sent as an advance to Chief Conservation Scientist, Piet Beytell, for fuel used during annual rhino operations
  • $1,202.60 from a USFWS grant was used to pay for hosting services for the Shiny app to support wildlife monitoring
  • Another $6,172.25 from USFWS paid for consultant services for predictive modelling of poaching hotspots
  • $961.51 from The Woodtiger Fund was sent as a fuel advance for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used in annual rhino operations; another $2,282.07 paid for maintenance for the Astra truck used during rhino ops; and $127.38 paid for maintenance for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle
  • $33,382 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust paid for: purchasing and positioning 20 x remote camera traps in Nyae Nyae Conservancy (home to black and white rhinos); providing rhino-sighting equipment and incentives; introducing SMART to Nyae Nyae Conservancy; and providing oversight (by staff from Save the Rhino Trust) for Nyae Nyae’s rhino monitoring effort
  • $64.17 from the Woodtiger Fund to pay for branding decals for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle; another $62.71 to pay for repairs to the canopy on the back of the RRV; and a further $712.17 from Woodtiger to pay for general repairs to the RRV
  • $1,022.91 from Woodtiger res funds to act as a fuel advance to Piet Beytell for the Rhino Recovery Vehicle used in annual rhino operations
  • And $1,697.51 from USFWS funds to pay for 6 SMART tracking devices

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • A series of grants helped pay for rations for Save the Rhino Trust’s own trackers and for the Rhino Rangers from community conservancies on which the Kunene Region’s population of desert-adapted black rhinos are found: $9,070 from core funds; £2,564.47 from misc. restricted donations received via our website and SRT’s own justgiving.com page; $10,000 from USFWS; and €2,000 from Zoo Krefeld
  • USFWS also awarded $41,200 (from a total USFWS grant of $90,700) to pay salaries of SRT’s trackers based at Mai Go Ha! and of the Principal Field Officer #2 (Martin); and $39,500 to help pay for vehicle running costs
  • £9,000 from long-standing supporter Ales Weiner was sent to Save the Rhino Trust: a third will be used to buy new vehicle tyres (the huge distances and rough terrain in the Kunene Region’s 25,000km2 take a heavy toll on SRT’s vehicles); one third on rations for SRT’s own trackers and for the Rhino Rangers from the communal conservancies with which SRT works closely; and the final third on camping equipment for SRT’s trackers, e.g. tents
  • €3,000 euros from Bioparc Conservation (Bioparc de Doué-la-Fontaine) was allocated to the new mounted patrol unit. SRT has invested in a team of mules, which are well suited to patrolling the rocky and arid terrain of the Kunene Region in search of the elusive black rhino population
  • A series of grants totalling £8,764.22 was allocated to help cover the cost of SRT’s mule patrol team during the calendar year 2022: £137.99 received in misc. donations via our website; another £5,626.23 (inc. £5,000 raised / donated by Berry White) for the operating costs of the mule patrol; and a £3,000 grant from the Marjorie Coote Animal Charities Fund
  • $35,000 (part of a $40,000 grant) from the Glen and Bobbie Ceiley Foundation was also allocated to the operating costs of the mounted patrol unit. $22,903 will help cover the salary of the Mounted unit Project Manager; and $12,097 will help cover his vehicle fuel and running costs
  • $500 from Christina Lui was sent to support the vehicle running costs for the mounted unit Project Leader
  • $95,192 from US Fish and Wildlife Service’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund was awarded for the following: $46,960 on trackers’ salaries – SRT’s trackers will work on this project 12 months per year. There are 28 trackers at the main base, Maigoha! and 9 more at other bases, i.e. 37 in total. USFWS funds will cover the salaries of eight of SRT’s trackers for one year; $8,232 on rations – SRT provides rations for its own staff patrols (10 per month) and Rhino Rangers’ patrols (14 per month) = 24 patrols / month. Each patrol receives dry goods totalling $215 and a goat @ $128 = $343 / patrol, so USFWS funds will cover one month of rations; and $40,000 on vehicle running costs – SRT has 13 vehicles that are used by staff to deploy into the field, for staff welfare trips for food shopping & hospital visit, and for general administration purposes in Swakopmund
  • $25,000 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust will be used for the operating costs of a new mounted (mule) patrol unit to enable SRT to increase its patrol coverage of remote, poaching-hotspot areas. The grant will help cover the cost of the salary of the Mounted Unit Project Manager, as well as the construction of waterhole and installation of a solar pump, and building materials for the construction of a remote field base at !Axab
  • £7,768.82 received in miscellaneous donations (including £7,158 from our Keep Rhinos Connected appeal) will be used to buy remote camera traps in Nyae Nyae Conservancy (home to black and white rhinos)
  • £1,425 donated from SRI’s core funds for rations for SRT’s trackers and the Rhino Rangers, as well as base camp repair and maintenance costs at Maigoha!
  • $10,000 from EJF Philanthropies (Kindy French) was allocated to: camping equipment for Nyae Nyae Conservancy’s rangers (five bedrolls and tents); a contribution to borehole drilling for the new mounted unit’s camp; a traditional authority exposure trip to see rhinos in the Kunene Region; Eroku security operations; and upgrades at Maigoha! camp
  • $500 from Christina Lui was allocated to upgrades to Maigoha! camp
  • £1,800 raised by Berry White via a cocktail part was sent to help pay for building / upgrading fly camps
  • A total of £5,700 (£2,350 from Camilla Warre, £500 from Anne Hearn, £1,000 from Duncan Macpherson, and £1,850 from Ness Buxton) was sent to pay for rations for SRT’s trackers and the Rhino Rangers, as well as base camp repair and maintenance costs at Maigoha!; supplemented by an additional £311 received in miscellaneous donations via our website

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • $516.02 from the Woodtiger Fund paid for 80 x Trovan microchips, to be inserted into rhinos and horns during annual ear-notching operations in HiP in October 2021. Another $275.81 paid for Naltrexone and Hyaluronidase powder to be used during the annual operations in HiP. $903.05 from Woodtiger Fund was used to pay for drugs and darts for the operations. And we sent $42,239 from the Woodtiger Fund for a new Massey Ferguson 2640 4WD, which will be used for habitat management in HiP, clearing the fence line, etc.
  • $8,468.44 from the Woodtiger Fund paid Heligistics for chopper hours used during annual ear-notching operations carried out in October 2021. Another $1,702.96 paid KZN Nature Conservation Services for 15.2 hours of the use of the spotter plane during annual ear-notching operations
  • $13,500 from SRI Inc.’s core funds was sent to pay for the salary and vehicle running costs of HiP’s rhino monitor during the calendar year 2022
  • $486.01 from Woodtiger funds was used to pay for 75 x Trovan transponders and postage, for the rhino ear-notching operations scheduled for April / May 2022

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • We sent €3,000 (€2,000 from rhino’s energy and €1,000 from Zoom Torino to be used for rhino monitoring in uMkhuze, either for the rhino monitor’s salary or for 2021 ear-notching operations, as decided by uMkhuze’s Conservation Manager
  • Another €2,670 from the Association Française des Parcs Zoologiques and €5,000 euros from Fondation le PAL Nature, was allocated to help cover the rhino monitor’s (Joshua Rogers) salary during calendar year 2022

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • £24,600 from Peter and Birgit Lawrence was sent to NLCP for emergency rhino operations; any funds not used will be allocated to helicopter hours for aerial surveillance of North Luangwa National Park and its surrounding Game Management Areas

Lowveld Rhino Trust, Zimbabwe

  • We sent €2,544.03 (€2,000 from a grant from Dublin Zoo, the rest from core funds) to the Lowveld Rhino Trust to pay for the costs of updating LRT’s rhino monitoring database during the period September 2020 to May 2021 inclusive. LRT is responsible for monitoring the large black and white rhino populations in Bubye Valley Conservancy

Environmental Investigation Agency, UK

  • We sent a series of grants to pay for a ‘Changing China’ project run by the EIA to strengthen legal and policy frameworks in China: $2,770.25 from Ardea Cares; £3,000 from the Marjorie Coote Animal Charities Fund; £5,000 from the Samuel Storey Family Charitable Trust; and $10,500 from The Scott & Jessica McClintock Foundation. This is year two of the project, which will advocate for the adoption of a new State Council order and/or amendments to China’s wildlife laws; to encourage and amplify diverse voices calling for an end to the trade in threatened wildlife; and to undertake research and produce analysis to support policy recommendations

African Rhino Specialist Group, Africa

  • $12,590 from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Ltd funds towards the production of issue # 62 of Pachyderm, the journal of the African Elephant, the African Rhino, and the Asian Rhino Specialist Groups of the IUCN Species Survival Commission (SSC). Issue # 62 can be read online at https://pachydermjournal.org/index.php/pachyderm/issue/view/21
  • £1,000 from core funds towards the production of issue # 63; plus $10,900 from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Ltd funds towards the production of issue # 63 of Pachyderm, the Journal of the African Elephant, African Rhino and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups

Canine unit project, Africa

  • $134.88 from INL funds for enhanced DropBox storage for the K9 group. When the canine unit workshop planned for May 2020 in Lusaka had to be cancelled, we introduced webinars / training sessions every 6-8 weeks to maintain learning and the sharing of skills and experience between dog handlers across sub-Saharan Africa. Resources are shared via DropBox

Virunga Foundation, Democratic Republic of Congo

  • $10,080 from For Rangers funds was awarded to pay for rations for 6 months x 30 rangers @ $56pppm for rangers working in Mt Tshiaberimu to protect its critically endangered population of Eastern lowland gorilla

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • $3,460.79 from INL funds for Project UPTICK paid for shipping costs of 564 x Camelbaks and 24 x medical kit items from the UK to Kenya, £136.06 from INL funds paid for the delivery to Save the Rhino’s London office of trauma bandages for the patrol medic kits; all items were being consolidated there before being shipped to Kenya. Finally, $1,167.66 (from INL funds to paid for the shipping of a total of 738 items of patrol medic kit from the UK to Kenya, destined for the trained Patrol Medics employed by Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies
  • Another $1,350 from INL paid for 3 x training instructor days to write up training course reports / assessments of rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies
  • $29,752.48 from INL paid the 25% balance on the uniform order placed just before Christmas. All items were delivered to Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies in April for distribution (at six-monthly intervals) to their National Police Reservists and general security rangers
  • $1,350 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for 3 x training instructor days to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi and Borana
  • $450 from INL for Project UPTICK for 1 x training instructor day to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa
  • $6,211.15 from INL to pay for the cost of shipping military-style leather boots from the UK to Kenya, for onwards distribution to security-focused rangers working in Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies
  • £42,710.30 from funds raised by the For Rangers initiative for renewal of the life insurance policy for 1,300 rangers working at conservancies in Kenya, Nigeria, Tanzania and Zambia, 22 June 2021 to 21 June 2022. The goal is to expand the reach in future years to cover 2,000 rangers across sub-Saharan Africa
  • $900 from INL funds for Project UPTICK paid for 2 x training instructor days to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies
  • $450 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for 1 x training instructor day to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa
  • $5,000 from For Rangers funds was awarded to pay for upgraded facilities at the James Ashe Antivenom Trust’s snake farm, so that they can deliver training onsite and host two students at a time
  • Another $5,000 from For Rangers funds went to the Mount Kenya Trust to pay for 4 x Garmin GPSs, 1 x satellite phone & airtime, 2 x uniforms, ranger counselling, firefighting training facilitation, financial literacy training & planning for rangers, and 2 x 4-day lifesaver courses
  • $11,100 from the INL grant for Project UPTICK paid for the production of 302 protective sleeves for Camelbak water bladders for rangers at Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies
  • $900 from INL for Project UPTICK for 2 x training instructor days to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies
  • $137,000 from For Rangers was sent to pay for a 2-year ranger training programme across Lolldaiga, Ole Naishu, Mugie, Sosian and Suyian conservancies. It is hoped that, eventually, some of these will become rhino guardians, to expand the rhino range across the Laikipia landscape
  • Another $5,690.49 from For Rangers for Christmas rations for conservancies in Laikipia, Kenya: tea leaves, sugar, long-grain rice, maize meal flour, baking flour, cooking fat x 1,095 units & soap x 2,190 units
  • $1,444.50 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for three days by 51 Degrees Ltd’s training instructor days to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa
  • $1,926 from INL for Project UPTICK for 4 x training instructor days to write up training course reports / assessments on rangers from Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa
  • $7,004.45 from ForRangers’ funds was awarded to Rhino Ark in Kenya for personal gear and camping equipment for deep-forest-enforcement operations: 15 x gum boots, raincoats, gloves, jungle boots, head gear, backpacks and sleeping bags; 6 x 3-man tents; 3 x 1-man tents; 6 portable stoves and gas cartridges; 3 First Aid kits; and 7 rechargeable torches
  • $17,005.62 from ForRangers’s funds was granted to El Karama Wildlife Conservancy to pay for a security base at the Northern entrance. The base will consist of a control room, two double bedrooms, a kitchen, and a toilet / shower room, all with a veranda. A rainwater tank and solar-power system will be included, as well as the existing radio base set. These buildings will be constructed by local builders using locally available materials, and be designed with a low profile to blend with the surrounding landscape. A perimeter fence will enhance security and protect trees

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • $34,233.92 from INL funds via Project UPTICK paid for ranger training as follows: $10,913.28 for Basic training; $3,183.04 for Patrol Medic training; and $20,137.60 for Rhino Tactical Refresher training
  • Another $8,184.96 from INL funds paid for an Advanced training course for some of Borana’s security-focused rangers in May 2021
  • $3,377.92 from INL paid for ranger training during June 2021: $2,598.40 for the Commanders’ training course (4 pax); and $779.52 for the Senior Commanders’ course (2 pax)
  • $17,539.20 from INL funds paid for Borana’s rangers to undergo a rhino training course
  • $15,000 from For Rangers funds was awarded to pay for accommodation upgrade at Bravo Golf. Currently three female rangers are posted at Bravo Golf, which has four dome-shaped rooms at the base. Three of these are used for accommodation. The remaining room is the radio room where equipment is also stored; it is also used as a common area and is where they watch TV in the evenings. There is one bathroom and one toilet outside, these are both in good condition and need no modification or upgrade. Borana would like to build five new rooms at this base: three of these rooms would be for accommodation; one for a common room; and the remaining room a kitchen
  • $25,506 from For Rangers was awarded to pay for the following: $13,618 to help cover the cost of a new 8-room accommodation block for rangers based at Borana’s HQ (the rest is being covered by the Anna Merz Rhino Trust); and $11,888 to pay for a fence around the football pitch to keep animals out, a new murramed basketball court, a roof over the High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) gym, and some HIIT training by a local firm based in Nanyuki, to improve the rangers’ fitness and strength and help improve morale within the team
  • The ForRangers’ grant was supplemented by $15,000 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust to pay for the construction of the additional 8-person accommodation block with bathrooms, adjacent to the National Police Reservists’ (NPR) base, for rangers and NPR, who are currently having to share accommodation
  • $8,444.80 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for ranger training during Dec 2021: $1,948.80 for Commanders’ training; and $6,496 for the Rhino tactical refresher training
  • $3,637.76 from INL funds for patrol medic training

Il Ngwesi Conservancy, Kenya

  • For Rangers awarded $6,600 to pay for materials (corrugated iron, timber, stone and labour costs) to upgrade 10 rangers’ houses, 1 ablutions block and install solar power, prior to the inbound translocation of more rhinos to the Conservancy. The improved facilities will greatly improve ranger morale

Kenya Wildlife Service, Kenya

  • $11,600 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for 2 x training courses (User basic and Management basic) for KWS staff on the use of EarthRanger. And $1,032 covered the cost of subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ staff while training KWS staff at regional headquarters
  • $11,600 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for 2 x training courses (User basic and Management basic) for KWS staff on the use of EarthRangerTM. Another $864 covered subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ staff while training KWS staff at regional headquarters. And a further $7,056 from INL paid for 2 x training courses (User basic and Management basic) for KWS staff on the use of EarthRangerTM in another regional HQ
  • $13,920 from INL for Project UPTICK paid for two refresher training courses (User basic and Management basic) for KWS staff at HQ on the use of EarthRangerTM; for training on EarthRangerTM at a regional centre; and for IT support for installations across Kenya. Another $384 covered subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ staff while training KWS staff at regional headquarters
  • $4,980 in February 2022 from INL for Project UPTICK: $4,698 for 2 x refresher training courses (User basic and Management basic) for KWS staff; and US $282 for subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ staff while training KWS staff Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs
  • $3,266.90 from INL for Project UPTICK: $2,349 for a User basic refresher training course for KWS staff; and $917.90 for subsistence and travel costs incurred by 51 Degrees’ staff while training KWS staff during March 2022

Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Kenya

  • $3,767.68 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for ranger training during June 2021: $2,598.40 for the Commanders’ training course (4 pax); and $1,169.28 for the Senior Commanders’ course (3 pax)
  • $3,792 from INL paid for helicopter hours during ranger training exercises held during July 2021. Another $17,400 from INL funds covered the cost of Lewa’s rangers undergoing a rhino training course to keep field skills sharp
  • $15,990 from For Rangers funds paid for 36 x tracksuits, sleeping bags and ponchos for the Anti-Poaching Unit, and for 1 x solar power installation and 82 pairs of trainers and tracksuits for Lewa’s rhino monitors
  • $25,320 from For Rangers was awarded to Lewa: $12,990 for equipment for the Anti-Poaching Unit (tracksuits, trainers, sleeping bags, bedrolls and mosquito nets, as well as 15 solar panels to charge radios); and $12,330 for equipment for general security rangers (tracksuits, trainers, sleeping bags, bedrolls and mosquito nets, a solar-power installation at an outpost, and 30 x lockable storage boxes)
  • $15,200 from USFWS’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund (from a total grant of $71,702.21) will pay for the installation of solar-power in four ranger outposts @ $3,800 / outpost. $13,634.96 from USFWS will be put towards uniforms. Each of the 82 rangers (general security & rhino monitors) will receive two green shirts, two pairs of green trousers, one green jumper, one green heavy padded jacket and five pairs of socks
  • $9,094.40 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for ranger training: $6,496 for the Rhino tactical refresher course; and $2,598.40 for Commanders’ training
  • $3,637.76 from INL funds for patrol medic training
  • Another $20,484.09 from Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs paid for ranger training: $20,157.09 for Lewa’s rangers to undergo a rhino tactical refresher training course; and $327 for food for the patrol medics’ training course

Ol Jogi Conservancy, Kenya

  • $20,137.60 from INL funds via Project UPTICK paid for Rhino Tactical Refresher training for Ol Jogi’s security-focused rangers
  • $5,456.64 from INL funds paid for some of Ol Jogi’s security-focused rangers to undergo an Advanced training course in May 2021
  • $3,767.68 from INL via Project UPTICK paid for ranger training during June 2021: $2,598.40 for the Commanders’ training course (4 pax); and $1,169.28 for the Senior Commanders’ course (3 pax)
  • $10,500 from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation was sent to Ol Jogi to be used to upgrade ranger housing, i.e. to repair where possible or to build new accommodation and ablution blocks for Ol Jogi’s ranger force. Providing comfortable living conditions while on duty is key to maintaining ranger morale
  • $19,488 from INL funds paid for a ‘Rhino tactical refresher’ training course for Ol Jogi’s rangers
  • $497.31 from INL reimbursed Ol Jogi for the cost of transporting UK-sourced and -shipped rangers’ boots from Nairobi to Ol Jogi for onwards distribution to Ol Jogi, Borana and Lewa Wildlife Conservancies
  • $15,000 from For Rangers’ funds was sent to pay for: $2,000 for Altberg Boots for 11 rangers who did not recently receive the same; $5,000 for rations for the 103 rangers for four months ending 31 December 2021; $3,000 for law-enforcement body-cameras; and $5,000 for upgrades to ranger accommodation and facilities
  • $14,953.56 from USFWS (part of a total $78,557.35 grant) was sent to pay for rations for 12 months: 103 pax receive monthly rations of rice, sugar, red wairimu beans, tea leaves, cooking oil & wheat flour, and 64 security-focused rangers also receive monthly rations while deployed of army biscuits, corned beef, tinned pineapple and tinned githeri. $16,500 from USFWS will be used to pay for three rangers’ accommodation units to be rebuilt during 2022 @ $5,500 / unit
  • $5,846.40 from INL paid for more ranger training during December 2021: $1,948.80 for Commanders’ training; and $3,897.60 for the Rhino tactical refresher training
  • $3,637.76 from INL funds paid for patrol medic training

Ol Pejeta Conservancy, Kenya

  • $15,000 from For Rangers’ funds was awarded to pay for: 60 waterproof jackets and trousers, 60 warm jackets and 60 pairs of thermals (trousers and long-sleeved tops); 10 GPS units; 45 rechargeable LED torches; and shipping

Save the Rhino Trust, Namibia

  • $10,000 from For Rangers’ funds was awarded to help pay for the 2021 Ranger Awards Ceremony. 41 Rhino Rangers in the Kunene and Erongo regions of north-western Namibia were honoured at the 2nd Annual Kunene Rhino Awards on 18 November 2021 for their tireless work to protect the Namibia’s free ranging black rhino. The Rhino Rangers are community members within communal conservancies that track and monitor black rhinos through the harsh desert landscape daily, and have continued to do so throughout the pandemic year, ensuring the survival of this population. The winners were: Best rhino ID photo taken during patrol: Jackson Amakutuwa and Jessica Kharuxas; Most foot kilometres walked during the year: Michael Adams (2,167 km); Most active field ranger days: Chips Tjambiru (212 days); and Most rhino sightings during the year: Marthinus Sanib (432 sightings). In addition, Rhino Rangers who have been with the programme for longer than five years received Hero Jackets

Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, South Africa

  • We sent £10,430 to HiP:£430 received in misc. restricted donations that will be spent on ration packs and uniform items; and £10,000 from the Ernest Kleinwort Charitable Trust, which will be split equally between ration packs (c. 700) and uniform items for HiP’s ranger force
  • $5,428 from the Woodtiger Fund will be used to pay for small repairs and maintenance equipment for the Park, e.g. the servicing of lawn mowers and hedge trimmers, used to maintain tourism and patrol roads, and to clear a line along the fence-line; to repairs to generators at outposts that ensure water is pumped and electricity available; to the servicing and maintenance / repairs and/or replacement of boreholes at field ranger camps; and purchasing sundry items such as new taps / joins for handymen working at pickets / Section bases
  • €5,000 from Zoo Zlin was sent to buy kit for rangers’s extended patrols, that are scheduled during periods around the full moon when poachers tend to be most active
  • €500 euros from Parco Natura Viva will be used to pay for more camera traps
  • A grant of $26,593 from the Anna Merz Rhino Trust will be used to pay for three types of ranger training course: four 8-day Combat Man Tracker Training, “Track a Person”, for eight rangers / course; one 12-day Tactical Operations Course, for 10 rangers; and three 4-day First Aid courses, “Provide risk-based primary emergency care / first aid in the workplace”, for 10 rangers / course
  • $4,473 from USFWS (part of a $82,538.20 total grant) was awarded to buy 420 ration packs for HiP’s rangers while on extended patrols. $8,839.50 will buy 150 TacSpec 55-liter daypacks for the Park’s rangers. $23,849.64 from USFWS will be used to pay for accommodation repairs and refurbishment :Manzibomvu Section: water provision; Nqumeni Section: solar-panel system; Masinda Section: cupboards, solar-power system, ablutions block maintenance, water tanks and gas freezer); Makhamisa Section: solar power and plumbing repairs; Mbuzane Section: rethatching eight rondavels; and Reaction Unit Section: Conservation Manager – Law-Enforcement Monitoring accommodation repairs

uMkhuze Game Reserve, South Africa

  • €7,500 euros received from Stichting Wildlife (related to Safaripark Beekse Bergen, Hilvarenbeek, in the Netherlands), a long-standing supporter of rhino conservation efforts in uMkhuze, was awarded to help cover the costs of backpacks, belts and other equipment / uniform items
  • $58,933.39 from USFWS (part of the $67,006.14 total grant) was sent to pay for refurbishment of ranger accommodation: maintenance and refurbishment of three x picket camps’ kitchens and ablutions blocks (Sinkweni, Gwambane and Dakela); complete refurbishment of Shobeni Outpost; refurbishment of Section Ranger South’s office; and the refurbishment of Section Ranger South’s bathroom and kitchen

Rhino horn antiques trade, UK

  • We awarded £1,600 from core funds to pay for the design and layout of “Sounding the Horn, an update: Three years of rhino horn antiques sold at auction in the UK, 2017 to 2019“, written by Sue Brace and edited by SRI’s CEO, Cathy Dean. The updated survey continues to highlight the loopholes in regulations concerning the sale of rhino horn antiques that allow, we believe, horn from poached rhinos to be laundered via the UK’s antiques trade

Rhino Resource Center, UK

  • As in previous years, we awarded £1,000 from our core funds to the Rhino Resource Center, which is an invaluable online reference source for rhino conservationists, field practitioners and students alike. http://www.rhinoresourcecenter.com/

North Luangwa Conservation Programme, Zambia

  • We awarded a total of £924 from core funds to pay for 33 places in the 2021 Virtual London Marathon, as a team-building event to raise morale among North Luangwa’s scout force
  • $10,000 was awarded from For Rangers’ funds to NLCP in Zambia. The North Luangwa Ecosystem’s anti-poaching units are composed of Government-employed DNPW Wildlife Police Officers (WPO), and Community Scouts (CS) who are paid through tourism revenue derived by Community Resource Boards via safari hunting. The current Covid-19 pandemic and the associated suspension of all international tourism poses an ongoing and immense challenge to already marginalised communities. An injection of support specifically for WPO and CS welfare falls in-line with current efforts to overhaul NLCP’s health and wellbeing strategy to improve the physical, mental and emotional fitness of its staff and partners. Addressing WPO / CS female menstrual hygiene will also reduce absenteeism and improve their welfare whilst in the field. In order to sustain law enforcement activities, NLCP will utilise this funding to purchase fitness equipment, sports clothing, footwear, cross-fit accreditation courses; and ‘ufulu’ menstrual hygiene pads for female officers
  • $50,680 from our sister organization, Save the Rhino International Inc., was awarded for a project entitled “Breaking barriers to create female participation in natural resource management”. This project seeks to increase female representation in the wildlife protection sector in North Luangwa by focusing on: Leadership training for 40 female community scouts ($20,000); Gender-bias and barrier soft-skill training for 400 wildlife protection officers ($20,000); 80 spousal visits to the field programme to increase local understanding of spouses’ work ($2,000); and Essential products to cater to 140 women’s needs in the field ($8,680)

African Rhino Specialist Group

  • We sent $5,626 from a USFWS grant and $5,000 from our own core funds to pay Dr Richard Emslie for his work as AfRSG Scientific Officer during the period July-December 2020
  • We sent USD $5,000 from core funds and $8,374 from USFWS to pay Dr Richard Emslie for his work as AfRSG Scientific Officer during the period January-June 2021
  • $16,000 from SRI Inc.’s core funds was awarded to pay for the daily fees of the part-time role of AfRSG Programme Officer (PO), Keitumetse (‘Kate’) Mosweu. The PO will support the Chair, Vice Chairs and Scientific Officer as needed, liaise between and facilitate the Group’s various working groups and task forces, and help organize the triennial meetings
  • $6,574.62 from USFWS funds was sent to pay professional facilitator Lizzie Crudgington for her work to support the planning and facilitation of the 2022 AfRSG virtual meeting, being held in March
  • $10,881.43 from USFWS funds, and $2,211.66 from Oak Philanthropy (UK) Ltd funds, to pay Lizzie Crudgington for her work to support the planning and facilitation of the 2022 AfRSG virtual meeting
  • $23,146 from USFWS (topped up with $854 from core funds, to replace the overspent previous grant), split: $14,000 for the Scientific Officer, and $10,000 for the Programme Officer, for work on core activities during the calendar year 2022; plus another $12,244.84 from core funds for the Scientific Officer’s consultancy fees during 2022
  • £3,756.22 received in miscellaneous donations via our website, including £750 from Patrick Pare on behalf of Zoo de Granby, to help cover the costs of the AfRSG Secretariat: consultancy fees for the Scientific Officer (SO) and Programme Officer (PO), as well as subsistence and travel costs for the Chair and SO, and misc. admin expenses / bank fees as needed

Association of Private and community Land Rhino Sanctuaries, Kenya

  • We sent a total of $16,210.40 from two grants from the Scott and Jessica McClintock Foundation to help cover the salary of the APLRS Administrator salary. John Gitonga is based in the rhino programme office at the Kenya Wildlife Service’s HQ in Nairobi, and works alongside the KWS Rhino Scientist to support rhino sites across Kenya with implementing the activities detailed in the national Black Rhino Action Plan
  • $5,000 from the WildAid grant of $50,000 was allocated towards the legal costs of registering the APLRS properly; earlier paperwork is no longer in line with current legal requirements
  • $9,521.52 from USFWS’s Rhino and Tiger Conservation Fund was sent to help cover the salary and allowances of the APLRS Administrator during calendar year 2022

Borana Conservancy, Kenya

  • We sent the first $5,000 of a 2-part grant totalling $10,000 from WildArk to Borana Conservancy in Laikipia County, Kenya, to help pay for a new environmental education bus. Borana has run the Borana Education Support Programme for many years now, which helps pay for student bursaries and teacher salaries; the ambition is to be able to bring community groups onto the Conservancy itself and introduce them to the wildlife conservation efforts and livestock-to-market programme first-hand. Borana has completed a survey to look at the social impact of protected areas in order to better understand how the Conservancy’s activities affect those of its neighbours
  • And we sent the $5,000 from WildArk, received via CAF America, for Borana’s new environmental education bus
  • The CHK Foundation awarded £10,000 towards the operating costs of Borana’s Mobile Health Clinic, for the period September 2021 to August 2022; to this we added £53 received in miscellaneous donations via our website
  • $43,000 (from the total grant of $48,250 from Save the Rhino International Inc.) was sent to help cover the Y1 (2022) costs of a new conservation education programme at Borana, “Connecting Conservancies and Communities Project (CCCP): Securing the future of black rhino conservation in Laikipia, Kenya”. This Project proposes an expansion of the existing Borana Education Support Programme to address the unsustainable utilization of natural resources in the Ewaso Nyiro ecosystem. The CCCP will engage with Borana’s neighbours to broaden, deepen and inspire their understanding of conservation and its importance for the health of all those, human, faunal and floral, in the landscape. Specifically, the funds will pay for the recruitment and salaries of two new conservation education officers, monoculars and game-viewing guides; and to help cover the purchase and conversion of a bus to bring groups into the Conservancy. This was magnificently supplemented by a grant of $65,300 from Ardea Cares to complete the funding for Y1 of the project: specifically: $33,000 towards the purchase & conversion of a bus, and then for Y1 fuel and maintenance; $32,000 for the construction of a classroom and kitting it out; and $300 for stationery supplies
  • $561.25 (from SRI Inc.’s total grant of $48,250) was sent to reimburse Richard Hennery for a return flight to Nairobi. Richard will be visiting Borana for a week in February to advise on the development of the new conservation education programme; plus another $127.54 to reimburse Richard Hennery for travel expenses (visa, medication, insurance) related to the February trip to Borana
  • $2,000 from Francis and Sandi Blake, in memory of Tony and Rose Dyer, was sent to Borana for the Mobile Health Clinic

Lowveld Rhino Trust, Zimbabwe

  • £19.98 from miscellaneous donations received via our website to pay for LRT’s domain name renewal for the period April 2022 – March 2023

As always, our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.