Grants

A huge thank you to all of our supporters and donors for making all of these grants possible. Please find below a list of grants from the last 12 months; further details can be found in our Audited Accounts and Annual Review.


January 2014

We sent out just a couple of grants out in January, totalling £1,406, as follows:

1,000 euros, raised by the wonderful rhino’s energy GmbH in Germany for the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia, home to five Sumatran rhinos including 20-month-old calf Andatu. We hope that his mother, Ratu, will begin mating again with Andalas as soon as possible in order to continue this breeding programme. 

And thanks to a generous donation from Peter Lawrence, we spent £518 on four cameras, cases and SD cards for the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, to be used for daily rhino monitoring activities.

December 2013

We sent out £58,336 in December 2013, broken down as follows:

£2,066 granted out to Borana Conservancy in Kenya, raised via an auction lot that was bid for at our Heroes dinner in November. In August last year, Borana became home to 21 black rhino, translocated from neighbouring Lewa Wildlife Conservancy and Lake Nakuru National Park. The funds will go to the not-insignificant costs of security and law enforcement in Borana in order to protect these rhinos.

£3,725 to the Dambari Wildlife Trust in Zimbabwe. In 2011, with funding and technical support from USFWS and ourselves, a series of stakeholder workshops in Harare led to the production of a new national rhino strategy. Some two years later, Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority signed it off. We now want to assist ZPMWA, NGOs and other rhino organisations working in Zimbabwe to implement the monitoring and measuring of progress towards the Key Performance Indicators identified in the framework. To that end, we have made a grant of £3,725 from our core funds to Dambari Wildlife Trust, to cover the costs of a 2-day workshop in the second quarter of 2014.

£467 received in miscellaneous donations for the Javan Rhino Study and Conservation Area, to expand the habitat used by Javan rhinos. There is evidence that so far, nine animals have crossed the narrow isthmus from Ujung Kulon National Park and have started using the new habitat offered by Gunung Honje.

£1,034 to Lewa Wildlife Conservancy in Kenya, raised via an auction lot that was bid for at our Heroes dinner in November. Lewa is home to black and white rhino populations and does much environmental education and community outreach work.

We sent £2,569 to Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania, for the ongoing costs of Rafiki wa Faru, the environmental education programme that targets 14 schools surrounding the Park. This was raised by supporter Barry Butler, who climbed Mt Kilimanjaro to raise funds for Save the Rhino.

Thanks to the Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund, we sent $22,500 to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme, for its conservation education programme Lolesha Luangwa. With the purchase of a secondhand truck (funded by USFWS and SRI), visits into the Park for schoolchildren and community leaders will begin in 2014 – ongoing costs of these visits and the programme generally are being covered by DWCF. We are deeply grateful to all of Lolesha Luangwa’s donors.

£1,400 to Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, raised via an auction lot that was bid for at our Heroes dinner in November. Ol Pejeta has populations of black, Southern white and Northern white rhinos, and carries out a wide range of rhino monitoring and anti-poaching activities.

We sent £1,364 to the Rhino Fund Uganda raised by supporter Phil Hobson, who took part in an ironman triathlon from London to Paris last summer. The funds were used to help buy new uniforms for the rangers at Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary; Phil and his wife Pam were able to see the impact of their support when they visited Ziwa as paying volunteers over Christmas and New Year.

Chester Zoo awarded £8,000, and we added another £142 from miscellaneous restricted donations, to the Rhino Protection Unit programme in Indonesia. Way Kambas National Park and Bukit Barisan Selatan National Park are two of the three parks in Indonesia to hold viable populations of Sumatran rhinos, and the work of the RPUs is essential to securing their survival.

We sent a wonderful £22,858 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, thanks to the generosity of donors to our Operation Wild and Free appeal. We’d particularly like to mention Zoo Bassin d’Arcachon, rhino’s energy GmbH, Neil Taylor, Dave Hamman, Richard Keyser, and Woburn Safari Park, which raised an amazing £8,342 for SRT, via a range of fundraising activities carried out by Curator Sasha Saunders and his team.

Finally, we sent £935 to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia, donated by individuals in response to our “I will survive” appeal that ran in 2012.

Our very grateful thanks to all our donors who made these grants possible.

November 2013

In total, we granted out £15,675

We sent £12,500, awarded by Chester Zoo, to the Big Life Foundation in Kenya, to cover the increased costs of constructing a secure second waterhole inside the Chyulu Hills National Park, fed by the USFWS-funded borehole sunk a couple of years ago. Since the original quote in autumn 2012, costs of labour and raw materials have increased, and VAT has become payable, making the project more expensive than anticipated. We are deeply grateful to Chester Zoo’s Field Conservation and Research Department for stepping in to help.

We awarded £1,300 from miscellaneous restricted donations received for Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, to pay for emergency repairs to Section Ranger Dirk Swart’s motorbike – essential for getting around the Park – and for ear defenders for rangers to use while on weapons training. Maintaining readiness is a key part of the anti-poaching effort, and we were delighted to be able to step in to cover these urgent requests for help.

Finally, we sent £1,875 to Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, to go towards the costs of its dog team (bloodhound tracker dogs and Belgian Malinois attack dogs). These funds were raised through the generous support of sculptor Camilla le May, whose bronze rhino and silver brooches were auctioned at our Heroes Dinner in November.

We are very grateful to all these donors for their support.

October 2013

We sent out a total of £4,244 this month, from a grant by USFWS to pay for an exchange visit of rhino monitors. Three staff of the Big Life Foundation in Kenya will spend a fortnight with the team from Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, tracking rhinos in the Kunene Region, where the harsh, arid terrain is very different from the thick acacia scrub of the Chyulu Hills. The group will also visit Waterberg Plateau Park to meet the Anti-Poaching Unit there. This grant will pay for airfares and for living and transport expenses while in Namibia.


September 2013

In total, we granted out £58,804, which breaks down as follows:

We sent $10,000 for the core costs of the IUCN SSC African Rhino Specialist Group’s Secretariat: half of this came from USFWS and half from our own core funds. The AfRSG plays a crucial strategic, political and advisory role and its service are in great demand due to the rhino poaching crisis.

The Taiwan Forestry Bureau awarded another $5,000 for the ongoing running costs of the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia; the fifth consecutive year that the Bureau has supported Sumatran rhino conservation through Save the Rhino.

We received and sent out a grant of $7,500 from SRI Inc for the ongoing costs of the Rhino Protection Unit programme in Indonesia, which works in Bukit Barisan Selatan and Way Kambas National Parks in Sumatra and Ujung Kulon National Park in Java.

£10,075 went to Borana Conservancy in Kenya, thanks to the fundraising efforts of Nicholas Nangunye, head horse-riding guide at Borana Ranch, who ran the London Marathon for us in April. These funds will be spent on fencing upgrades, which helps resolves human-wildlife conflict while keeping Borana’s rhinos inside the Conservancy, to Borana’s education support programme and to Borana's information networks. This will be of direct benefit to the rhino and also continue to strengthen the community involvement in the process.

We sent £28,653 to Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania, as the first instalment of the payment for a new digital radio system to upgrade security measures in Mkomazi and to provide greater analysis of patrol deployment and effectiveness. $43,975 of this came from USFWS and $1,860 from our own core funds.

Finally, we sent £6,001 to North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia. $7,650 of this paid for the costs of 51 Degrees Ltd, a security firm, to visit North Luangwa to conduct security assessment (£4,782 from core funds and £490 from restricted donations received). The other £719 came from Peter Lawrence and was used to pay for the reprinting of the Activity Booklet for Lolesha Luangwa and for a PA system, solar lights and dictaphone used during the Conservation Celebration Days.

Our thanks to all the donors who made these grants possible.

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August 2013

We sent a grand total of £138,116 out in grants to field programmes in August 2013, which breaks down as follows:

£4,589 to the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya, for its emergency fund for black rhinos. £1,350 of this came from the Nature Picture Library and Bluegreen Pictures, which chose us as its charity for the month in September 2012. The Emergency Fund pays out 50% of the costs incurred for any emergency response required, whether treating a rhino for bullet wounds, recapturing animals that have broken through fences, or dealing with rhinos that have been fighting. We had hoped, based on 2011-12 figures, and on our grant made at the beginning of 2012, that this grant would be enough to cover the period April 2013-March 2014. However, when the claims for 2012-13 had been reconciled, the result of increased poaching levels in Kenya meant that more funds were required than had been anticipated, and our August grant is in fact being used to pay claims from last year. We are therefore now fundraising again for the current 2013-4 period.

We sent £55-worth of stickers, with Sporting Rifle and Save the Rhino logos, to Big Game Parks in Swaziland, to brand the bicycles bought for their rangers to use while on patrol.

We sent $25,383 from a USFWS-RTCF grant to Borana Conservancy in Kenya, which received 21 black rhinos (from Lewa Wildlife Conservancy and Lake Nakuru National Park) in August. These funds paid for the Kenya Wildlife Service’s helicopter and fixed-wing flying time during the translocations, and for telemetry equipment to monitor the rhinos on a daily basis.

We awarded a total of $72,797 to Big Life Foundation in Kenya for the Chyulu Hills rhino programme. £15,000 of this came from Chester Zoo Act for Wildlife, to pay for the construction of a second waterhole / pipeline running from the existing borehole at the Mukururo KWS headquarters. This will create an extra water source, deeper inside the Park. Another $81,663 from USFWS-RTCF was also for the new waterhole, as well as covering scout wages, rations, uniforms, vehicle running costs and radios. Finally, £5,000 from the Ernest Kleinwort Charitable Trust will help cover staff costs and rations.

We spent £1,446 on designing, printing and shipping the new “Zimbabwe rhino policy and management framework 2011-16” to Zimbabwe, thus completing our part of this project. The challenge now for all stakeholders tasked with monitoring and protecting the country’s white and black rhino populations to deliver their outputs / activities and to measure and report on their Key Performance Indicators.

£1,155 went to Education Nature Vietnam, to pay for costs of a press conference to announce the findings of a visit by a Vietnamese delegation to South Africa, to raise awareness of the rhino poaching crisis within Vietnam.

£36,854 from a £43,000 grant from the Beit Trust was paid out as the first instalment on a new digital radio system in Bubye Valley Conservancy in Zimbabwe. This will allow greater efficiency of patrols and analysis of hotspots and area coverage. We also sent £4,000 from our Operation Stop Poaching Now appeal to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe for rhino poaching investigations. The funds will help pay for a task force involving Police and the Attorney-General’s Office to review the recent court cases of rhino poachers that did not result in convictions; some of the funds will also be used to boost a training course and get more handbooks printed.

Finally, we sent £750 raised by Andree and Marcell Schoombee via their Going Down Under challenge to the Rhino Fund Uganda. This money will be used to pay for new uniforms for the scouts working in Ziwa Rhino Sanctuary.


July 2013

We sent $68,100 from USFWS RTCF to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, to help cover the salaries of the Director of Capacity Building and the Director of Field Operations, the tracker teams based in the northern Kunene and at Desert Rhino Camp and the camel-based team, and vehicle running costs. SRT monitors the world’s largest free-ranging black rhino population over a vast area, some 16,000 km sq, and regular sightings of the Kunene’s rhinos are essential to check on condition, dispersal and their safety.

We transferred $21,770, also from USFWS RCTF, to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia for its environmental education programme, Lolesha Luangwa. With technical support from the Zoological Society of London, and financial support from USFWS, Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund, Frankfurt Zoological Society and ourselves, this programme is developing in really exciting ways, and we’re now getting great monitoring and evaluation results. We’ll be writing about this in the spring 2014 issue of our magazine, The Horn.

A total of £43,420 was paid out to suppliers providing services and equipment to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, which carries out annual rhino operations to fit RFID tags, satellite bracelets, microchips etc, as well as taking DNA samples for the RhODIS, the Rhino DNA Index System at the Veterinary Genetics Lab in Onderstepoort in South Africa.

We paid design, printing and shipping bills totalling £697 to send 220 copies of the new “Zimbabwe rhino policy and management framework 2011-16”. This document arose out of workshops held in Harare in March 2011. Save the Rhino’s Director’s husband, Kenneth Donaldson, drafted this Framework during his sabbatical in 2011, but it has taken some two years for the Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority to sign off the final text. We now look forward to helping Zimbabwe’s rhino stakeholders implement the Framework.

Finally, we sent £4,925 from our core funds to the Laikipia Wildlife Forum in Kenya, to help pay for events to mark World Rhino Day on Sunday 22 September. This day begins an entire conservation week in Laikipia, that will culminate in World Tourism Day the following weekend.


June 2013

We sent £42,836 out in June, which broke down as follows:

£965 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, to cover the costs of its North West Wildlife Security Workshop meeting in July. This is a group of stakeholders, including Save the Rhino Trust, the Ministry of Environment and Tourism, communal conservancies etc who meet regularly to asses security threats and to plan future action.

We sent $25,000 to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, to buy a secondhand overland truck, which will be put into use to take selected schoolgroups and their teachers into North Luangwa National Park, so that they can see wildlife – and perhaps even a black rhino – for themselves. This is a key extension of the Lolesha Luangwa programme that has been running so successfully since the Zoological Society of London began mentoring the programme in July 2012. We are deeply grateful to USFWS RTCF, which provided $20,000; the remainder came from our own core funds.

Amneville Zoo in France continued to support the Big Life Foundation’s rhino protection work in the Chyulu Hills National Park and Mbirikani Group Ranch in Kenya, with another annual grant of 10,000 euros. These funds will help pay ranger salaries and buy field rations.

We sent 20,000 rand to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, from the total donation of 7,500 euros awarded by Safaripark Beekse Bergen in the Netherlands. This will be used to make small, discreet payments to a network of informers: intelligence is the key to intercepting poachers before they have actually killed a rhino.

We awarded $4,116 to Borana Conservancy in Kenya, to help pay for horn transmitters. Borana  and Save the Rhino hope very much that the planned translocation of black rhinos from Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, Lake Nakuru National Park and Nairobi National Park goes ahead, as planned, in August. All translocated rhinos will have horn transmitters fitted to aid daily tracking and visual inspections as they settle in to their new home.

We sent £9,740, thanks to a grant from USFWS RTCF, to the Mkomazi Rhino Sanctuary in Tanzania for the ongoing running costs of its environmental education programme, Rafiki wa Faru, for the period July 2013-June 2014.

Finally, we sent £3,234 to the Zambezi Society in Zimbabwe, thanks to a grant from WildCRU in Oxford for ZamSoc’s ongoing big cat work.

Our thanks to all donors who made these grants possible.


May 2013

In total, we gave out a pleasing £57,778 in grants in May, which breaks down as follows:

We sent £11,059 to the Big Life Foundation in Kenya, for its rhino and general wildlife protection work in the Chyulu Hills National Park and adjoining Mbirikani Game Ranch. £10,557 came from our core funds, and will help pay for game scout field rations and salaries, while the other £502 came from a £2,000 grant from the Treasure Charitable Trust, and paid for camera traps, batteries and memory cards, in response to this year’s three rhino poaching incidents.

We transferred a lovely total of £23,420 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, made possible by several donors as follows: £4,930 from Colchester Zoo’s Action for the Wild for digital & video cameras, GPS, batteries, pepper sprays, handcuffs, Cybertrackers & firearm cleaning material;  3,250 euros from a 7,500 euro grant from SafariPark Beekse Bergen for horseback patrol equipment; $21,534 from USFWS RTCF for HiP for Bathawk fuel & maintenance, insurance and admin costs; and £1,663 from our core funds for a metal detector, rifle mount, Glock tactical light fittings, drill for fence maintenance and toolbox. Our thanks to Colchester Zoo, SafariPark Beekse Bergen and USFWS RTCF for their longstanding support for this programme.

£551 from USFWS RTCF paid for on-the-ground expenses for six members of staff from the Lowveld Rhino Trust to visit the Big Life Foundation in Kenya, as part of a series of exchange visits to boost rhino monitors’ skills and morale.

We sent £13,813 from USFWS to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, to pay for annual rhino operations in Etosha National Park, the Kunene Region and other rhino areas of Namibia. This covered various items including veterinary fees, drugs, darts and other consumables used during rhino ops.

We used some of the funds raised from our Operation Stop Poaching Now appeal to send £4,000 to WWF-SA for a joint project with the Endangered Wildlife Trust to develop a library of information that will be provided to targeted personnel within law enforcement and prosecution agencies and a capacity building programme to reinforce the use of these materials. These tools can then be used by law enforcement agency personnel when acting as expert witnesses and providing information in aggravation of sentence in court.

We sent $5,000 from the Taiwan Forestry Bureau to the Sumatran Rhino Sanctuary in Indonesia, to help cover running costs of the Sanctuary – keeper salaries, veterinary supplies, browse collection and supplementary feed. This is the fifth year running that the TFB has supported Asian rhino conservation efforts through Save the Rhino, and we are really grateful for their support.

Finally, we gave £1,327 to the Environmental Investigation Agency, with which we partner on the annual Douglas Adams Memorial Lectures, held as close as possible to Douglas’s birthday – 11 March – each year at the Royal Geographic Society. Douglas was a Founder Patron of Save the Rhino and a strong supporter of the EIA.


April 2013

In April we granted out a total of £48,436 as follows:

£38,843 went to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia. £1,375 completed the series of grants made for the rhino technology workshop held in November 2012, when c. 45 field programme managers convened to look at the latest equipment items used for rhino monitoring and security. 4,000 euros from Opel Zoo in Germany + 500 euros from our core funds paid for an infra-red camera: MET will begin to experiment with darting rhinos at night, as they come to waterholes. If this works well, it would greatly reduce helicopter and fixed-wing costs for future rhino operations. £29,069 came from USFWS for rhino operations in Etosha National Park (helicopter and pilot hire), and another £4,563 from USFWS paid for dart-gun and accessories, darts, cartridges and scope for 2013 rhino operations in the Kunene, Hardap Dam, Waterberg Plateau Park and Namib Naukluft.

£632 from the Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund was used to pay for an education professional to help run teachers’ training workshops in North Luangwa, Zambia, for the Lolesha Luangwa programme, to introduce the teachers to the new Teachers’ Conservation Guide developed by ZSL in late 2012.

We sent £894, raised by HelpingRhinos.org, to Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, to pay for new headsets for OPC’s anti-poaching unit.

We sent £900 from the funds raised by our Operation Stop Poaching Now appeal to Onderstepoort Veterinary Laboratory at the University of Pretoria, to pay for the flight costs for Dr Cindy Harper and an assistant to visit Namibia to deliver a course on how to collect forensic DNA evidence from wildlife crime sites.

We sent £900 to the Rhino Resource Center, for ongoing work to maintain its excellent online reference library of all rhino-related publications. This is an excellent resource for field programme staff, PhD and MSc students and the general public.

Finally, we sent the last $10,000, from a total grant of $100,000 from Save Our Species, to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, to support its ongoing field patrolling and monitoring programme.

We are extremely grateful to all the donors who made these grants possible.


March 2013

We sent final payments totaling £1,318 for the 11th African Rhino Specialist Group meeting in Kenya, paying for equipment hire at the conference and day fees for the 16 Kenyan rhino experts who joined us for Day 3 of the meeting.


February 2013

We gave out a modest £2,923 in February, with more grants expected to go out in the next few months.

£2,087 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, for its Field Patrolling and Monitoring Programme. 2,000 euros came from Krefeld Zoo in Germany, which is supporting SRT for the second time, and the other £375 was from our core funds, to reward the informer whose information led to the recovery of a pair of rhino horns and the arrest of two individuals, in connection with the rhino poaching incident in the Kunene Region just before Christmas. The information received was a vital step for the investigation.

£581 went towards the costs of the African Rhino Specialist Group meeting, held in February in Kenya.

£144 paid for the renewal of the Lowveld Rhino Trust’s domain name for its website.

The remaining £111 was for misc. items of kit donated to staff from the Maasailand Preservation Trust / Big Life Foundation in the Chyulu Hills of Kenya, the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, and the Association of Private Land Rhino Sanctuaries in Kenya.


January 2013

We granted £38,858 as follows:

We sent a total of £11,508 – a mixture of core funds, USFWS and WWF-SA – to help pay for the African Rhino Specialist Group meeting in February in Kenya. This covered some delegates’ flights and accommodation at the meeting, as well as internal transfers from the airport to the venue.

We gave a total of £600 to the Dambari Wildlife Trust in Zimbabwe, for its ongoing work in the Matobos Hills, which still has small numbers of black and white rhinos. The funds came from our Adventure! Dinner, when we auctioned the chance to volunteer for two weeks at Dambari’s lovely field station just outside Bulawayo.

We awarded £4,850 to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park, made up of miscellaneous donations from a range of people – Julie Mather, Bruce Simpson, Peter de Wit, Vlok and Daniel Holland – to pay for 50 gas bottles (for cooking) and the repair of the tractor, used for transporting water to outposts. Having field rangers positioned strategically around the Park is essential for good anti-poaching.

£320 went to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, as part of the USFWS grant for a series of exchange visits, enabling rhino monitors from Zimbabwe, Namibia and Kenya to visit each other in turn. The visit by the LRT to the Chyulu Hills Game scout and rhino programme in Kenya took place in February and was, by all accounts, a great success!

We sent £21,472 to the Ministry of Environment and Tourism in Namibia, for flying during annual rhino operations in the Kunene and other areas. This came from a larger grant from USFWS, which has supported rhino ops in Namibia for many years.

And finally, we paid out £108 to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, for its Conservation Education Programme, now called “Lolesha Luangwa”. Our partner, ZSL, is delivering 2 x teacher-training workshops in March, to introduce the schools’ Conservation Teachers to the new materials developed by ZSL at the end of 2012.

As always, our grateful thanks to all our kind and generous donors.


December 2012

We granted out a total of £77,066 as follows:

£6,227 for the core work of the African Rhino Specialist Group. Half of this came from our own core funds, the remainder from USFWS. The capacity building and coordination work of the AfRSG is a vital part of rhino conservation efforts in Africa.

We sent a total of £23,981 for the 2013 meeting of the African Rhino Specialist Group. This meeting is being funded by Save the Rhino, USFWS, WWF-SA, Defra, Ol Pejeta Conservancy (in-kind support) and participants’ own organizations. The funds are being used to pay for participants’ flights, accommodation and conference costs and internal transfers. For further information on the meeting, click here.

Knuthenborg Safari Park in Denmark raised a wonderful 19,000 Danish Krone, which translates to £2,127, for Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park. The money will be used to buy 7 x camouflage uniforms for the Anti-Poaching Unit and 15 x Landcruiser tyres for patrol vehicles.

We sent grants totaling £31,707 to the Lowveld Rhino Trust in Zimbabwe, which monitors important black and white rhino populations in Save Valley Conservancy and Bubye Conservancy. £17,709 of this came from Knowsley Safari Park, which has fundraised for the Lowveld over the last three years: £6,250 was used for ongoing rhino monitoring, while the remainder is being used for a community incentives scheme, whereby schools are rewarded based on a net gain in the black rhino population. Dublin Zoo gave 5,000 euros for ongoing monitoring, we gave £5,955 from our own core funds, and other people made additional donations via our website totaling another £1,966. Finally, we sent £2,043 from USFWS funding to pay for the third in a sequence of exchange visits, to pay for three trackers and the rhino monitoring coordinator to visit the Chyulu Hills Game scout and rhino programme.

We gave £1,756, from core funds and a Disney Worldwide Conservation Fund grant to pay for the costs of Paul Bamford and Kate Oliver, from the Zoological Society of London’s Learning and Discovery Department, to fly to North Luangwa in March 2013, to run a series of teacher training workshops to introduce teachers in schools surrounding North Luangwa National Park to the new curriculum developed at the end of last year by ZSL. ZSL has contributed approximately $26,000-worth of time and technical support to North Luangwa’s Conservation Education Programme, so we were pleased to be able to cover some of their costs for this return visit.

Finally, we sent over £11,268 to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia. £10,025 was from our core funds, and will be used to help cover SRT’s finance and admin costs for the period Oct-12 to Nov-13:  finance personnel salaries, telephone & ADSL line, alarm monitoring costs, water & electricity - SRT office, stationery, computer costs, insurance, cleaning, postage and courier costs, printing, garage rental x 2, consultancy fees, Trustee expenses, bank charges, payroll costs and audit fees. Another £900 was raised from an auction lot donated by Wilderness Safaris and auctioned at our annual dinner in October 2012, while £343 was donated by supporters via our website.

Thank you to everyone who made these donations possible.


November 2012

We granted a total of £30,204 to field programmes as follows:

We sent £4,825 to Big Game Parks in Swaziland, raised by the readers of Sporting Rifle magazine via an auction of donated lots. Our thanks to all the donors of the lots and to the bidders. The funds will be used to pay for bicycles in increase patrol mobility and for bullet-proof vests for the anti-poaching unit.

£3,225 went to Hluhluwe-iMfolozi Park in South Africa, for rhino anti-poaching operations. This money came from the raffle we held at our Adventure! dinner in October, in which the star prize was an 8-night holiday for two people in KwaZulu-Natal, including 2 nights in the Park/

£125 went to the Kenya Wildlife Service to help cover the costs of the Cycle with Rhinos event in Lake Nakuru National Park.

We paid out £6,606 on invoices incurred by the rhino technology meeting hosted by Namibia’s Ministry of Environment and Tourism. Save the Rhino booked almost all the flights for the attendees, as well as arranging the conference venue and accommodation and organising internal transfers. The meeting costs were mainly covered by USFWS, though we also contributed funds, and Namibia Wildlife Resorts offered a generous discount on the venue.

We awarded a total of £13,905 to the North Luangwa Conservation Programme in Zambia, thanks to a series of grants / donations received, as well as our own core funds. Peter Lawrence once again donated £1,000, which paid for 5 digital cameras + cases + memory cards, as well as helping to fund pickets in the rhino sanctuary; $20,060 from USFWS for the ongoing costs of the Conservation Education Programme, now renamed “Lolesha Luangwa”, and another £969 from core funds.

£1,311 went to Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, from the proceeds of an auction lot sold at our Adventure! dinner in October.

£650 from core funds to Save the Rhino Trust in Namibia, to help cover the costs of a small Scene-of-the-Crime training course held in Etosha National Park. The original USFWS grant paid for Advanced, Train-the-trainer and Basic courses in February 2012, and it’s great to see the learning being rolled out to other people.

Finally, we gave out various items of kit (SRI Tshirts, caps, badges etc) to many field programme staff in Kenya, Namibia and Zambia; these are often used as rewards for special achievements and are a great motivator.


October 2012

We granted a total of £45,718 to field programmes as follows:

£12,527 to a Vietnamese NGO called Education for Nature-Vietnam. This is the first time that Save the Rhino has made a grant to an NGO working in one of the rhino horn consumer countries, and is in response to the rising demand for rhino horn that is leading to poaching levels unprecedented since the late 1980s and early 1990s. The grant will pay for two projects: a public awareness campaign that will run from Dec 2012 to Sept 2013 and a law enforcement project. It involves targeting businessmen and the general public. For businessmen, ENV is contacting CEOs of companies, producing Tet postcards, printing adverts in business newspapers/magazine, running viral ads and working with corporate partnerships. For the general public, ENV is producing two PSAs that will run on TV and radio, as well as working with traditional medicine providers and drugstores to place materials in their shops, a university programme and an online viral campaign. On the law enforcement side, our grant will be used to strengthen ENV’s Wildlife Crime Unit and help to pay for the toll-free hotline for reporting of wildlife crimes and its officers who work with the local authorities to follow up on crimes.

We sent £4,825 to Mkhuze Game Reserve in KwaZulu-Natal, South